Recent Stories

Tim Mousseau

Breakthrough Leader: Tim Mousseau

July 12, 2019, Page Ivey

One way or another, most life on Earth is affected when one of humanity’s most volatile inventions — the nuclear power plant — catastrophically fails. Biology professor Tim Mousseau leads a team of researchers studying the impact of radiation released from those disasters on animal life, including insects, birds, dogs and humans who live near the failed power plants.

portrait of Sarah Kelly in the mail room

The Long Run: Sarah Kelly

June 27, 2019, Page Ivey

They arrived in the 1970s, some after serving in Vietnam, some fresh out of high school or college. More than 40 years later, they still come to work at the University of South Carolina — some after officially “retiring.” TIMES spoke with a few of these long-term employees to see what keeps them coming back to work on campus, long after they could have settled into that place in the mountains or that home by the sea.

Immigrant school children

Social workers play key role in immigrant students' success

June 18, 2019, Chris Horn

About one-quarter of children in the U.S. under the age of 18 are immigrants or the children of immigrants, a status that often translates into educational disadvantages. A College of Social Work faculty member is involved in surveying school social workers nationwide to learn what they are doing to help those children navigate successfully through their public school experiences.

Portrait of Diane Wise

The Long Run: Diane Wise

June 13, 2019, Page Ivey

They arrived in the 1970s, some after serving in Vietnam, some fresh out of high school or college. More than 40 years later, they still come to work at the University of South Carolina — some after officially “retiring.” TIMES spoke with a few of these long-term employees to see what keeps them coming back to work on campus, long after they could have settled into that place in the mountains or that home by the sea.

Uzbekistan plaza

Retailing professor wins Fulbright for work in Uzbekistan

June 04, 2019, Allen Wallace

The Fulbright program is one of the most famous and prestigious scholarship programs in the world, with 59 alumni who also have Nobel Prizes and 82 Pulitzer Prize winners. Many people in academia try throughout their career and never win a Fulbright Scholarship. Professor Mark Rosenbaum, chair of the University of South Carolina Department of Retailing, now has three.

artificial intellingence illustration

Turning big data into smart data

May 29, 2019, Chris Horn

A new Artificial Intelligence Institute at the University of South Carolina will launch this summer, building on and harnessing the collective efforts of dozens of faculty members who already are advancing AI research initiatives in diverse academic disciplines.

portrait of Allen Stokes at work

The Long Run: Allen Stokes

May 29, 2019, Page Ivey

They arrived in the 1970s, some after serving in Vietnam, some fresh out of high school or college. More than 40 years later, they still come to work at the University of South Carolina — some after officially “retiring.” TIMES spoke with a few of these long-term employees to see what keeps them coming back to work on campus, long after they could have settled into that place in the mountains or that home by the sea.

Katy Pilarzyk in the lab

Brain Power

May 23, 2019, Alyssa Yancey

Second-year Ph.D. candidate Katy Pilarzyk was one of three University of South Carolina students awarded a prestigious NSF Graduate Research Fellowship this year. She will use her funding to continue her work in Michy Kelly’s lab at the School of Medicine Columbia. The lab studies the inner workings of the brain to better understand the molecular mechanisms underlying social and cognitive deficits.

portrait of Donald Baldwin at work

The Long Run: Donald Baldwin

May 21, 2019, Page Ivey

They arrived in the 1970s, some after serving in Vietnam, some fresh out of high school or college. More than 40 years later, they still come to work at the University of South Carolina — some after officially “retiring.” TIMES spoke with a few of these long-term employees to see what keeps them coming back to work on campus, long after they could have settled into that place in the mountains or that home by the sea.

libby foreman

The Long Run: Libby Foreman

May 20, 2019, Page Ivey

They arrived in the 1970s, some after serving in Vietnam, some fresh out of high school or college. More than 40 years later, they still come to work at the University of South Carolina — some after officially “retiring.” TIMES spoke with a few of these long-term employees to see what keeps them coming back to work on campus, long after they could have settled into that place in the mountains or that home by the sea.

Brainard Cooper

Fellowship honors impact of longtime athletic trainer

May 15, 2019, David Lee

Longtime athletic trainer Brainard Cooper was joined by family, friends, colleagues and Arnold School of Public Health faculty members as they unveiled the Brainard Cooper Athletic Training Fellowship on April 20 at Founders Park. The fellowship will include support for students and faculty in addition to equipment and other needs within the Arnold School’s renowned athletic training programs.

Mr. Gibson's fifth grade class

Culturally relevant teaching changes the game for students

May 13, 2019, Kathryn McPhail

Jackson Creek Elementary School, in Columbia, is committed to improving the way its teachers are educating students — both academically and socially. The school is collaborating with College of Education professors to offer all teachers and support staff ongoing professional development in culturally relevant teaching.

adriana bowman camel

First-generation student takes on the world

April 29, 2019, Carol J.G. Ward

Honors College junior Adriana Bowman is one of 30 recipients nationwide of the Pickering Fellowship awarded to students interested in a foreign service career. Multiple study abroad experiences have allowed the S.C. native to immerse herself in foreign languages and cultures.

cloud computing

Need for speed

April 02, 2019, Chris Horn

They don’t look like a NASCAR pit crew, but South Carolina's Research Computing team is speeding up the data-crunching capabilities of UofSC scientists, bringing faster analytical results and more efficient computing to those who work with very large and complex data sets.

scholars studying medieval manuscripts

Unlocking a mystery

March 28, 2019, Annika Dahlgren

For the past eight years, people from around the world have gathered at the University of South Carolina’s Hollings Library to experience the wonder of medieval manuscripts, and this year is no different. The ninth annual Medieval Manuscripts Symposium will take place April 1-2. “Understanding the Medieval Book,” is a two-day seminar dedicated to learning about the care, keeping, and understanding of medieval manuscripts.

New music explores Confederate monuments

'Red Hot Sun Turning Over'

March 26, 2019, Megan Sexton

A new composition, "Red Hot Sun Turning Over," by School of Music assistant professor David Garner uses music, sounds and images from the Civil War era and the early 20th century to explore the story of Confederate monuments. It will be premiered Sunday (March 31) at the Koger Center.

global footprint map

Global footprint

March 04, 2019, Craig Brandhorst

The University of South Carolina has been a global player for a long time. But since 2011, when the Focus Carolina strategic plan was announced, the university has significantly increased its internationalization efforts, transforming a healthy overseas presence into a clearly defined global footprint.

Students working at Colonial Life Arena during a South Carolina basketball game

March Madness in Columbia

March 01, 2019, Allen Wallace

This month, for the first time in almost 50 years, March Madness returns to Columbia, South Carolina, with the city chosen as a host site for the first and second rounds of the NCAA Division I Men’s Basketball Tournament. As fan excitement builds, faculty in the University of South Carolina’s sport and entertainment management department share their expertise on what the event will mean for the city and the campus community.

fighting fake news

All the news that isn't

February 13, 2019, Craig Brandhorst

In the age of social media, it can be hard to tell truth from fiction. And when it comes to news — particularly if it’s related to a hot button political issue — fake news increasingly gets peddled as real news while real news gets maligned as fake. Enter Mo Jang, an assistant professor in the School of Journalism and Mass Communications, and mass communication Ph.D. student Jo-Yun “Queenie” Li. Jang and Li were part of a research team that looked at the origins and spread of fake news on Twitter.

antibiotic-resistant bacteria

The growing resistance

February 12, 2019, Chris Horn

Antibiotic resistance, a public health threat that already endangers millions worldwide, is on track to become a much deadlier problem in the years ahead. Part of the challenge, says a University of South Carolina public health scientist, is that bacterial resistance to antibiotic medications is fostered not only in clinical settings but also in the environment.

Cheedy Jaja and child at Sierra Leone clinic

Committed to service

February 08, 2019, Laura Kammerer

At the height of the Ebola epidemic in 2014, Cheedy Jaja traded the relative comforts of American health care practice for Tyvek bodysuits and chlorine baths. Now the Sierra Leonean native is committed to a new mission: to bolster the early diagnosis and treatment of sickle cell disease in children.

Susan O'Malley with female sport and entertainment management students

New internship supports women in sport management

February 01, 2019, Allen Wallace

The University of South Carolina and Monumental Sports & Entertainment are proud to announce a new internship program for female students majoring in sport and entertainment management. The partnership will provide four paid internships per year to advance students’ career experience and develop the industry’s future leaders.

andreas heyden

The ultimate recycle

January 24, 2019, Chris Horn

Most of us look at a pile of mulch and see ground-up tree bark and wood fibers. Andreas Heyden sees a potential energy source. The chemical engineering professor’s research is focused on developing specialized catalysts capable of breaking down biomass such as mulch and animal waste into renewable fuels.

allen montgomery

Moving on up

January 17, 2019, Chris Horn

Allen Montgomery could do a fair impersonation of the Energizer bunny — he just keeps going and going. The 80-year-old audiology professor in the Arnold School of Public Health has run more than 100 marathons, the last one just a couple of years ago, and he has no immediate plans for retirement. He’s even figured out a creative way to help his academic department consolidate in one space on campus — something that’s never happened since communication sciences and disorders was created as an academic unit in 1972.

Christian Cicimurri

Touching the past

January 15, 2019, Chris Horn

As curator of collections at McKissick Museum, Christian Cicimurri is accustomed to handling old documents and artifacts. But thanks to an ASPIRE II grant and subsequent funding from the Institute of Museum and Library Services, Cicimurri has got her hands on new touch screen technology, which is being incorporated into McKissick’s exhibits.

virginia shervette

Fishing for information

January 11, 2019, Chris Horn

When Virginia Shervette hangs a ‘GONE FISHING’ sign on her door, it’s more than an afternoon jaunt. The USC Aiken fisheries biologist investigates the health of commercial and recreational fish populations in the Caribbean basin in hopes that fisheries managers will use the information when developing accurate assessments of which species are being overfished.

digital transformation lab

The next big thing(s)

December 31, 2018, Page Ivey

The university has entered two new partnerships — the Industrial Internet of Things Research Lab, which is a partnership with IBM, and the 15,000-square-foot Digital Transformation Lab, which will serve as a research showplace for projects with an array of real-world industrial and consumer applications. USC Times asked Bill Kirkland, director of the Office of Economic Engagement, to help us understand both ventures.

Creative degree programs

USC Creativity

December 03, 2018, Megan Sexton

The university has established several new degree programs that illustrate creative curricula by adding innovation, an entrepreneurial approach or other types of value to traditional degrees.

international space station

Supplying Outer Space

November 26, 2018, C. Grant Jackson

With growing private investment and a developing private commercial industry, outer space is also becoming in some sense just another place to do business. With that realization also comes the need to address the same operations management and supply chain issues that businesses face on Earth, says Joel Wooten, assistant professor of management science at the Darla Moore School of Business.

Saurabh Chatterjee

Gut feeling

November 07, 2018, Chris Horn

In the nearly 30 years since the first Gulf War in Kuwait and Iraq, medical professionals have struggled to identify the cause for symptoms collectively referred to as Gulf War illness that have persisted among a quarter-million military veterans. Saurabh Chatterjee can’t identify the cause, but he thinks his research team at USC’s Arnold School of Public Health has found the locus of medical dysfunction.

Bobby Donaldson

Telling the untold

October 24, 2018, Megan Sexton

As he conducted research for the civil rights history project Columbia SC 63, history professor Bobby Donaldson started discovering largely untold stories about the struggle as it played out in Columbia. The material he and his students unearthed and the people he met helped guide the formation of the South Carolina Center for Civil Rights History and Research.

frankenstein

Celebrating 200 years of 'Frankenstein'

October 23, 2018, Page Ivey and Joshua Burrack

“Frankenstein,” Mary Shelley’s tale of a scientist pushing the boundaries of knowledge and ethics to reanimate lifeless flesh, turns 200 this year, and the University of South Carolina is celebrating the anniversary by reaching into its rare books collection and tapping faculty expertise to tell the story of Mary Shelley, Victor Frankenstein and the creature that has spawned many reincarnations throughout popular literature, film and television.