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Department of English Language and Literature

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Undergraduate Course Descriptions - Summer 2019

3 Week Summer Sessions

ENGL 101.001   Critical Reading and Composition   Satisfies CMW   MTWR 8:30-12:00   DINGS
Instruction and intensive practice in researching, analyzing, and composing written arguments about academic and public issues.

ENGL 102.002   Rhetoric and Composition   Satisfies CMW   MTWR 12:20-3:50   STERN
Instruction and intensive practice in researching, analyzing, and composing written arguments about academic and public issues.

ENGL 102.J10   Rhetoric and Composition   Satisfies CMW   WEB   CROCKER
Instruction and intensive practice in researching, analyzing, and composing written arguments about academic and public issues.

ENGL 102.J11   Rhetoric and Composition   Satisfies CMW   WEB   BROCK
Instruction and intensive practice in researching, analyzing, and composing written arguments about academic and public issues.

ENGL 360.001   Creative Writing   MTWR 12:20-3:50   BARILLA
This course will explore strategies for producing compelling creative work in different genres. At the beginning of the course, we will work with elements of short fiction, and move in more experimental directions as the course proceeds. The course will function primarily as a workshop, in which students will share work in progress with other members of the class. The course will also involve reading and discussing published models, as well as numerous writing exercises. Students will produce a portfolio of original creative work, which they will turn in at the end of the course for a final grade.

ENGL 431A.001   Children’s Literature   MTWR 8:30-12:00   JOHNSON-FEELINGS
This course introduces students to the field of contemporary children’s literature, encompassing picture books as well as short novels written for audiences of young people. Topics of exploration include (but are not limited to) the history of children’s literature, the world of children’s book prizing, the legacy of Dr. Seuss, the disturbing image in children’s books, and literary/artistic excellence in children’s literature. In some ways, this is an American Studies course; students will consider ways in which children’s literature infuses our culture—“There’s no place like home.” Students will leave the course with an understanding of central issues and controversies in the industry of children’s book publishing and the literary criticism of children’s books. Most importantly, students will explore the relationship between children’s literature and the idea of social justice.

ENGL 102.003   Rhetoric and Composition   Satisfies CMW   MTWR 8:30-12:00   JARRELLS
Instruction and intensive practice in researching, analyzing, and composing written arguments about academic and public issues.

ENGL 102.004   Rhetoric and Composition   Satisfies CMW   MTWR 12:20-3:50   BAJO
Students learn how to create truly persuasive written arguments based on research and rhetorical strategies.  Students develop various skills required for good argument writing and bring those skills together for the final course project, a researched argument paper.

ENGL 102.J12   Rhetoric and Composition   Satisfies CMW   WEB   SCHWEBEL
Instruction and intensive practice in researching, analyzing, and composing written arguments about academic and public issues.

ENGL 287.001   American Literature   Satisfies AIU   MTWR 12:20-3:50  WOERTENDYKE
An introduction to American literary history, emphasizing the analysis of literary texts, the development of literary traditions over time, the emergence of new genres and forms, and the writing of successful essays about literature. Designed for English majors.

ENGL 437.001   Women Writers   MTWR 12:20-3:50   GULICK
ENGL 437 will focus primarily on contemporary women writers who hail from the Global South—that is, parts of the world that exist on the margins of the world’s political and economic centers of power. We will explore a wide range of literary forms and styles that women writers deploy and have often, indeed, invented. We will encounter texts that illuminate a diversity of perspectives and life experiences, as well as multiple definitions of, and relationships to, the concept of “feminism.” We will pay special attention to how non-western writers tackle themes of migration, hybridity, and globalization in their work. Throughout, we will adopt an intersectional approach to issues of gender, class, race, and sexuality—that is, we will recognize that none of these identity categories exist in a vacuum, and are thus best analyzed together. Authors will likely include Audre Lorde, Jamaica Kincaid, Tsitsi Dangarembga, Jhumpa Lahiri, Marjane Satrapi, and Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie. 

You do not need to be an English or Women’s and Gender Studies major in order to take this course.  But you should plan to read voraciously, write carefully, engage with textual material that may be personally as well as intellectually challenging, and approach discussions with inquisitiveness, candor, and generosity.

ENGL 102.005   Rhetoric and Composition   Satisfies CMW   MTWR 8:30-12:00   RULE
This section of 102 focuses on rhetorical researching, writing, analysis, and information literacies through active and collaborative writer's workshop and portfolio methods. 

ENGL 102.J13   Rhetoric and Composition   Satisfies CMW   WEB   LEE
Instruction and intensive practice in researching, analyzing, and composing written arguments about academic and public issues.

ENGL 385.001   Modernism   MTWR 8:30-12:00   GLAVEY
This course will provide a survey of the twentieth-century literature that scholars have retrospectively labeled modernist. Our primary goal will be to understand the specific features of the literature we will be studying: how the texts are put together as works of art, what they attempt to achieve, how they may or may not challenge twenty-first century readers. My own interest is in what we might learn about modernity’s “structures of feeling” (What it feels like to be modern) and the various ways in which the aesthetic has enabled people to engage creatively with these structures, especially as they relate to the experience of race, gender, and sexuality. In thinking through what literature tells us about such questions, we will consider the artistic, technological, epistemological, psychological, and sociological facets of modernity as mediated by the particular formal and thematic choices of our authors.

ENGL 428B.001   African-American Lit II: 1903-PRESENT   MTWR 8:30-12:00   TRAFTON
Representative works of African-American writers from 1903 to the present. For additional information, contact the instructor.


Challenge the conventional. Create the exceptional. No Limits.

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