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UofSC civil rights center to reveal historical marker for landmark protest

On Tuesday, March 2, the Center for Civil Rights History and Research at the University of South Carolina will commemorate the courage of hundreds of students who marched on the South Carolina State House 60 years ago, leading to landmark changes in the Civil Rights Movement. 

Dance professors awarded NEA grant for original work "Migratuse Ataraxia"

Two theatre professors are creating a unique performance to tell the story of Black liberation and migration through dance at several historic sites in Columbia, South Carolina.

Noted geoscientist to headline 'Climates' Theme Semester

The Climates Theme Semester will include a keynote lecture by Richard Alley, a scientist known for his ability to teach about climate change in ways that span partisan divides. He says his talk for Theme Semester will focus on the opportunities that can be realized in dealing with climate issues.

Marine science students realize dream career on research cruise

Two University of South Carolina undergraduate students spent their winter break diving deep into their dream career.

Claudia Benitez Nelson chosen for oceanography mentoring award

The Oceanography Society selected Claudia Benitez Nelson, a South Carolina marine science professor and associate dean, for its first Mentoring Award.

Online workshops will help foster constructive talks about race

The Ed Talks on Race workshops will address topics at the forefront of race relations in the U.S. and help attendees to develop skills and perspectives that support constructive conversations about race and racism.

Dean Joel H. Samuels' welcome message to students

A message from the interim dean.

Mentoring changes lives, even online

A UofSC criminology course helps students become mentors to local teens. In 2020, they saw how even a shift to online mentoring could change lives, for the college students as well as the high schoolers.

Political science, Spanish graduate sees signs of success in international business

2020 was a challenging time to launch an international business. But John Bailey '05 says there is opportunity, too. His signage company took on the creation of a specialized sign for Krispy Kreme in New York City.

Five Arts & Sciences students receive Gilman scholarships for international study

Five students whose majors or minors are in the College of Arts and Sciences were named Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholars. They will use the Gilman scholarships to study abroad in Japan, Spain and the UK.

Forbes recognizes UofSC graduate for cleaner fracking tech

Geophysics alumnus Paris Smalls (2016) is developing technology that could help companies cut costs and pollution from the fracking process. Just four years since he graduated from UofSC, the U.S. government has awarded his company more than $1 million in research grants and Forbes Magazine named him one of the top 30 Under 30 in Energy.

Remembering Don Fowler

Don Fowler, a longtime University of South Carolina professor and mainstay in South Carolina politics, died Tuesday, December 15. He was 85.

Mentoring the Youth

Devin Lemon started college out of state, but he felt something was missing. When he came home to South Carolina, he found his sense of belonging in the University of South Carolina criminal justice program.

Graduation fulfills a promise

When Dorcas Larry transferred twice and took time off from college to travel the world, some people told her it would be too difficult to come back and finish. But she was determined to complete her degree.

Creative writing students inspire creativity and community

A creative writing class has found ways to serve the community, even with social distance requirements in place.

Cicely was young, Black and enslaved – her death during an epidemic in 1714 has lessons that resonate in today’s pandemic

As COVID-19 affects frontline workers and communities of color far more than other demographic groups, and protesters agitate for racial justice, American society is wrestling with its racial memory and judging which monuments and memorials deserve a place. In The Conversation, history professor Nicole S. Maskiell looks back at how a few marginalized and oppressed people who served on the front lines of prior epidemics have been treated and remembered.

Cicely was young, Black and enslaved – her death during an epidemic in 1714 has lessons that resonate in today’s pandemic

As COVID-19 affects frontline workers and communities of color far more than other demographic groups, and protesters agitate for racial justice, American society is wrestling with its racial memory and judging which monuments and memorials deserve a place. In The Conversation, history professor Nicole S. Maskiell looks back at how a few marginalized and oppressed people who served on the front lines of prior epidemics have been treated and remembered.

Connect Lab shifts online to promote fitness

Student researchers got creative to make new ways to promote physical fitness in after school programs in South Carolina.

Garnet Apple winner: Hayden Smith

Take a criminal justice course with Hayden Smith, and at some point in the semester, you’ll probably find yourself behind bars, inside a 6-by-9-foot cell. You might also hear voices and see hallucinations, just like inmates diagnosed with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder.

Mungo award winner: Mary Robinson

As a professor in the School of Visual Art and Design, Mary Robinson believes in creating a sense of community – both in the classroom and beyond.

3 professors earn AAAS honor for scientific accomplishments

Three faculty members in the University of South Carolina College of Arts and Sciences have been elected fellows in the American Association for the Advancement of Science. The recognition is an honor bestowed by a scientist’s peers to recognize distinguished contributions to science.

Garnet Apple winner: Micky Myrick

Two things you should know about chemistry professor Micky Myrick: He doesn’t shy away from a challenging task even if there’s little reward in it, and once he has committed to something, he’s in it for the long haul.

The class assignment that morphed into legislation

A speech that Gweneth Gough wrote for an English class eventually influenced a new law that gives middle school students more access to mental health education.

Mungo award winner: Anna Swartwood House

Knowledge is constructed, not passively received. That, in a nutshell, is Anna Swartwood House’s teaching philosophy, the underpinning of everything she does in the classroom. But the University of South Carolina assistant professor of art history isn’t the sole architect of her students’ education; everyone shares in the heavy lifting.

U.S. Navy veteran embarks on a new mission to earn doctorate

Before Marco Hernandez was incubating proteins in a laboratory, he was flinging fighter jets from aircraft carriers. The veteran’s job in the U.S. Navy was to maintain and operate the steam catapults that launch jets and the cable systems that catch them as they land.

 

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