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Department of Psychology

Faculty and Staff Directory

Jessica Bradshaw

Title: Assistant Professor
Department: Psychology
College of Arts and Sciences
Email: jbradshaw@sc.edu
Phone: 803-777-4137
Office: Barnwell College Rm 460
Jessica Bradshaw

* Dr. Bradshaw is accepting graduate students for the Clinical Community Program*

Background

Dr. Bradshaw received her PhD in Clinical, Counseling, and School Psychology from the University of California, Santa Barbara after which time she completed her postdoctoral work at the Marcus Autism Center, Emory University School of Medicine. She has been involved in autism research since her undergraduate work in Cognitive Science at the University of California, San Diego and her post-baccalaureate work at the Yale Child Study Center.

Research

My research focuses on early identification and intervention of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in the first years of life. Specifically, I am interested in: 1) quantifying the emergence of, and interrelations between, social behavior, visual attention, and motor skills in neonates, infants, and toddlers, 2) identifying aberrant neurodevelopmental pathways that lead to the emergence of autism spectrum disorder (ASD), and 3) translating these basic findings to early detection and intervention strategies for ASD.

Early Identification

I use behavioral, eye tracking, and physiological methods to map early neurobehavioral development and identify pivotal transitions that occur between birth and 12 months of age, with a particular interest in birth through 5 months. In the context of longitudinal research designs with infants at risk for ASD, I aim to understand how disruption during these early developmental periods may have cascading consequences on the development of social communication.

Early Intervention

A second line of my research focuses on naturalistic developmental behavioral interventions (NDBIs) for infants and toddlers with or at risk for ASD. I am interested in using eye tracking to identify both parent and child predictors of treatment response and using these predictors to better individualize treatment. I am also interested in exploring how we can use NDBI methods to enhance social attention and support motor development in the first months of life and how these efforts may facilitate the emergence of social communication for infants at risk for ASD.

Representative Publications

Bradshaw, J., Klaiman, C., Gillespie, S., Brane, N., Lewis, M., Saulnier, C. (2018). Walking Ability is Associated with Social-Communication Skills in Infants at High Risk for Autism Spectrum Disorder. Infancy. doi: 10.1111/infa.12242

Bradshaw, J., Bearss, K., McCracken, C., Smith, T., Johnson, C., Lecavalier, L., Swiezy, N., Scahill, L. (2017). Parent Education for Young Children with Autism and Disruptive Behavior: Response to Active Control Treatment. Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology. doi: 10.1080/15374416.2017.1381913.

Bradshaw, J. Koegel, L., Koegel, R. (2017). Improving Functional Language and Social Motivation with a Parent-Mediated Intervention for Toddlers with Symptoms of Autism Spectrum Disorder. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 47(8), 2443-2458. doi: 10.1007/s10803-017-3155-8.

Bradshaw, J., Steiner, A. M., Gengoux, G., & Koegel, L. K. (2015). Feasibility and Effectiveness of Very Early Intervention for Infants At-Risk for Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Systematic Review. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, doi: 10.1007/s10803-014-2235-2.

Koegel, L., Singh, A., Koegel, R., Hollingsworth, J., & Bradshaw, J. (2014). Assessing and Improving Early Social Engagement in Infants. Journal of Positive Behavior Intervention, 16(2), 69-80.

Bradshaw, J., Shic, F., & Chawarska, K. (2011). Brief Report: Face-Specific Recognition Deficits in Young Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disabilities, 41(10), 1429-1435 doi: 10.1007/s10803-010-1150-4.


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