Remembering Dean Shoquist

 

There was a lot to like about Joe Shoquist. He was a quiet man, yet passionate. He cared about newspapers and reporting. He knew that First Amendment freedoms matter in our society. I especially liked that he came to be dean of what was then the College of Journalism and Mass Communications after a successful career as a working journalist and editor. That gave me some comfort that, perhaps, I had also taken a reasonable course.

 

Joe ShoquistOccasionally, before his health faltered, Joe would drop by the dean’s office to ask how things were going and how the school was doing. He didn’t want to impose. He never did.

 

There was a bit of the Wild West in this mild-mannered reporter. His journalistic career led him through Idaho and Montana before reaching the Milwaukee Journal. Though he settled in South Carolina, Joe divided his time between Columbia and Jackson, Wyoming. If you’ve been to Jackson Hole and seen the Tetons, you know Joe had an appreciation for earth’s majesty.

 

I’ll leave it to Henry Price and Lester Duhe to tell the stories of hunting with Joe.

 

They are good stories. Journalists always have good stories to tell and a few that could be told about them.

 

Joe died February 27, at age 84. He could have told those stories. But he was a quiet man who, at least in my acquaintance, would rather talk about the profession we shared.

"He didn't thrive on any sort of spotlight at all," Joe’s daughter Sally told the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel. "There were parts of him that were quiet and gentle, and others that were very opinionated." You’d only need to ask him about journalism ethics or freedom of the press to get that opinion.

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This is the second time in only a few months that I have had to write about the death of one of our previous deans. In November, Al Scroggins passed away. Together Al and Joe devoted a quarter century to the journalism school, our scholastic journalism program and the university.

 

Bierbauer signature

 

A memorial service for Dean Shoquist will be held on Saturday, March 6, at 2 p.m. in Rutledge Chapel on the campus of the University of South Carolina.

 

 

Alumni News

 

 

IntercomWe Need Your Feedback on InterCom!

 

The College of Mass Communications and Information Studies needs your suggestions! Our students are working hard to produce the next issue of InterCom, our alumni magazine. We are looking for feedback from alumni to help us continue to improve the magazine. Please take a few minutes to complete our readership survey as we move forward in producing our spring issue. Click on this link. Take Survey>

 

Thank you in advance for your help!

 

 

 

May Carolina Alumni Weekend

 

May Carolina LogoMay Carolina Alumni Weekend is a new tradition at the University of South Carolina. Springtime affords alumni and friends an opportunity to revisit the gorgeous and growing campus when the magnolias are blossoming and the morning dew canvases the greenery of the Horseshoe.

 

Meet former classmates and bring your family back to Columbia for a reunion weekend at Carolina. Last year, our college hosted a tour of Newsplex and a session on our literacy initiative, Cocky’s Reading Express.

 

Join us for another excellent weekend of exhibits, lectures, tours and receptions on May 14 and 15, 2010. If you’re a member of the class of 1960, make plans to return to campus this May for your Golden Reunion!

 

Our college will host an event Friday, May 14. Stay tuned to your e-mail for more details.

 

College News

 

Cocky’s Reading Express Announces Gift from
BP America, Inc.BP LOGO

 

Cocky’s Reading Express™ (CRE) received a gift for $25,000 from BP America in December. This gift will underwrite statewide expansion of CRE to the Midlands, Upstate and Lowcountry.  Visits to these areas will be implemented this fall.

 

 

 

Scholastic Journalism Director Receives National Award

 

Karen FlowersKaren Flowers, director of the South Carolina Scholastic Press Association (SCSPA) and of the Southern Interscholastic Press Association (SIPA), will receive the James F. Paschal Award of the Columbia Scholastic Press Advisors Association (CSPAA) for 2010.

 

This honor is given for meritorious service to a state scholastic press association by one of its officials.

 

The award originated in 1987 and is named for Professor James F. Paschal of the University of Oklahoma in honor of his service to both CSPAA and to the Oklahoma Interscholastic Press Association.

 

 

 

Doritos To Receive 2010 Cocky Award for Best Super Bowl Commercial

 

The Doritos Samurai commercial received the highest ratings from students in Professor Bonnie Drewniany’s Honors College Super Bowl Advertising class.

 

Each year, Professor Drewniany’s class gathers to watch the game and rate each national ad in three categories: persuasion, brand identity and likability. Alumni and friends also voted online, selecting the Google Lovebirds as their top-rated ad.

 

Doritos’ creative director will be invited to campus this fall to receive the award and share the process of making the commercial with the students.

 

 

Upcoming Events

 

Carolina Day at the Statehouse - Wednesday, March 24

 

Every year, hundreds of alumni take to the steps of the Statehouse to advocate for the Palmetto State's universities. Wear your garnet and black and "Step Up" in support of Carolina.

 

Don't miss out on this opportunity to become an effective advocate for USC and meet your legislators at the Statehouse. You can make a difference on Carolina Day at the Statehouse, March 24, 2010!

 

Those wishing to participate should register by March 17. A $15 donation is required to defray the cost of lunch.

Faculty Spotlight

 

Faculty Spotlight on Paul Solomon

 

By Emily Ko, SJMC Student

 

Information research might appear as an intimidating topic, but for Dr. Paul Solomon of the School of Library and Information Science, it is his passion. He has spent his career investigating how people best search for information by conducting studies and teaching students on the undergraduate, graduate, and doctoral levels.

 

Paul SolomonDr. Solomon knows academia well. He earned his bachelor’s degree at Penn State University, followed by an MBA at the University of Washington. He earned both an MLS and a Ph.D. at the University of Maryland. At UNC Chapel Hill, he served as professor, associate dean, interim dean, and senior associate dean of the School of Library and Information Science. He joined the University of South Carolina faculty in 2008.

 

Research and teaching are both important to Dr. Solomon. He combines both by sharing his research with his students. He believes in individuality in learning, so his students choose their own project topics to best apply their knowledge.

 

”I want them to be able to use what they’re learning for their own purposes. A lot of classes focus on learning facts. What I try to do is give students an opportunity to use what they’re learning in a basic level of understanding,” he said.

 

He conducted his favorite study in 1990 when he observed how school children search for and process information. He found that those who are given comparisons and variety learn better. The study was so influential that he applies his findings to his current work.

 

The main finding was that groups of people have different vocabularies, which makes computer research unfruitful for those unaware of common search terms.

 

“The problem with children using technology is that the terminology is made by adults, so kids have problems. They need simple, concrete terms,” he said. “We’re trying to overcome the problem of language.”

 

If Dr. Solomon isn’t having fun with his work, it’s not a worthwhile endeavor. In his mind, every job or project has something enjoyable to offer. He truly hopes to help people.

 

“So often, people are engaged in the information research process. In my classes and research I move people from general awareness to more specific learning as they interact with what they retrieve,” he said.

 

Donor Spotlight

 

Donor Spotlight on the Post and Courier Foundation

 

By Chrissy Robertson, SJMC Student

 

Jasiri Whipper Scholarship

 

The Post and Courier Foundation has long promoted journalism education in South Carolina, awarding merit-based scholarships to Charleston-area minority students in the School of Journalism and Mass Communications every year since 1991. The Post and Courier-Jasiri Whipper Journalism Scholarship not only provides financial assistance to its recipients, but also gives them internship and employment opportunities at The Post and Courier.

 

While this scholarship always has been a priority for the Post and Courier Foundation, it now has deeper significance. One of The Post and Courier’s own reporters had a strong desire to serve his community, and he exemplified the attributes of successful scholarship recipients. Jasiri Whipper, who died at age 24 in December 2008, was a role model and positive influence in the Charleston community where he volunteered with Beaux Affair, an organization that helps young black men succeed. The foundation scholarship was renamed The Post and Courier-Jasiri Whipper Journalism Scholarship to honor Whipper’s memory and his work in the community.

 

The $6,000-a-year, renewable scholarship was created to encourage underserved South Carolina students to pursue education and careers in newspaper journalism. In addition to the scholarship funding, recipients may be offered paid summer internships at The Post and Courier. After graduation from USC, they are expected to accept a salaried position in The Post and Courier’s newsroom for at least one year, if such a job is available.

 

Second-year SJMC student Jade McDuffie has received the Whipper Scholarship and said she has an edge over her classmates because of the internship opportunity. “I get to work with talented writers and editors in the newspaper industry every summer. I get to experience journalism firsthand and learn from the mistakes I make. This scholarship has allowed me to excel not only as a print journalism major, but also as a journalist."

 

“We deeply appreciate the Post and Courier Foundation’s ongoing support of our students. The great thing about this scholarship is that, for the first time, the recipients do not have to be print journalism majors. Now multimedia journalists will also get the chance to receive this incredible scholarship,” said Beverly Dominick, SJMC Career Services director.

 

The Whipper Scholarships are the only scholarships the Post and Courier Foundation funds at this time. Established in 1952, the Post and Courier Foundation is a private foundation that provides grants to a variety of nonprofit organizations in the greater Charleston community in six program areas: Conservation/Preservation, Education, Health/Welfare, Civic and Cultural/Arts.


UPCOMING EVENTS

 

Carolina Day at the Statehouse
Wednesday, March 24

Every year, hundreds of alumni take to the steps of the Statehouse to advocate for the Palmetto State's universities. Wear your garnet and black and "Step Up" in support of Carolina. Don't miss out on this opportunity to become an effective advocate for USC and meet your legislators at the Statehouse. You can make a difference on Carolina Day at the Statehouse, March 24, 2010! Those wishing to participate should register by March 17. A $15 donation is required to defray the cost of lunch. For more information and to register:

Register>


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