Recent Stories

Thomas Crocker smiling

Constitutional law scholar discusses his new book on presidential powers

October 18, 2021, Craig Brandhorst

Law professor Thomas Crocker specializes in constitutional law, criminal procedure, free speech and democracy, national security and the Constitution. His new book, "Overcoming Necessity: Emergency, Constraint, and the Meanings of American Constitutionalism" (Yale University Press) is an analysis of how the concept of necessity, in conflict with constitutional commitments, creates dynamic challenges to constitutional governance, especially during times of emergency.

Colleen Clark headshot

New faculty spotlight: Colleen Clark

October 15, 2021, Dan Cook

When Colleen Clark signed up to play drums as an elementary school student, she was initially told to play flute instead. In 2019, she became the first woman — and first drummer — to earn a doctorate in jazz performance from the University of North Texas. At South Carolina, she wants to ensure that the jazz program is welcoming to all.

Visual communications instructor Jason Porter wears headphones and sits in front of a microphone and laptop

Podcast bridges the gap between students and real-world opportunities

October 12, 2021, Matt Edwards

Visual communications instructor Jason Porter knows his students are deserving of the dream jobs they’ve worked hard to prepare for. That’s why he makes careers more accessible to them by welcoming guest speakers into his classroom. When the COVID-19 pandemic put a halt to in-person classes in spring 2020, Porter launched his Let’s Get a Job podcast as a way to continue sharing guest speakers with students.

photo illustration of a woman wearing a ski hat surrounded by floating numbers

Journalism through numbers: Alumna tells stories with statistics

October 05, 2021, Lauren Arabis

If you turned to the internet for insights leading up to the 2020 presidential election, there’s a good chance you’re already familiar with Anna Wiederkehr’s work. Wiederkehr, a 2012 visual communications alumna, is the senior visual journalist for FiveThirtyEight, a website that uses statistical data to explore everything from sports to politics.

A North Atlantic right whale breaches the surface of the water.

UofSC professor: Human-driven climate change is devastating ocean ecosystems

September 28, 2021, Rose Cisneros and Bryan Gentry

Warming oceans are driving some marine populations out of their habitats and into peril, according to new research by University of South Carolina professor Erin Meyer-Gutbrod. The temperature change is affecting creatures large and small, from the critically endangered North Atlantic right whale to more common fish whose habitats are losing oxygen.

Breanne Grace stands in front of Maxcy College.

Building a community of learning in the International House at Maxcy College

September 23, 2021, Abe Danaher

There’s no denying that college is a time of great change. For the students living on-campus in the International House at Maxcy College, the change is especially pronounced: Not only are they adapting to college, they’re also adapting to living with people from different cultures throughout the world. Breanne Grace, new faculty principal at Maxcy College, hopes to provide a supportive community that will promote learning and expand students’ perspectives as they settle in.

Artist's rendition of ancient buildings made of mudbricks with explosion in sky

A giant space rock demolished an ancient Middle Eastern city and everyone in it

September 21, 2021, Christopher Moore

About 3,600 years ago, a giant space rock exploded in a massive fireball in the atmosphere above an ancient Middle Eastern city. The explosion destroyed the city, killing its 8,000 inhabitants and setting off a massive shockwave that ripped through the city and surrounding areas. University of South Carolina archaeologist Christopher Moore and his colleagues explain for The Conversation how they know how this actually happened near the Dead Sea in Jordan thousands of years ago.

Nate Johnson at Rose Hill Plantation

Putting history to work in the world

September 16, 2021, Page Ivey

UofSC's public history graduates apply their knowledge and love of history to encourage civic engagement by making the past more understandable and accessible to the general public. They also are helping to refine our understanding of our past through new scholarship to tell a more inclusive history.

Cartoon drawing of an animal paw holding a cellphone with a drawing of a chicken. Headline

New book puts children in driver's seat for navigating information highway

September 13, 2021, Téa Smith

Children have the internet at their fingertips with phones and tablet, but the ability to discern what’s fact and what’s fiction hasn’t kept pace with advances in technology and accessibility. Faculty and staff in the College of Information and Communications are working to bridge that knowledge gap with a children’s book about news literacy.

The Horseshoe at the University of South Carolina

UofSC retains top spots for first-year student experience, international business

September 13, 2021, Megan Sexton

The University of South Carolina has the top first-year student experience of any public college in the country, according to U.S. News and World Report’s annual undergraduate rankings. UofSC also retained its No. 1 ranking in international business for the 23rd straight year.

Jamy Claire Archer stands in the COMD lab

Hindsight 2020: The therapist

September 01, 2021, Craig Brandhorst

Singers, teachers and public speakers can feel the effects of the pandemic, whether or not they contract the virus. Enter clinical professor of communication sciences and disorders and voice therapist Jamy Claire Archer, one of 10 Gamecocks Carolinian magazine spoke to about how the pandemic has changed the way we work.

Elise Lewis, faculty principal of Capstone Scholars Program

Capstone Scholars faculty principal uses lessons from her own experience to guide living, learning community

September 01, 2021, Chris Horn

When she was a college freshman, Elise Lewis learned firsthand what happens when a student gets lost in the shuffle of a big university. Now, as faculty principal of the Capstone Scholars Program, one of the University of South Carolina’s best-known living and learning communities, Lewis is keen on getting students connected with one another and the university resources that can help them to thrive.

a woman receives a COVID vaccination

How public health partnerships are encouraging COVID-19 vaccination

August 31, 2021, Brooke McKeever

Journalism professor Brooke McKeever is among four public health and communications experts from Michigan, Indiana, Mississippi and South Carolina who explain for The Conversation how they are teaming up with nonprofits and other partners to encourage more people in their states and local communities to get the COVID-19 vaccine.

A student taking notes in a classroom

New degree programs debut in Fall '21

August 12, 2021, Cam Adams

The University of South Carolina is expanding its degree offerings with 13 new programs set to launch this fall that will better prepare students for careers in cybersecurity, education, nursing, business and music among other fields.

Display rack of Apple products at the University of South Carolina's Gamecock iHub store

Gamecock iHub, UofSC's Apple Authorized Campus Store, opens

August 12, 2021, Allen Wallace

The University of South Carolina’s Apple Authorized Campus Store, Gamecock iHub, officially opens for business Aug. 13 with a grand opening ceremony. It is only the second in the nation to incorporate experiential learning into its business model.

head and shoulders photo of Patricia Fabel

Garnet Apple Teaching Award: Patricia Fabel

August 05, 2021, Craig Brandhorst

For associate professor of pharmacy Patricia Fabel, classroom education is a team effort, with students contributing their own experiences to the discussion. “Whether we're talking about immunizations, medications, over-the-counter products or things that they've interacted with and their family has interacted with, they bring different perspectives to the table,” she says.

Hudsonian Godwit

Biologist searches for environmental tipping points in marathon migratory species

July 26, 2021, Chris Horn

As a population biologist at the University of South Carolina, Nate Senner studies migratory bird species whose feats of endurance make his own look almost puny by comparison. What interests him most is not just the extremes that different bird species can endure but the many environmental variables to which they must adapt — with the long-term survival of their species population hanging in the balance.

xiaoming li

Breakthrough Leader: Xiaoming Li

July 14, 2021, Chris Horn

If Xiaoming Li was a professional athlete instead of a public health professor, he would make the All-Star team every year. Since joining the university in 2015 as director of the South Carolina SmartState Center for Health Care Quality, Li has authored or co-authored 179 scholarly publications and instituted an interdisciplinary campuswide Junior Scholar program that has successfully trained 41 doctoral students from different disciplines.

UofSC faculty experts list on the Summer Olympics

June 25, 2021, Tenell Felder

Japan will host the Summer Olympic Games July 23 to Aug. 8. Though the Olympics will be taking place in 2021 due to the COVID-19 pandemic, they will continue to be officially branded as the 2020 Tokyo Olympics. To help journalists report on the Tokyo games, the University of South Carolina has compiled a list of faculty experts.

Yi Wang

Breakthrough Star: Yi Wang

June 15, 2021, Chris Horn

Simulation and computing is a mainstay in engineering design, a mathematical modeling process that allows engineers to predict the behavior of a machine or system in real-world conditions. But if the datasets are huge and complex, modeling can take days or even weeks to sort out. That’s why Yi Wang is using a method called reduced-order models to speed things up.

Film character Lady of Guadalupe in pink and lace dress and blue shawl over her head

'Lady of Guadalupe' avoids tough truths

June 14, 2021, Rebecca Janzen

The film “Lady of Guadalupe” available on many streaming services, mixes a fictional retelling of the 16th-century appearance of the Virgin Mary to a Mexican peasant named Juan Diego with the tale of a wholly fictional 21st-century reporter. Professor of Spanish and comparative literature Rebecca Janzen writes in The Conversation although the film portrays the story of the Virgin of Guadalupe for a broad audience, ultimately itsanitizes the real-life brutality of the Church toward Indigenous peoples in the 16th century.

Allie Trice will attend graduate school at Oxford thanks to the Barry Scholarship

English, history graduate is first UofSC recipient of Barry Scholarship to study at Oxford

June 14, 2021, Page Ivey

Allie Trice was an outstanding undergraduate student at the University of South Carolina, excelling in class and conducting publishable research. But a dedication to the pursuit of truth is even more important for the university’s first recipient of the Barry Scholarship, which opened the door to graduate school at the University of Oxford.

Van Kornegay with drone

High-flying photography

June 09, 2021, Chris Horn

When Van Kornegay earned his pilot’s license last year, his feet never left the ground, but he paved a runway for students in the School of Journalism and Mass Communications. Kornegay’s FAA drone license opens the door for him to teach a new visual communications course in which students will learn to fly camera-equipped drones that have become a go-to tool in documentary making, news gathering, infrastructure inspection, real estate marketing and more.

damaged beach house

Climate change, coastlands and the most vulnerable who live there

June 03, 2021, Chris Horn

A rising tide might lift all boats, but not everyone fares the same with rising seas. Monica Barra has documented that fact extensively in her studies of coastal land loss among communities of color in the bayous of Louisiana. With a focus on the ways that residents, scientific knowledge and the coastal landscape intersect, the assistant professor of race and environment is bringing a similar research perspective to the South Carolina coastline.

A woman and a man make the Wakanda gesture. Man holds a photo of actor Chadwick Boseman.

Colorectal cancer screening recommended at age 45 instead of 50 - it's no fun, but it's worth it

May 25, 2021, Franklin G. Berger

Colorectal cancer remains a major source of cancer incidence and mortality worldwide. The American Cancer Society recently estimated that in 2021, there will be 149,500 new cases of colorectal cancer and 52,980 deaths in the U.S. alone. In The Conversation, Franklin G. Berger, professor emeritus in biological sciences, writes about two significant developments that could save lives.

shelley Welton

Breakthrough Star: Shelley Welton

May 18, 2021, Page Ivey

Shelley Welton wanted no part of the law after watching her mother work tirelessly in children’s law and come up against structural issues that day-to-day lawyering couldn’t fix. But after getting a master’s degree in environmental policy work, she realized that she needed a better understanding of the law to make progress.

person with dark hair in lab wearing lab coat, blue mask and blue gloves

Operations and supply chain project could save lives in cancer clinical trials

May 14, 2021, Marjorie Riddle Duffie

A project by a team of Moore School operations and supply chain students focused on reducing the time it takes to activate industry-sponsored cancer clinical trials. Their recommendations for more efficient processes could get a patient started on a trial before their cancer becomes terminal, and the treatment could be approved faster by the Food and Drug Administration for eligible patients, saving many more lives.

woman wearing glasses in white shirt with red sweater tied around shoulders and holding a walking stick with foliage in the background

Blind poet's writing brings new beauty into focus

April 15, 2021, Bryan Gentry

Ann-Chadwell Humphries hardly touched poetry before she became blind in 2012. Today, she is immersed in South Carolina’s poetry community, and recently published a book titled An Eclipse and a Butcher. The collection of nearly 40 poems touches on topics ranging from art to family life, from eclipses to blindness. She wrote and workshopped some of the poems in graduate classes at the University of South Carolina.

baseball diamond in Truist Park in Atlanta with rain tarp in place and view of skyline in background

MLB's decision to drop Atlanta highlights the economic power companies can wield over lawmakers - when they choose to

April 15, 2021, Benjamin Means

Over 100 companies publicly denounced Georgia’s new restrictive voting law, Major League Baseball went beyond words by moving the 2021 All-Star Game from Atlanta to Denver. In The Conversation, law professor Benjamin Means writes about how corporations use their economic power as leverage to get what they want from lawmakers.

Jaeseung Kim in a suit and tie

COVID-19 Impact: Gender disparities in pandemic's effect

April 14, 2021, Page Ivey

Jaeseung Kim, assistant professor in the College of Social Work since 2018, studies work and caregiving challenges for low-income parents and how work-family policies, both private and public, can help address such challenges. We asked Kim about how the pandemic has affected men and women differently and how to help those suffering the effects.

Friendship 9 students who protested against racial discrimination and were put in prison, Rock Hill, South Carolina, February 1961

'Our ultimate choice is desegregation or disintegration' - recovering the lost words of a jailed civil rights strategist

April 14, 2021, Bobby J. Donaldson and Christopher Frear

In 1961, a group that would come to be known as the “Friendship Nine” hoped to reinvigorate the sit-in movement with a “Jail, No Bail” strategy to push the costs of enforcing segregation onto the city, rather than onto civil rights supporters, who paid substantial bail fees every time students were arrested. Bobby Donaldson, history professor and director of the Center for Civil Rights History and Research, writes about the strategy and a 60-year-old letter by activist Thomas Gaither – arrested with the Friendship Nine during a sit-in in Rock Hill, South Carolina – deep in a records box in the South Caroliniana Library.

woman with brown hair, white shirt and navy jacket with a man's hand on her shoulder

Women frequently experience sexual harassment at work, yet few claims ever reach a courtroom

April 14, 2021, Joseph A. Seiner

Sexual harassment at work is a very common occurrence for women, regardless of age or income level. Among women who have experienced unwanted sexual advances in the workplace, almost all reported that male harassers usually go unpunished. Law professor Joseph Seiner writes in The Conversation about the unfortunate reality that engaging in this conduct will result in no real consequences.

man in blue check shirt and blue jacket with trees in background

Education professor honored for his commitment to empowering teachers

April 07, 2021, Carol J.G. Ward

Most of Barnett Berry’s career has been about advancing what he calls the profession that makes all other professions possible – teaching. As a scholar and researcher, he is an advocate for teachers and how they can and must be more instrumental in the future of education. Berry is the 2021 recipient of the James A. Kelly Award for Advancing Accomplished Teaching.

photo of a bridge over a river with blue sky in the background

Concerts honor frontline workers, aim to strengthen community through music

March 23, 2021, Carol J.G. Ward

Celebrating Local Heroes with The Concert Truck, a series of 10 events performed aboard a mobile music venue will honor 10 frontline heroes with video vignettes that highlight personal stories of sacrifice and courage and live music composed and performed by music students and alumni.

graphic drawing of the coronavirus molecule

COVID-19 impact: Sports and entertainment

March 23, 2021, Allen Wallace

Tom Regan and Nick Watanabe are associate professors of sport and entertainment management in the College of Hospitality, Retail and Sport Management. We talked to them last year about the pandemic’s potential economic impact on the sport and entertainment industry. We caught up with them this spring to find out how things are going and what it will take for the industry to bounce back.

Woman wearing a yellow scarf with blurred background

Education professor fights status quo to make schools more equitable

March 22, 2021, Carol J.G. Ward

For three and a half decades, University of South Carolina education professor Gloria Boutte has dedicated her work to creating school experiences that are more equitable for students of color. Her scholarship, teaching, leadership and service have been recognized with the 2021 Legacy Award from American Educational Research Association.

empty dining room with the alps in the background

COVID-19 impact: Changes in tourism

March 18, 2021, Craig Brandhorst

A year into the COVID-19 pandemic, we asked members of the university community to share their expertise about how the coronavirus has affected all facets of life and offer insights on ways to move forward. Simon Hudson, a professor of tourism in the College of Hospitality, Retail and Sport Management, speaks about COVID-19’s economic impact on the tourism industry.

students walk in building on campus

VIDEO: Team effort allowed students to return to campus in fall

March 18, 2021, Joshua Burrack

From the classroom to the research lab to the front lines of testing and tracing, the University of South Carolina community has taken extraordinary steps over the past year to safeguard its students, faculty and staff in the face of COVID-19. As we mark the one-year point of the pandemic, here’s the third in a three-part video series documenting the resilience, ingenuity and commitment that have guided us through this period.

researchers sample wastewater

COVID video series: Tracking wastewater

March 15, 2021, Joshua Burrack

From the classroom to the research lab to the front lines of testing and tracing, the University of South Carolina community has taken extraordinary steps over the past year to safeguard its students, faculty and staff in the face of COVID-19. As we mark the one-year point of the pandemic, here’s the second in a three-part video series documenting the resilience, ingenuity and commitment that have guided us through this period.

researchers work with test tubes

Resilience, ingenuity define UofSC's COVID response

March 11, 2021, Joshua Burrack

From the classroom to the research lab to the front lines of testing and tracing, the University of South Carolina community has taken extraordinary steps over the past year to safeguard its students, faculty and staff in the face of COVID-19. As we mark the one-year point of the pandemic, here’s the first in a three-part video series documenting the resilience, ingenuity and commitment that have guided us through this period.