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Events

Readings, lectures, and other events sponsored by the English Department and our partners, listed below, are typically free and open to the public.

When: 6 p.m., Thursday, November 15, 2018
Where: Program Room in the Ernest F. Hollings Special Collections Library

Graphic novelist and cartoonist Gene Luen Yang began creating comics and graphic novels more than 15 years ago. In 2006, his acclaimed graphic novel American Born Chinese won several awards, including an Eisner Award for Best Graphic Album, one of the highest honors in the industry. It was the first graphic novel to be nominated for a National Book Award and the first to win the American Library Association’s Printz Award, which recognizes excellence in young adult literature. In 2013, Boxers & Saints, his two-volume graphic novel about the Boxer Rebellion, was nominated for a National Book Award and won the L.A. Times’ Book Prize.

His other work includes The Shadow Hero; The Eternal Smile, another Eisner award winner, and the continuation of the Nickelodeon cartoon Avatar: The Last Airbender. Secret Coders, a graphic novel series for computer nerds ages 8 - 12, combines logic puzzles and basic coding instructions.

In 2016, Yang was named a MacArthur Fellow, and the U.S. Library of Congress named him to a two-year term as Ambassador for Young People’s Literature. He teaches creative writing through Hamline University’s MFA program in Writing for Children and Young Adults.

When: 6 p.m., Thursday, November 8, 2018
Where: Program Room in the Ernest F. Hollings Special Collections Library

Egan became a contributor to the international conversation about grief and dying after her book, On Living, was published in 2016. A hospice chaplain, Egan is in a unique position to share the life lessons she learns from those preparing to die. She has been featured on PBS and CNN, and her essays have appeared in Parents, American Baby, Reader’s Digest and CNN.com.

Egan grew up in Long Island, New York, and received her B.A. from Washington and Lee University and a Master of Divinity from Harvard University Divinity School. While at Harvard she worked as a nursing-home ombudsman, a chaplain intern at the Dana Farber Cancer Institute, and a research assistant at Harvard’s Center for the Study of World Religions.

Egan now lives in Columbia, South Carolina.

When: 6 p.m., Thursday, November 1, 2018
Where: Program Room in the Ernest F. Hollings Special Collections Library

Born in Istanbul to Iranian parents, Solmaz Sharif writes about the ongoing costs of terrorism and war, the aftermath of warfare, and using speech to address the unspeakable. Her work is always inventive in its use of form. Her first poetry collection, LOOK, published by Graywolf Press in 2016, was a finalist for the 2016 National Book Award. She received a 2016 Lannan Literary Fellowship and the Holmes National Poetry Prize from Princeton University.

Sharif’s work has appeared in The New Republic, Poetry, The Kenyon Review, Granta and others. Her work has been recognized with a “Discovery”/Boston Review Poetry Prize, the Rona Jaffe Foundation Writers’ Award, and an NEA fellowship.

Sharif holds degrees from the University of California Berkeley, where she studied and taught with June Jordan’s Poetry for the People, and New York University. She is the former managing director of the Asian American Writers’ workshop and a former Stegner Fellow. She is currently a lecturer at Stanford University.

APRIL 18
-Open Book 2018:   JUAN FELIPE HERRERA

When: 6-7 p.m., Wednesday, April 18, 2018
Where: Capstone Campus Room

Juan Felipe Herrera (born December 27, 1948) Fowler, California is a poet, performer, writer, cartoonist, teacher, and activist. Herrera was the United States Poet Laureate from 2015 to 2017.

Herrera's experiences as the child of migrant farmers have strongly shaped his work a lot, such as the children's book Calling the Doves, which won the Ezra Jack Keats Book Award in 1997. Community and art have always been part of what has driven Herrera, beginning in the mid-seventies, when he was director of the Centro Cultural de la Raza, an occupied water tank in Balboa Park that had been converted into an arts space for the community.

All talks and author appearances run 6-7 p.m., including time for questions, in the Campus Room of the Capstone Building. Author appearances are followed by refreshments and book signing. Seating is first come, first served. All events are free and open to all, including students, faculty, staff, and the wider community.

APRIL 16
-Open Book 2018:   MICHAEL DOWDY

When: 6 p.m., Monday, April 16, 2018
Where: Capstone Campus Room

Michael Dowdy talks on Notes on the Assemblage.

All talks and author appearances run 6-7 p.m., including time for questions, in the Campus Room of the Capstone Building. Author appearances are followed by refreshments and book signing. Seating is first come, first served. All events are free and open to all, including students, faculty, staff, and the wider community.

April 13
-INK! Conference

When:  April 13, 2018, Time TBA
Where: Room TBA

So, INK! is the Undergraduate English Association. The all-day conference is an opportunity for undergraduate students to present scholarly or creative work to an audience of peers and professors. For students wishing to submit for the conference, the link is https://garnetgate.sa.sc.edu/submitter/form/start/159424

APRIL 11
-Open Book 2018:   ANTHONY MARRA

When: 6-7 p.m., Wednesday, April 11, 2018
Where: Capstone Campus Room

Anthony Marra attended high school at the Landon School, and graduated from the University of Southern California with a BA, and the Iowa Writers' Workshop at the University of Iowa with an MFA. In 2009, he attended the University of Iowa Writers' Workshop. He was a 2011–2013 Stegner Fellow at Stanford University. Currently, he teaches at Stanford University as the Jones Lecturer in Fiction. He has lived and studied in Eastern Europe, and now resides in Oakland, CA. He has contributed pieces to The Atlantic, Narrative Magazine, and MAKE Magazine. His debut novel, A Constellation of Vital Phenomena, was published in May 2013 by Hogarth.

All talks and author appearances run 6-7 p.m., including time for questions, in the Campus Room of the Capstone Building. Author appearances are followed by refreshments and book signing. Seating is first come, first served. All events are free and open to all, including students, faculty, staff, and the wider community.

APRIL 4
-Talk by Paul Fry

When: Wednesday, April 4, 2018
Where:
Petigru 111

Talk title: “The New Metacriticisms and the Fate of Interpretation.”
Paul Fry , William Lampson Professor of English at Yale University

APRIL 4
-Open Book 2018:   CRISTINA GARCIA

When: 6-7 p.m., Wednesday, April 4, 2018
Where: Capstone Campus Room

Cristina García (born July 4, 1958) is a Cuban-born American journalist and novelist. After working for Time Magazine as a researcher, reporter, and Miami bureau chief, she turned to writing fiction. Her first novel, Dreaming in Cuban (1992), received critical acclaim and was a finalist for the National Book Award. She has since published her novels The Agüero Sisters (1997) and Monkey Hunting (2003), and has edited books of Cuban and other Latin American literature. Her fourth novel, A Handbook to Luck, was released in hardcover in 2007 and came out in paperback in April 2008.

All talks and author appearances run 6-7 p.m., including time for questions, in the Campus Room of the Capstone Building. Author appearances are followed by refreshments and book signing. Seating is first come, first served. All events are free and open to all, including students, faculty, staff, and the wider community.

APRIL 2
-Open Book:   Talk on King of Cuba

When: 6 p.m., Monday, April 2, 2018
Where: Capstone Campus Room

Joshua Jelly-Shapiro will discuss the King of Cuba by Cristina Garcia. The event is free and open to the public. 

MARCH 28
-Open Book 2018:   COLSON WHITEHEAD

When: 6-7 p.m., Wednesday, March 28, 2018
Where: Capstone Campus Room

Colson Whitehead (born November 6, 1969) is an American novelist. He is the author of six novels, including his debut work, the 1999 novel The Intuitionist, and The Underground Railroad (2016), for which he won the 2016 National Book Award for Fiction and the 2017 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction. He has also published two books of non-fiction. In 2002, he received a MacArthur Fellowship ("Genius Grant").

All talks and author appearances run 6-7 p.m., including time for questions, in the Campus Room of the Capstone Building. Author appearances are followed by refreshments and book signing. Seating is first come, first served. All events are free and open to all, including students, faculty, staff, and the wider community.

 

MARCH 26
-Open Book:   Talk on The Underground Railroad

When: 6 p.m., Monday, March 26, 2018
Where: Capstone Campus Room

Elise Blackwell will discuss The Underground Railroad by Colson Whitehead as the Open Book Series opens. The event is free and open to the public. 

MARCH 22
-Talk by Raphael Dalleo

When: Thursday, March 22, 2018
Where:
Room/Times TBA

Dalleo is Associate Professor of English at Bucknell University and author (most recently) of American Imperialism’s Undead: The Occupation of Haiti and the Rise of Caribbean Anticolonialism. Sponsored by the Walker Institute’s Caribbean Studies Working Group.

MARCH 5-7
-Maxy Visiting Fellow:   LESLEY NINEKE ARIMAH

When: TBA
Where: Room TBA

Arimah is a writer of rapidly growing prominence, whose 2017 short story collection "What it Means When a Man Falls From the Sky" is seemingly on everyone's "Best Of" list and which just won a Kirkus Prize.