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Department of Mathematics

Past Mentors

Here are some thoughts on the program from some of our past mentors.

 

Jacob Jullierat

Jacob Juillerat (2019-2020)

"Training to be a mentor has helped push me as a teacher by showing me how to critically reflect on my teaching practices. I look forward to helping guide novice instructors as they face challenges, and learn some new techniques to implement in my classroom."

Jeremiah Southwick

Jeremiah Southwick (2019-2020)

"I appreciate the mentoring program because it provides a framework to observe another instructor and then aid that colleague in their development as an educator. This is valuable both for the novice being observed and for myself, because it gives me a better idea of the questions I should be raising in my own mind as I approach the task of teaching in my own classroom."

Candace Bethea

Candace Bethea (2018-2019)

"The most valuable aspect of the mentor program for me is the chance to discuss teaching in a friendly environment in the small group meetings. Sharing ideas about both the difficulties and the exciting parts about teaching with people coming from different backgrounds and experience levels gave me a platform to think more about my own teaching beliefs and practices. Furthermore, being able to plan and, to an extent, lead meetings gave me invaluable leadership experience"

Alicia Lamarche

Alicia Lamarche (2018-2019)

"The peer mentor program has helped me grow as both a learner and a teacher of mathematics. Besides providing much needed guidance during my first semesters as an instructor, it has fostered a supportive teaching community within our math department."

Robert Vandermolen

Robert Vandermolen (2018-2019)

"Working so closely with and observing novice teachers has helped me develop classroom engagement and management techniques that I would not have seen working alone. Also, guiding the novices with active reflection has been extremely rewarding in many ways from helping novices push themselves to discovering new ideas and questioning assumptions together. Additionally the PD ran by Dr. Yee will help me reflect on and push my teaching for the rest of my career."

Duncan Wright

Duncan Wright (2018-2019)

"The mentor program has given me many skills, both teaching and non-teaching, that I would not have acquired elsewhere as a graduate student.  Through the professional development involved while preparing to become a mentor, I have learned not only what types of active-learning techniques can be implemented in the classroom and their benefits to the students, but I have also learned how to implement these techniques and incorporate them into a lesson plan.  I have also learned how to facilitate discussions about teaching practices and philosophies with other Graduate Student Instructors, allowing me to support a culture of collegiality at the university. The entire experience working with Dr. Sean Yee, the other mentors and the novices has helped me develop as an educator and I will use the lessons I have learned as a colleague and faculty member wherever life takes me next."

Gregory Clark

Gregory Clarke (2016-2018)

"The mentorship program fostered an inclusive, teaching-centered culture where novice instructors could discuss teaching problems, solutions, and philosophies. As a mentor, I observed graduate student instructors apply the teaching practices we previously discussed in group meetings to more actively engage students in the classroom."

James Sweeney

James Sweeney (2016-2018)

"The mentoring program was vital in educating me how to discuss teaching with my peers. It also turned me into a more reflective teacher that can think critically about past classes and use my own observations to improve my courses. Finally, the program gave me several new tools to use in the classroom to increase student engagement. The lessons learned in the mentoring program will continue to influence my teaching decisions for years to come."

Alexander Wiedemann

Alexander K. Wiedemann (2016-2018)

"'This program has certainly caused a shift in the department's teaching culture. Indeed, it is now common to see cooperative development of teaching practices, even outside the formality of the mentor meetings. I have learned so much, and strongly believe that my teaching has become more effective and efficient as a result of this culture of critical reflection of teaching practices. There is little debate on the importance of allowing students to reflect, practice, and work cooperatively, so it is exciting to see this trend carry upward to the instructors themselves."

 


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