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National Resource Center for The First-Year Experience and Students in Transition

Publication Details

The Influence of Perceived Parental Expectations and Pressures on Women's Academic Achievement During the First Year of College


Author(s): Furry, A. N., & Sy, S. R.

Citation: Furry, A. N., & Sy, S. R. (2015). The Influence of Perceived Parental Expectations and Pressures on Women's Academic Achievement During the First Year of College. Journal of The First-Year Experience & Students in Transition, 27(1), 49-67.

 

Abstract

Previous research has examined the relationship between parental expectations and student academic performance. However, less attention has been given to the role of different parental pressures in students' achievement during their first semester of college. The purpose of this study is to examine the influence of perceived parental expectations and pressures on female college students' academic performance. A sample of 620 female students from two large, public universities completed an online survey measuring perceived parental expectations and various types of pressure. Results showed a negative relationship between levels of perceived parental expectations and pressures and fall semester grade point averages (GPA). However, the significance of these relationships varied by ethnic group. Results from this study have important implications for parents and educators. Resources from educators and support from parents should be provided to students to promote academic success, especially among female college students.

 

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