Author: Author Listing Page

War Memorial garden

A century of remembrance

November 09, 2018, Chris Horn

Carolina recently relocated a group of granite-and-bronze markers that memorialize 28 students and alumni who died during World War I and the Mexican border dispute. Thirteen markers have been placed on the front lawn of the War Memorial Building (Sumter at Pendleton), and plans call for installation of 15 more to replace markers that were lost decades ago.

Saurabh Chatterjee

Gut feeling

November 07, 2018, Chris Horn

In the nearly 30 years since the first Gulf War in Kuwait and Iraq, medical professionals have struggled to identify the cause for symptoms collectively referred to as Gulf War illness that have persisted among a quarter-million military veterans. Saurabh Chatterjee can’t identify the cause, but he thinks his research team at USC’s Arnold School of Public Health has found the locus of medical dysfunction.

Wendy Bashnan

A Gamecock abroad

August 01, 2018, Chris Horn

Wendy Bashnan’s career began in her rural S.C. hometown 25 years ago, but quickly sprouted wings. Since 1994, she’s worked in Washington, D.C., Miami, and New York, and has spent more than half of her professional life abroad in South America, Asia, Africa, the Middle East and Europe.

Black hawk helicopter over campus on Engineering Day

Big data to the rescue

June 26, 2018, Chris Horn

University of South Carolina researchers across multiple disciplines are putting data analytics to work to tackle an array of real-world challenges — from keeping helicopters flying safely to improving health care and detecting deadly fungal outbreaks in corn.

migraine illustration

No pain, no migraine

June 21, 2018, Chris Horn

Michelle Androulakis understands the debilitating pain of migraine headaches and is looking for ways to help fellow sufferers. The neurologist and med school professor has conducted clinical trials for a non-invasive migraine procedure involving a tiny nasal catheter as well as for a new migraine drug.

Thomas Makris

Nature made

June 01, 2018, Chris Horn

It sounds like a motorist's dream come true: Microorganisms that make gasoline. If you think it sounds farfetched, talk to Tom Makris. The assistant professor of chemistry is focusing his research on natural product biosynthesis pathways, which include not only fuel-producing microbes but also the antibiotic-making capabilities of microorganisms.

Steinway piano

A grand gift

May 30, 2018, Chris Horn

The definition of a grand piano is simple — a large piano with the body, strings and soundboard arranged horizontally and supported by three legs. But what makes a piano “grand?” Willson Powell and Karen Brosius can point to the piano they bought 37 years ago — and have now donated to the University of South Carolina's School of Music.

James Cutsinger

Final exam

May 29, 2018, Chris Horn

Religious studies professor James Cutsinger has wrestled with life’s deep questions of sin, faith and suffering, pondering the existence of God and the meaning of life with thousands of students over the course of nearly four decades at the University of South Carolina. Now, at age 65, Cutsinger is facing a final exam of sorts — the test of his own theological insights in the face of a stage IV cancer diagnosis.

Beau Bergman

Gamecock at birth

May 25, 2018, Chris Horn

Beau Bergman is still several months shy of his first birthday, but he already has an indelible connection to Carolina. The little guy rocks a garnet-and-black sweatshirt and baseball cap, and he’s tailgated with some of the university’s most dedicated fans.

Mitzi Nagarkatti

Breakthrough Leader: Mitzi Nagarkatti

April 27, 2018, Chris Horn

When Mitzi Nagarkatti joined the School of Medicine as chair of pathology, microbiology and immunology in 2005, the department was bringing in about $600,000 a year in NIH funding, 81st among all such departments across the nation. The department now garners some $9.5 million per year in NIH grants (No. 17 in the country) and Nagarkatti continues to build research capacity not only in that unit but in the entire School of Medicine and across the university.

Parastoo Hashemi

Breakthrough Star: Parastoo Hashemi

April 20, 2018, Chris Horn

Parastoo Hashemi wants to know what's going on inside our heads — neurochemically speaking, that is — and she and her research team are well on their way toward figuring out how to do it. Her pioneering research on measuring neurochemical levels in the brain have far-reaching implications for treatment of depression and other neurological conditions such as Parkinson's disease.

Give 4 Garnet sign

A day of giving

April 12, 2018, Chris Horn

Give 4 Garnet Day, April 18, is an opportunity for alumni, students, faculty, staff and friends of the University of South Carolina to support their favorite programs.

Richard T. Greener

Larger than life

February 21, 2018, Chris Horn

Richard T. Greener’s larger-than-life story is one of academic achievement, professional success and civic service, played out mostly in the tumultuous years after the Civil War. It’s a story of firsts — in addition to being USC’s first black professor, Greener was also Harvard’s first black graduate and America’s first black diplomat to a country of white citizenry.

Freeze-dried crickets

Guess what's coming to dinner

January 25, 2018, Chris Horn

Insects are regularly consumed by an estimated 2 billion people, a practice that has its roots in culture and sometimes necessity. Law professor Marie Boyd studies the regulation of insects as food as part of her research on the Food and Drug Administration. She says insect-based food has a long way to go, both from a cultural and regulatory standpoint, in the U.S.

Russ Meekins

Remembering Russ Meekins

January 18, 2018, Chris Horn

The university community is invited to a celebration of life at 10 a.m. Tuesday, Jan. 23 in the My Carolina Alumni Center in memory of Russ Meekins, executive director of University Foundations who died unexpectedly Dec. 23.

ultrasound education

The curious case of Marcus Brown

January 09, 2018, Chris Horn

Marcus Brown is a fictional high school student athlete whose medical history is the centerpiece of a teaching module in anatomy and biology courses at 20 middle and high schools that participated in a joint venture with USC’s School of Medicine and the College of Education. The project gives students an interesting case study that guides them through an exploration of various physiological conditions that might have contributed to the star athlete’s untimely death.

Ben Maronites

Nothing but blue skies

January 02, 2018, Chris Horn

The forecast for Benjamin Marosites’ professional goals while attending Carolina went from “foggy” to “sunny and clear” in just one semester. The undeclared major enrolled in the geography department’s weather and climate course, which ignited his curiosity about meteorology, prompted him to change majors and helped launch his career as an emergency planner for Richland County.

Billy Buckner

Comeback win

December 12, 2017, Chris Horn

It’s been 13 years since Billy Buckner played baseball for the University of South Carolina, memorably striking out 16 batters one afternoon against Clemson and winning seven games in the 2004 season. Now, after taking several online classes and on campus, he has a bachelor’s in interdisciplinary studies from the College of Hospitality, Retail and Sport Management.

karate kids

The karate kids

December 04, 2017, Chris Horn

The martial arts craze of the 1970s had hundreds of students signing up for Carolina's karate course. Many of those students including Keith Vitali and his younger brother, Steve, competed successfully in tournaments around the country, making Columbia and the University of South Carolina an important center of karate competition.

Breathe Easier

Breathe easier

October 31, 2017, Chris Horn

Just because lung cancer patients are living longer and sometimes even cured of the disease, long-term survivors of the disease often cope with distressing symptoms such as shortness of breath, fatigue, depression and anxiety. Karen Kane McDonnell, a nursing professor in USC’s College of Nursing, plans to test an intervention to reduce their symptom burden.

Xiaoming Li

Fighting disease with data

October 25, 2017, Chris Horn

Without consistent medical supervision, HIV patients remain infectious and often have dire health outcomes. But two Arnold School of Public Health professors and an interdisciplinary team from the University of South Carolina have a plan to help reduce HIV infections in South Carolina and make medical care more responsive for those diagnosed with HIV/AIDS.

time travelers

Time travelers

October 03, 2017, Chris Horn

USC astronomy professor Steve Rodney and doctoral student Justin Roberts-Pierel are part of a NASA-funded project that could locate stellar explosions so far away that their light has taken more than 13 billion years to reach us. That means those stars exploded — give or take a few million years — near the dawn of time.

Dave Robbins

Nature's palette

September 27, 2017, Chris Horn

University horticulturalist Dave Robbins creates artistry in gardens — and on canvasses with paint. Check out his chalkboard art at the School of Music library this fall.

Emily Suski and Lisa Martin

Clinical approach

September 19, 2017, Chris Horn

The School of Law is launching two new legal clinics this academic year. A medicolegal clinic will team law students with medical students, medical residents and physicians to improve health outcomes for pediatric patients, while a domestic violence clinic will focus on protection, advocacy and community education.

Aramark food services

Bon appétit!

August 29, 2017, Chris Horn

USC’s new food service contract with Aramark promises to bring big changes to the campus dining scene, both in restaurant options and dining facilities.One of the highlights of the 15-year contract is $79 million in dining facility improvements and new construction

mancke

Going dark

August 20, 2017, Chris Horn

Naturalist-in-residence Rudy Mancke has never witnessed a total solar eclipse, so he’s especially looking forward to the Aug. 21 event, not only to see what’s happening in the sky but to learn how it affects the animal life he’s studied for so long

ptsd

Cause and reflect

August 09, 2017, Chris Horn

An innovative program at the Richland County Sheriff’s Department aims to prevent post-traumatic stress disorder among its officers — and change the culture in law enforcement that makes it difficult to ask for help.

health center

Wellness revealed

August 01, 2017, Chris Horn

With its soothing interior colors, lush plants, comfy seating and walls of windows, the new student health center might become the next cool place for students to hang out. And if that happens, executive director of student health services Debbie Beck will be more than a little pleased.

Cold Case

Solving the cold case

May 23, 2017, Chris Horn

Established about three years ago in the Children’s Law Center with funding from the Casey Family Programs, Cold Case goes to bat for S.C. children who have lingered in foster care for years. The goal is to help them to be adopted or to establish meaningful contact with a family member or adult friend who will be there for them down the road.

Norma Frizzell

Breakthrough Star: Norma Frizzell

March 24, 2017, Chris Horn

If a key component in a car goes bad, the car won’t go for long. That’s roughly what happens in the human body when mutations and other insults disrupt the mitochondria, the essential energy-making components of human cells. Norma Frizzell has devoted much of her career to understanding how and why mitochondria go haywire and sometimes lead to fatal maladies.

adam reiss

Why the universe is accelerating

January 10, 2017, Chris Horn

Nearly 90 years ago, astronomer Edwin Hubble discovered that the universe is expanding. Now we know, thanks to research by Adam Riess and other scientists, that this cosmic expansion is speeding up. The Nobel-winning astrophysicist will explain the phenomenon of a faster-expanding universe in a Jan. 17 public lecture at Carolina.

Mindy Castles

A southern connection

January 09, 2017, Chris Horn

Mindy and Jack Castles made Beaufort, S.C., their home in retirement. So when it was time to donate Jack's extensive collection of Civil War documents, USC Beaufort was the natural selection.

inspired teaching

Inspired teaching

January 03, 2017, Chris Horn

Helping faculty members build online and blended courses is only one aspect of the Center for Teaching Excellence, an initiative the university launched 10 years ago as part of a broader effort to enhance student learning by fostering a culture of effective and innovative teaching.

WWII platoon

The day everything changed

December 06, 2016, Chris Horn

Franklin D. Roosevelt called it “a date which will live in infamy” — Dec. 7, 1941, the day Japan attacked the U.S. Navy base at Pearl Harbor, dragging America into a cataclysmic world war and dramatically altering the course of history. For USC students like Jim Pearce, the event had personal ramifications, as the immediate effect of the Sunday morning attack changed the mood on campus from pre-holiday gaiety to frenetic patriotism.

michael dowdy

Expanding the literary canon

October 09, 2016, Chris Horn

For Michael Dowdy, there’s a familiar ring to this year’s political rhetoric about border walls and deportation of Latinos. “Latinos have a different story than most in coming to the United States and a unique perspective on the American dream,” says Dowdy, a recently appointed associate professor whose specialty is Latino literature and poetry.

ultrasound

An insider view

August 17, 2016, Chris Horn

From the start of their medical studies, students in the School of Medicine in Columbia begin learning to use ultrasound, which can image all major organs, as well as joints and blood vessels, at the bedside. It’s one of the school’s distinctions, being the first institution in the nation to integrate ultrasound instruction into all four years of its curriculum.

From left, Carolyn Morris, Christopher Church, Kristen Seay, Cynthia Flinn

Saving Elyse

June 14, 2016, Chris Horn

The Cold Case Project, an initiative in the Children’s Law Center, focuses on a select group of adolescents who have lingered in the S.C. foster system and are at risk for aging out of foster care without achieving legal permanency — that is, without a family. Partnering with DSS and the family courts, Cold Case staff find ways to reunite these at-risk foster children with responsible family members or to match them with a new family. With children’s lives at stake, giving up is not an option.

Ralph White, chemical engineering professor

Research leadership by the numbers

June 08, 2016, Chris Horn

Ralph White’s story could be told in numbers — journal papers published, graduate students who completed their degrees under his tutelage, or years of service as a department chair and dean and mentor and colleague. Or it could be told in international honors. Whatever the case, it's easy to see why he is a recipient of the 2016 Leadership in Research Award.

Harvie Nachlinger

Last call

May 04, 2016, Chris Horn

Carolina is one of the few large public universities that still announces each graduate by name at its commencement ceremonies, even as the number of graduates has increased dramatically in recent years. For Harvie Nachlinger, it’s just a matter of speed and diction to enunciate each student's name.

Florence med school campus

Side by side

April 12, 2016, Chris Horn

It’s probably not a record, but third-year medical student Dustin Rawlinson still marvels at how much experience he got in his recent obstetrics rotation — delivering 20 babies in two weeks. Rawlinson is among the inaugural cohort of M-III students at the School of Medicine’s Florence regional campus, and they and the other M-IIIs are getting a full dose of hands-on learning.

Stranded boat after Hurricane Katrina

Earth, wind and fire

February 15, 2016, Chris Horn

If it's a disaster, whether natural or manmade, the Hazards and Vulnerabilities Research Lab at the University of South Carolina has probably considered the ramifications of it from every angle. It's what they do — studying vulnerability to potential disasters across the U.S. while also interpreting data from past disasters.