Author: Author Listing Page

Mr. Gibson's fifth grade class

Culturally relevant teaching changes the game for students

May 13, 2019, Kathryn McPhail

Jackson Creek Elementary School, in Columbia, is committed to improving the way its teachers are educating students — both academically and socially. The school is collaborating with College of Education professors to offer all teachers and support staff ongoing professional development in culturally relevant teaching.

LeAnn Haga, education alumna

From passion to practice

April 05, 2019, Kathryn McPhail

Efforts to recruit and retain teachers in South Carolina go beyond the four years students spend on campus. For College of Education alumna LeAnn Haga, a high school outreach program inspired her to pursue a teaching career, a scholarship allowed her to earn a degree debt-free and now, her alma mater continues to support her in her first year as a teacher.

Preston Thorne, former athlete

Life after the 4th quarter

February 08, 2019, Kathryn McPhail

Former Gamecocks football player Preston Thorne is back on campus, but now he’s tackling the teacher shortage instead of opponents. Since graduating 15 year ago, Thorne has taught history, coached high school football and even co-authored a children's book. Now, he's helping the College of Education recruit more students to the teaching profession.

Teacher in clasroom with student

A teacher's path home

January 14, 2019, Kathryn McPhail

When Michelle Taylor walked across the stage at December’s commencement ceremony to accept her master’s degree, she culminated a journey of more than 7,300 miles and three countries. And though she didn’t step foot on campus during her two years in the Master of Education in Teaching program, she felt strongly about attending graduation.

education course at USC

Filling the void

September 18, 2018, Kathryn McPhail

South Carolina is in critical need of special educators, with special education vacancies making up the largest share – nearly 20 percent - of unfilled teaching positions last year. To tackle this growing issue, the College of Education is launching a new certificate program for both early childhood education undergraduate students as well as current teachers.

Marisa Green

Getting at the core of the issue

August 09, 2018, Kathryn McPhail

To increase diversity among South Carolina’s teachers while also tackling the growing teacher shortage, the College of Education is launching the Apple Core Initiative. Ten students, including Marisa Green, will take part in the pilot program which provides scholarships and support for underrepresented populations in South Carolina.

New teacher works with students

New retention program earns A+ from teachers

July 19, 2018, Kathryn McPhail

A new College of Education program aimed at increasing teacher retention in South Carolina proves successful in its first year - with 100 percent of participating teachers returning to the classroom next school year. This fall, 50 additional teachers will enter the program, and a $600,000 grant will help the college research the effectiveness of teacher recruitment and retention efforts statewide.

David Dutka

From custodian to teacher

June 07, 2018, Kathryn McPhail

In May, David Dutka earned a bachelor’s degree in elementary education through Palmetto College, the University of South Carolina’s online degree completion program. In August, he will begin his first year as a teacher at Midway Elementary School – the same school where he repaired pipes and buffed floors as a custodian for several years.

Erica Page

Turning children into leaders and learners

April 18, 2018, Kathryn McPhail

University of South Carolina College of Education alumna and Pelion High School assistant principal, Erica Page, was named the 2018 National Assistant Principal of the Year. Though not a South Carolina native, Page began her career in education a decade ago in Lexington County after an adventurous 650-mile move south.

Noyce scholar in class

Solving the equation

March 09, 2018, Kathryn McPhail

Though the College of Education is graduating an increasing number of science and math educators, the state – and nation – is still in desperate need of these teachers. To encourage more students to considering teaching science and math, Carolina is offering top students scholarships which are funded by a National Science Foundation grant program.

Tori Vaeth at hotel

The 'SEARCH' for purpose

January 12, 2018, Kathryn McPhail

A cherished, childhood friendship led Tori Vaeth to study special education at the University of South Carolina. Now, the College of Education double alumna is leading a program that’s training and placing young adults with intellectual disabilities in rewarding careers.

Dr. Ross

A thousand passions, 1 heartbeat

October 20, 2017, Kathryn McPhail

University of South Carolina College of Education alumnus and Chapin High School principal, Akil Ross, was named the 2018 National Principal of the Year on Friday, October 20. The honor is the culmination of a passionate career as an educator that began just a few miles away from our campus 16 years ago.

Brandon Harrison in class

Advancing educational equity for African-American children

October 11, 2017, Kathryn McPhail

Rapping the words to the U.S. Constitution might seem odd — unless you’re a student in one of Brandon Harrison’s classes. Harrison, and other public school teachers, are collaborating with education professors here at Carolina to identify which methods work best when teaching African-American students.

Binda in Senegal

From refugee to global education advocate

September 22, 2017, Kathryn McPhail

At just 6 years old, Noella “Binda” Niati was forced to flee her home in the Democratic Republic of Congo, amid intense violence and political upheaval. More than two decades later, she is headed back to Africa to study ways to encourage children, especially girls, to stay in school longer.

jeffries

When tracking math students doesn't add up

July 21, 2017, Kathryn McPhail

Education professor Rhonda Jeffries and graduate student Hope Reed wanted to close the achievement gap for underrepresented students, specifically those tracked to be in remedial classes. So, they took a risk with a group of freshman students at Blythewood High School and conducted a secret experiment of sorts that proved to be powerful.

Student works on reading

The hidden parents of South Carolina

June 26, 2017, Kathryn McPhail

Raised by a Cuban father and Colombian mother in Boston, Massachusetts, Julia López-Robertson experienced first-hand the challenges that come with being a member of an underrepresented population in America. Now as a professor in the College of Education, she is helping other Latino families through her research and outreach.

nsf grant

USC researchers land $1.3 million grant to enhance STEM education

May 03, 2017, Kathryn McPhail

Researchers from the School of Medicine and College of Education recently received a $1.3 million National Science Foundation grant to study the best ways to encourage students to pursue careers in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) through participation at informal learning sites.

beasley

Planting a love of learning

March 27, 2017, Kathryn McPhail

A self-proclaimed “outdoorsy” person, Todd Beasley started his own small business at just 10 years old gardening for other families in his neighborhood. Now three decades later, the College of Education alumnus is the new director of programs at one of the largest botanical gardens in the country — the San Antonio Botanical Gardens.

bailly schloss

Alumna's work with Holocaust exhibit shapes her teaching

February 16, 2017, Kathryn McPhail

When high school math teacher Morgan Bailey steps in front of her class in rural Walterboro, South Carolina, she worries that some of the faces looking back at her may not graduate. Bailey is trying to enrich her students learning by sharing her experiences as a former intern with the Anne Frank House in Amsterdam and through her friendship with Holocaust survivor Eva Schloss.