Author: Author Listing Page

A portrait of Leroy Chapman.

Atlanta Journal-Constitution editor-in-chief Leroy Chapman inspires next generation of journalists

January 22, 2024, Craig Brandhorst

In March 2023, University of South Carolina alumnus Leroy Chapman Jr. made headlines — as the first person of color to be named editor-in-chief of the Atlanta Journal-Constitution. It was a big deal for the 155-year-old paper, for the city of Atlanta and for journalism in general. It was also a big deal for Chapman’s alma mater, which recognized his professional achievements with the 2023 College of Arts and Sciences Dean’s Award.

Joe Rice with his wife at the law school dedication ceremony.

USC's newly named Joseph F. Rice School of Law reflects powerhouse attorney's ambition, philanthropy and commitment to the profession

January 17, 2024, Craig Brandhorst

Attorney Joe Rice is one of the most respected plaintiff’s attorneys in the country. The cofounder of the Charleston-based Motley Rice law firm has secured hundreds of billions of dollars for clients, taking on Goliath-sized opponents like Big Tobacco and the financiers of 9/11.

Humpy Wheeler poses at the Charlotte Motor Speedway.

Legendary NASCAR promoter Humpy Wheeler looks back at his career in racing and his days as a Gamecock in the 1950s

January 09, 2024, Craig Brandhorst

From 1975 to 2008, Humpy Wheeler, ’61, journalism, was president and general manager of the Charlotte Motor Speedway. And over those three high-octane, pedal-to-the-metal decades, he came to be regarded as one of the most colorful promoters in NASCAR history.

Seth Rose and his family photographed on the Horseshoe.

Alumnus and tennis standout Seth Rose gives back -- and not just for racket sports.

November 08, 2023, Craig Brandhorst

Seth Rose, ’03, was a first team All-American in men’s tennis, and he paid his alma mater back by helping finance two courts on campus But Rose’s love for the Gamecocks extends beyond tennis. The 2014 Gamecock Athletics Hall of Fame inductee is also a huge Gamecock football fan, and his philanthropy reflects it.

Jennifer Asouzu, assistant director for special populations and communication with New Student Orientation, talks partnerships and first impressions.

The Happiest Lunch on Earth

June 26, 2023, Craig Brandhorst

On the last Friday before the end of classes, USC TIMES invited three staff members to lunch at McCutchen House’s Garden Grill to discuss how our work lives change — or don’t change — over the summer. George Hendry, director of the McCutchen House and senior lecturer in the School of Hospitality and Tourism Management, shared his thoughts on troubleshooting through teamwork. Jennifer Asouzu, assistant director for special populations and communication with New Student Orientation, talked up partnerships and first impressions. Leroy Sims, a custodial zone manager with Facilities and a member of Staff Senate, discussed employee satisfaction and how to make the USC campus the happiest place on Earth.

The outline of a teacher in chalk on a blackboard.

Education professor's new book examines the chronic shortage of public school teachers

January 04, 2023, Craig Brandhorst

It’s no secret: public school teachers are leaving the profession at an alarming rate. “How Did We Get Here? The Decay of the Teaching Profession” (Information Age Publishing, 2022), edited by University of South Carolina associate professor of education Henry Tran and Iowa State University associate professor Douglas A. Smith, explores the causes and consequences of teacher attrition in South Carolina as a way to shed light on the larger crisis affecting America’s schools.

portrait of Kirstin Dow

Geography professor maps heat islands as we adapt to climate change

November 16, 2022, Craig Brandhorst

Longtime University of South Carolina geography professor Kirstin Dow has devoted much of her career to understanding climate impact, vulnerability and adaptation. In other words, she recognizes the problems posed by our warming planet and is determined to help mitigate them, most recently by mapping heat islands so that urban planners can make better decisions about where to plant trees, generate more shade or support investment in affordable renewable energy and energy efficiency.

VPR Julius Fridriksson

New vice president for research aims to mentor junior faculty

October 03, 2022, Craig Brandhorst

Julius Fridriksson loves a challenge. After climbing to the top of his field — and building out a research team of more than 40 faculty, post docs and graduate students at the Arnold School of Public Health — the onetime first-generation college student from a small village in Iceland agreed to become USC’s interim vice president for research in 2021.

Ed Madden

For scholar and poet Ed Madden, going public is the name of the game

May 24, 2022, Craig Brandhorst

Ed Madden is well known on the University of South Carolina campus as the director of the Women’s and Gender Studies program and as a dynamic classroom instructor. He is just as well-known as a creative writer and arts advocate in Columbia, South Carolina, where he is wrapping up his term as the capital city’s inaugural poet laureate.

graduate wears cap and gown at a commencement ceremony

Dimitri Amiridis discusses family's many ties to UofSC

May 03, 2022, Craig Brandhorst

When computer engineering major Dimitri Amiridis crosses the stage at commencement this spring, the South Carolina Honors College graduate will become the third member of his family with a degree from the University of South Carolina. The only member of his immediate family not to hold a degree from his new alma mater? Dimitri’s father, university President-elect Michael Amiridis.

Michael Amiridis smiles for the camera with Chicago skyline in background

Michael Amiridis has many reasons to return to UofSC

May 02, 2022, Craig Brandhorst

Incoming University of South Carolina President Michael Amiridis is going to miss the University of Illinois Chicago, but he has zero misgivings about the new job. In fact, the former UofSC faculty member-turned-administrator is thrilled to return to the campus where he cut his academic teeth.

QR code abstract

The Best of Times?

April 25, 2022, Craig Brandhorst

A lot happens over the course of an academic year, and there’s absolutely no way to highlight everything. So, no, don’t think of this as a Best Of list. This is merely a smattering of the achievements and memorable moments that defined 2021-22, a small taste of the year that was. Trust us, there’s plenty more where this came from — and plenty more to come.

Adel Nasiri

New faculty spotlight: Adel Nasiri

November 19, 2021, Craig Brandhorst

Adel Nasiri joined the University of South Carolina as a distinguished professor of electrical engineering in August, following a 16-year career at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. His research on energy conversion, microgrids and batteries has taken on added import as sustainability, efficiency and resilience efforts ramp up during the age of climate change.

Thomas Crocker smiling

Constitutional law scholar discusses his new book on presidential powers

October 18, 2021, Craig Brandhorst

Law professor Thomas Crocker specializes in constitutional law, criminal procedure, free speech and democracy, national security and the Constitution. His new book, "Overcoming Necessity: Emergency, Constraint, and the Meanings of American Constitutionalism" (Yale University Press) is an analysis of how the concept of necessity, in conflict with constitutional commitments, creates dynamic challenges to constitutional governance, especially during times of emergency.

Marva Smalls in her office at ViacomCBS

Alumna plays crucial role in media company's inclusion efforts

September 21, 2021, Craig Brandhorst

As an executive vice president and global head of inclusion at ViacomCBS, Marva Smalls plays a crucial role in the company’s diversity, equity and inclusion efforts. And while her commitment to advocacy predates her time at the University of South Carolina, Smalls’ undergraduate and graduate experiences shaped her philosophy in profound ways.

Jamy Claire Archer stands in the COMD lab

Hindsight 2020: The therapist

September 01, 2021, Craig Brandhorst

Singers, teachers and public speakers can feel the effects of the pandemic, whether or not they contract the virus. Enter clinical professor of communication sciences and disorders and voice therapist Jamy Claire Archer, one of 10 Gamecocks Carolinian magazine spoke to about how the pandemic has changed the way we work.

head and shoulders photo of Patricia Fabel

Garnet Apple Teaching Award: Patricia Fabel

August 05, 2021, Craig Brandhorst

For associate professor of pharmacy Patricia Fabel, classroom education is a team effort, with students contributing their own experiences to the discussion. “Whether we're talking about immunizations, medications, over-the-counter products or things that they've interacted with and their family has interacted with, they bring different perspectives to the table,” she says.

shawnese cleveland class of 2021

Class of 2021: Shawnese Cleveland

April 20, 2021, Craig Brandhorst

First-generation college student Shawnese Cleveland started her academic career as a political science major, intent on going to law school one day and perhaps working in government. After watching the event staff do their thing during a women’s basketball game at Colonial Life Arena, the Georgia native changed her mind and changed her major. Now, following back-to-back campus internships, the sport and entertainment management major is kicking off her career at a Las Vegas resort.

empty dining room with the alps in the background

COVID-19 impact: Changes in tourism

March 18, 2021, Craig Brandhorst

A year into the COVID-19 pandemic, we asked members of the university community to share their expertise about how the coronavirus has affected all facets of life and offer insights on ways to move forward. Simon Hudson, a professor of tourism in the College of Hospitality, Retail and Sport Management, speaks about COVID-19’s economic impact on the tourism industry.

artist rendering of mohammed dajani standing beside a railroad switching station

Dajani's cave

February 09, 2021, Craig Brandhorst

In 2014, Mohammed Dajani, longtime professor at Jerusalem’s al-Quds University, took 27 Palestinian college students to Auschwitz, the Nazi concentration near Krakow, Poland. He wanted them to confront the Holocaust, which he believes is downplayed in Palestinian schools, and to consider the complicated history of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict from multiple perspectives. The backlash would cost him his job and endanger his life. It would also embolden his commitment to reconciliation.

Tim Smith outside Papa Jazz

UofSC alums help keep 5 Points alive

December 14, 2020, Craig Brandhorst

If you think Five Points is only a college bar district, think again. The village down the hill has drawn South Carolina students for more than a century, and not simply to celebrate. And for many who settle in the Capital City after graduation, Five Points remains an integral part of their lives, including Tim Smith, who turned his passion for music into a 40-year career buying and selling it.

Don McCallister inside Loose Lucy's

UofSC alums help keep 5 Points alive

December 10, 2020, Craig Brandhorst

If you think Five Points is only a college bar district, think again. The village down the hill has drawn South Carolina students for more than a century, and not simply to celebrate. And for many who settle in the Capital City after graduation, Five Points remains an integral part of their lives, including Don McCallister, whose business Loose Lucy's supports his creative outlets.

Opie patterson inside Goat's

UofSC alums help keep 5 Points alive

December 08, 2020, Craig Brandhorst

If you think Five Points is only a college bar district, think again. The village down the hill has drawn South Carolina students for more than a century, and not simply to celebrate. And for many who settle in the Capital City after college, Five Points remains an integral part of their lives, including Opie Patterson, who reopened one of the district's most iconic nightspots five years ago.

amy beth franks sits in the gourmet shop

UofSC alums help keep 5 Points alive

December 03, 2020, Craig Brandhorst

If you think Five Points is only a college bar district, think again. The village down the hill has drawn South Carolina students for more than a century, and not simply to celebrate. And for many who settle in the Capital City after graduation, Five Points remains an integral part of their lives, including Amy Beth Franks, who worked for the Five Points Association and now owns one of the district's oldest businesses.

five points fountain

UofSC alums help keep 5 Points alive

December 01, 2020, Craig Brandhorst

If you think Five Points is only a college bar district, think again. The village down the hill has drawn South Carolina students for more than a century, and not simply to celebrate. And for many who settle in the Capital City after graduation, Five Points remains an integral part of their lives, including Richard Burts, who has helped re-imagine many of the district's spaces.

man wearing a face covering walks in Paris with the Eiffel Tower in the background

Covid-19: Tourism update

July 16, 2020, Craig Brandhorst

As the coronavirus threatens health and upends daily life throughout the world, UofSC Today is turning to our faculty to help us make sense of it all. While no one can predict exactly what will happen in the coming months, our faculty can help us ask the right questions and put important context around emerging events. Simon Hudson, a professor of tourism in the College of Hospitality, Retail and Sport Management and author of the new book "COVID-19 and Travel: Impacts, Responses and Outcomes," keeps us up-to date on the pandemic’s travel sector impact.

Elizabeth Thompson leads a group exercise class

Class of 2020: Elizabeth Thompson

May 12, 2020, Craig Brandhorst

Elizabeth Thompson wanted to be at the head of the class — and she made sure she got there. No, we’re not talking about the computer engineering major’s classroom success, which landed her a job in her field straight out of college. We’re talking about Thompson’s other driving passion: group fitness instruction.

archival image of student protests in May 1970

50 years of May

April 27, 2020, Craig Brandhorst

A half century ago, against the backdrop of the Vietnam War and seismic shifts in American culture, the campus of the University of South Carolina became a battleground — between students and the administration, between a young generation and the establishment, between radically different worldviews. But the dramatic events of that spring, which came to be known as The Months of May, weren’t strictly destructive. The lessons of that era also changed lives and changed the university itself.