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Department of English Language and Literature

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Undergraduate Course Descriptions - Spring 2019

Awesome, Cool Classes You Won’t See Every Semester

ENGL 430.001  -  TOPICS IN AFRICAN AMERICAN LITERATURE: Slavery, Literature, and Popular Culture MW 9:40-10:55 WHITTED

How do literature and popular culture grapple with the historical realities of slavery? How do these representations shape the way we remember the past and relate to one another in the present? In this course, we 7 will examine how the experiences of enslaved black Americans are adapted through novels, comics, film, art, and new media. Our goal is to raise questions not just about historical accuracy, but about ethics and aesthetic choices, creative freedom, taste, and cultural appropriation. Along with studying select slave narratives, we will discuss the depiction of slavery in science fiction by Octavia Butler, a graphic novel by Kyle Baker, a romance novel by Beverly Jenkins, the satire of Charles Johnson’s novel, Middle Passage, and in screenings of films and TV series such as Roots, 12 Years a Slave, and Underground. We will also consider sketch comedy such as the web series “Ask a Slave” and video games like “Assassin’s Creed IV: Freedom Cry.” Assignments include a weekly journal, two exams, and a final paper.

ENGL 438D.001  -  AFRICAN LITERATURE TR 10:05-11:20 GULICK

In her 2014 single “Flawless,” Beyoncé Knowles sampled a TED talk by Nigerian novelist Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie. Three years earlier, a young adult fantasy novel by Nnedi Okorafor was marketed as “the Nigerian Harry Potter.” From Twitter personalities to graphic novelists, African writers are rapidly gaining both popularity and visibility on a global stage. This introduction to modern African literature will embrace all this contemporary enthusiasm for new African authors through an exploration of the hundred-year-old literary tradition of which they are a part. We’ll read several twentieth-century “classics,” including Léopold Senghor’s poetry, Chinua Achebe’s Things Fall Apart, Ama Ata Aidoo’s Dilemma of a Ghost, Ngugi wa Thiong’o’s critical essays, J.M. Coetzee’s Waiting for the Barbarians, and Tsitsi Dangarembga’s Nervous Conditions. We’ll then put these texts in conversation with more recent authors such as Adichie, Okorafor, Teju Cole, Binyavanga Wainaina, NoViolet Bulawayo, Dinaw Mengestu, and Jennifer Makumbi. We’ll attend to how African writers from multiple historical moments have confronted the complexities of issues such as technology, gender and sexuality, humanitarianism, environmentalism, and national identity in a postcolonial-turned-neoliberal era. Recognizing that Africa’s contemporary literary culture is taking shape right now and often online, we’ll mine blogs and websites for current debates over what counts as African literature, who’s in charge of representing this diverse continent to a global readership, and what Africa and its writers might have to teach the West about itself and the world at large in the twenty-first century. You don’t need to be an English major to take this course; indeed, I’m hoping for a classroom populated by students with diverse disciplinary, personal, and professional interests and backgrounds. But you should plan to read voraciously, write carefully, engage with textual material that may be personally as well as intellectually challenging, and approach discussions with inquisitiveness, candor and generosity.

ENGL 439.001  -  TOPICS: TEACHING ENGLISH ABROAD (Cross-listed with LING 395.001/ANTH 391.006) MW 3:55-5:10 ROWE

This course will introduce students to the best methods and practices of teaching English to non-native speakers.

ENGL 439.002  -  TOPICS: CONTAGION TR 1:15-2:30 CORIALE

In this course, we will read literature by British, French, Caribbean, Russian, and American writers who explored the subject of contagious disease in their novels, short stories, essays, and narrative poems. As we make our way from the eighteenth century to the mid-twentieth century, we will consider how developments in the history of 8 medicine gave rise to innovative forms of narrative, and conversely, how stories and folklore inspired new treatments, cures, and models for understanding the spread of communicable diseases. Along the way, we will consider how our understanding of contagious disease detaches us from the writers we study and makes it difficult to understand the world as they saw it, but we will also search for vital points of connection—including live pathogens—that link past and present. Readings will include major works by Daniel Defoe, Elizabeth Gaskell, Mary Seacole, Katherine Anne Porter, and Albert Camus, and shorter works by Lady Mary Wortley Montagu, Nathanial Hawthorne, Charlotte Brontë, Guy de Maupassant, Henry James, Anton Chekhov, and others.

ENGL 441.001  -  GLOBAL CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE MW 9:40-10:55 JELLY-SCHAPIRO

This course will examine how contemporary literature both registers and is itself implicated in global forces and histories. We will read works that strive to apprehend the world at large, as well as works that illuminate the ways in which global culture is produced and experienced in local places. Reading novels from across the world, our inquiry will focus on the literary representation of several interrelated phenomena: capitalism, imperialism, climate change, and the conjoined problems of history and memory. We will devote especial attention to the question of how contemporary literature reckons with the longer history of the interlocking crises—economic, political, cultural, and environmental—that define our current global predicament. And we will consider how literary texts play an active role—as the repositories of narrative, as the agents of linguistic power, and as commodities that circulate in markets—in the constitution of our globalized world.

ENGL 468.001  -  DIGITAL WRITING MW 2:20-3:35 BROCK

This course will focus on writing in digital environments, exploring critically and creatively what it means to compose individually and collaboratively in emerging genres and modes of communication. Building on fundamental concepts of rhetorical invention applied to networks and interactivity, students will learn and apply principles of information design and web production to create multimedia artifacts for public and professional audiences in small-scale texts and a larger semester-long project.

ENGL 566.001  -  TOPICS IN U.S. FILM AND MEDIA: Complex Television (Cross-listed with FAMS 566.001) TR 2:50-4:05 MINETT

Explore contemporary complex television, focusing on the innovation of narrative design, the rise of the sympathetic antihero, and the quest for cultural legitimacy. Screenings are drawn from series including Lost, The Sopranos, Breaking Bad, Damages, and The Wire. Students will tackle a complex television series of their choice across the semester’s major assignments.

Prerequisites

ENGL 287.001  -  AMERICAN LITERATURE TR 1:15-2:30 LEE (Designed for English majors)

Our course will examine the literature of the United States from 1845 onward, and we will cover some major authors, themes, and movements from this period. We will also cover a range of genre and form, including novella, slave narrative, poetry, essay, short story, and novel. Given this emphasis on genre, we will consider the relationship between literary form and content—themes and motifs—that we might characterize as uniquely “American.” Our aim, ultimately, is to ask ourselves over and over again 1) what defines such writing as “American,” and 2) how “American” identity is crafted, negotiated, and redefined over time.

ENGL 287.002  -  AMERICAN LITERATURE MW 2:20-3:35 KEYSER (Designed for English majors)

This class, designed for English majors, provides an introduction to U.S. literature from the early nineteenthcentury to the present day. We will read poetry, short stories, essays, and autobiography by some of the bestknown writers of the past two centuries. During the course of the semester, we will ask how artistic choices (genre, form, setting, characterization, diction, and tone) reflect the aspirations, philosophies, and politics of these writers. We will also consider the ways that historical and cultural forces (industrialization, the Civil War, the suffrage movement, slavery and emancipation, the Harlem Renaissance, urbanization and mass mediation, etc.) shape the literary movements and ideals of their times.

ENGL 287.003  -  AMERICAN LITERATURE TR 10:05-11:20 BRINKMEYER (Designed for English majors)

An introduction to American literary history, emphasizing the analysis of literary texts, the development of literary traditions over time, the emergence of new genres and forms, and the writing of successful essays about literature.

ENGL 287.004  -  AMERICAN LITERATURE TR 11:40-12:55 GLAVEY (Designed for English majors)

This course surveys approximately 150 years of American literary history, running from the middle of the nineteenth century until the early twenty-first. Throughout the semester we will pay particular notice to the role of storytelling and the imagination in constructing the nation’s ideals and in addressing tensions that arise when those ideals are challenged by the reality of historical injustices. Our goal will be to attend to the ways that writers respond to those tensions with their art and to think about what such responses can teach us about the United States of America, its history, and its literature. Our guiding questions will be: What stories does the US tell about itself? How do particular ideas about America and American-ness shape these stories? How do these stories shape in turn what it means to be an American?

ENGL 287.005  -  AMERICAN LITERATURE TR 2:50-4:05 FORTER (Designed for English majors)

This course traces the history of literature in the U.S., focusing especially on the years from 1850 to around 1990. We will discuss major literary movements and their relationship to the historical moment at which each emerged. At the same time, the course will emphasize the persistence of certain concerns across the periods under study: the meaning of “freedom” and its relationship to the idea of America; the legacy of chattel slavery and the place of race in the imagination of white and black authors; the persistent attempts by women and minority writers to develop literary forms adequate to their experience; and the role of capitalism (industrial and consumer) in the literary imagination of writers from all backgrounds. TEXTS: F. Douglass, Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass; N. Hawthorne, The Blithedale Romance; N. Larsen, Passing; K. Chopin, The Awakening; A. Spiegelman, Maus I and Maus II; additional readings on Blackboard; REQUIREMENTS: 1 paper; take-home midterm; final exam.

ENGL 288.001  -  ENGLISH LITERATURE TR 11:40-12:55 CORIALE (Designed for English majors)

An introduction to English literary history, emphasizing the analysis of literary texts, the development of literary traditions over time, the emergence of new genres and forms, and the writing of successful essays about literature.

ENGL 288.002  -  ENGLISH LITERATURE TR 10:05-11:20 GULICK (Designed for English majors)

When William Shakespeare started writing plays, Britain was an island off the coast of Europe with a newly confident naval fleet and a queen who was decidedly uninterested in colonization. Four centuries and an empire later, the United Kingdom’s relationship to the rest of the world has changed considerably—as reflected in the work of its contemporary writers, many of whom have close ties to Africa, Asia, and the Caribbean. This section of ENGL 288 will set modern British literature in its global contexts. Beginning with Shakespeare’s The Tempest and ending with Zadie Smith’s White Teeth, we will explore the ways in which literary texts have both participated in and critically reflected on discourses of colonialism, slavery, empire, immigration, and national belonging. Other authors will likely include Daniel Defoe, Mary Prince, Joseph Conrad, Louise Bennett, and Salman Rushdie. In addition to reading voraciously and engaging in candid, generous discussions about these texts, course participants can expect to develop familiarity with modern British and Anglophone literary history, hone their skills at collegelevel literary analysis, and master the critical terminology of the study of literature. Non-majors are welcome in this class, but should be aware that the course is designed to prepare students for upper-level English coursework.

ENGL 288.004  -  ENGLISH LITERATURE TR 1:15-2:30 PEARSON (Designed for English majors)

An introduction to English literary history, emphasizing the analysis of literary texts, the development of literary traditions over time, the emergence of new genres and forms, and the writing of successful essays about literature.

ENGL 288.H01  -  ENGLISH LITERATURE TR 1:15-2:30 STERN (Designed for English majors) (Restricted to SC Honors College Students)

The survey is designed to give you a broad overview of major themes and concerns of English literature; this section will focus on literature from 1780 to the present. Students will learn to identify stylistic and generic modes of various literary periods; will be introduced to the historical underpinnings of the literature; and will learn 5 theoretical tools through which to interpret literary works beyond the scope of this class. Homework and paper assignments emphasize thesis development, concise writing, and critical analysis.

Pre-1800 Literature

ENGL 380.001  -  EPIC TO ROMANCE TR 10:05-11:20 GWARA (Cross-listed with CPLT 380.001)

A study of genres, characterization, and salient themes in five major texts: Homer’s Iliad, Ovid’s Metamorphoses, Beowulf, Marie’s Lais, and Chaucer’s Troilus and Criseyde.

ENGL 381.001  -  THE RENAISSANCE TR 2:50-4:05 SHIFFLETT

We shall study several major authors of the European Renaissance, some ancient authors they admired, and scholarship that deals with them. Requirements are likely to include an essay or annotated bibliography, a midterm exam, and a take-home final comprehensive exam.

ENGL 405.001  -  SHAKESPEARE’S TRAGEDIES MW 12:45-2:00 GIESKES

We will read seven plays this semester—which are generally labeled as tragedies, along with one that occupies a slightly different generic niche—deriving from almost the whole span of Shakespeare’s dramatic career. Our goal will be to read the plays closely as literature—objects of verbal art—and as playtexts—scripts for theatrical production. In addition we will attempt to situate Shakespeare’s plays in the context in which they were produced: early modern London. Shakespeare’s plays are intimately involved with that context and our reading will be enriched by an understanding of his times. As performance is essential to understanding these plays as theatre, we will be watching portions of filmed productions of each play. You may also view films individually in the Film Library in the Thomas Cooper Library. You will be expected to write a review of one of these films or of a local live performance of one of the plays on the syllabus should we find one.

ENGL 406.001  -  SHAKESPEARES COMEDIES AND HISTORIES TR 11:40-12:55 SHIFFLETT

We shall study plays that address ethical and political themes bridging Shakespeare’s time and ours. Comedies (and in some cases “romances”) may include The Merchant of Venice, Much Ado about Nothing, Measure for Measure, The Winter’s Tale, and The Tempest. Histories may include Richard III, Richard II, Henry IV Part 1, and Henry V. Requirements are likely to include an essay or annotated bibliography, a midterm exam, and a take-home final comprehensive exam.

Post-1800 Literature

ENGL 383.001  -  ROMANTICISM TR 2:50-4:05 JARRELLS

This course provides an introduction to the literature of the Romantic period. Students will study a variety of genres from the eighteenth and early nineteenth century and engage the work of a wide range of authors, including Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Robert Burns, Charlotte Smith, William Wordsworth, Dorothy Wordsworth, J.G. Herder, Edmund Burke, Maria Edgeworth, Walter Scott, John Keats, and Jane Austen. Some close attention will be paid, as well, to the ways that writers of the period highlight their attachment to specific regions and to the question of how identification with region or place – the Lake District, the Scottish Highlands, Ireland – complicates commonly understood notions of what it means to be British or modern or global.

ENGL 412.001  -  VICTORIAN LITERATURE MW 11:40-12:55 STERN

Forget the stereotypes about corsets and tea and sober black suits. This class will be an immersion in the luscious, long novels and twisted, kinky poetry of Victorian Britain. We’ll read marriage plots and murder plots; sensation fiction and melodrama; detective fiction and dramatic monologues. We’ll cover a range of forms and genres to give you a long view of key issues during Victoria’s reign (1837-1901): marriage and divorce; wealth and poverty; imperialism and civil rights; railway travel and armchair tourism. We’ll read among works from Austen, the Brontës, Wilkie Collins, Charles Dickens, George Eliot, both Brownings, Tennyson and more. Be prepared to read a lot, to write frequently, to talk avidly, to ask questions, to learn about archival research, to be surprised, and to have a lot of fun. Likely assignments: weekly reading responses, two short research assignments, and one substantive final paper.

ENGL 427.001  -  SOUTHERN LITERATURE TR 11:40-12:55 SHIELDS

Representative works of Southern writers

ENGL 428B.001  -  AFRICAN-AMERICAN LITERATURE I: 1903-PRESENT (Cross-listed with AFAM 428B) MW 2:20-3:35 TRAFTON

Representative works of African-American writers from 1903 to the present. For additional information, contact the instructor

ENGL 430.001  -  TOPICS IN AFRICAN AMERICAN LITERATURE: Slavery, Literature, and Popular Culture MW 9:40-10:55 WHITTED

How do literature and popular culture grapple with the historical realities of slavery? How do these representations shape the way we remember the past and relate to one another in the present? In this course, we 7 will examine how the experiences of enslaved black Americans are adapted through novels, comics, film, art, and new media. Our goal is to raise questions not just about historical accuracy, but about ethics and aesthetic choices, creative freedom, taste, and cultural appropriation. Along with studying select slave narratives, we will discuss the depiction of slavery in science fiction by Octavia Butler, a graphic novel by Kyle Baker, a romance novel by Beverly Jenkins, the satire of Charles Johnson’s novel, Middle Passage, and in screenings of films and TV series such as Roots, 12 Years a Slave, and Underground. We will also consider sketch comedy such as the web series “Ask a Slave” and video games like “Assassin’s Creed IV: Freedom Cry.” Assignments include a weekly journal, two exams, and a final paper

ENGL 431A.001  -  CHILDREN’S LITERATURE TR 8:30-9:45 JOHNSON-FEELINGS

This course introduces students to the field of contemporary children’s literature, encompassing picture books as well as short novels written for audiences of young people. Topics of exploration include (but are not limited to) the history of children’s literature, the world of children’s book prizing, the legacy of Dr. Seuss, the disturbing image in children’s books, and literary/artistic excellence in children’s literature. In some ways, this is an American Studies course; students will consider ways in which children’s literature infuses our culture—“There’s no place like home.” Students will leave the course with an understanding of central issues and controversies in the industry of children’s book publishing and the literary criticism of children’s books. Most importantly, students will explore the relationship between children’s literature and the idea of social justice.

ENGL 432.001  -  YOUNG ADULT LITERATURE TR 10:05-11:20 SCHWEBEL

Eight of the ten best-selling print book titles of 2014 were Young Adult novels. This course provides an opportunity to study the origins and current state of this rapidly-growing literary field in the United States. We begin by reading a selection of groundbreaking books published for teenagers in the 1960s and 70s, then turn our attention to the study of YA literature (fiction, nonfiction, and poetry) published since 2000, when the American Library Association established the Printz prize for excellence in young adult writing. The rise of YA literature has been accompanied by the blossoming of Children’s Literature as an academic field of study. This course devotes significant attention to literary criticism on YA literature. Note: English 432 is open to all English majors and minors, regardless of whether they are pursuing the Secondary Education track.

ENGL 437.001  -  WOMEN WRITERS MW 3:55-5:10 CLEMENTI (Cross-listed with WGST 437.001)

What do women write about when they write about themselves? This course will explore memoirs created by Jewish, Black, lesbian and other minority women who use their personal stories as a window into family relations, social history, national history, identity formation processes, power relations in the home as well as in the world. From the diary of an 18th-century Jewish German merchant to American Pulitzer Prize nominee Maya Angelou, this course will focus on the female autobiographical voice in various literary forms (novel, graphic novel, essay, etc.) with some important interdisciplinary detours through film, music and the arts as well.

ENGL 438D.001  -  AFRICAN LITERATURE TR 10:05-11:20 GULICK

In her 2014 single “Flawless,” Beyoncé Knowles sampled a TED talk by Nigerian novelist Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie. Three years earlier, a young adult fantasy novel by Nnedi Okorafor was marketed as “the Nigerian Harry Potter.” From Twitter personalities to graphic novelists, African writers are rapidly gaining both popularity and visibility on a global stage. This introduction to modern African literature will embrace all this contemporary enthusiasm for new African authors through an exploration of the hundred-year-old literary tradition of which they are a part. We’ll read several twentieth-century “classics,” including Léopold Senghor’s poetry, Chinua Achebe’s Things Fall Apart, Ama Ata Aidoo’s Dilemma of a Ghost, Ngugi wa Thiong’o’s critical essays, J.M. Coetzee’s Waiting for the Barbarians, and Tsitsi Dangarembga’s Nervous Conditions. We’ll then put these texts in conversation with more recent authors such as Adichie, Okorafor, Teju Cole, Binyavanga Wainaina, NoViolet Bulawayo, Dinaw Mengestu, and Jennifer Makumbi. We’ll attend to how African writers from multiple historical moments have confronted the complexities of issues such as technology, gender and sexuality, humanitarianism, environmentalism, and national identity in a postcolonial-turned-neoliberal era. Recognizing that Africa’s contemporary literary culture is taking shape right now and often online, we’ll mine blogs and websites for current debates over what counts as African literature, who’s in charge of representing this diverse continent to a global readership, and what Africa and its writers might have to teach the West about itself and the world at large in the twenty-first century. You don’t need to be an English major to take this course; indeed, I’m hoping for a classroom populated by students with diverse disciplinary, personal, and professional interests and backgrounds. But you should plan to read voraciously, write carefully, engage with textual material that may be personally as well as intellectually challenging, and approach discussions with inquisitiveness, candor and generosity.

ENGL 441.001  -  GLOBAL CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE MW 9:40-10:55 JELLY-SCHAPIRO

This course will examine how contemporary literature both registers and is itself implicated in global forces and histories. We will read works that strive to apprehend the world at large, as well as works that illuminate the ways in which global culture is produced and experienced in local places. Reading novels from across the world, our inquiry will focus on the literary representation of several interrelated phenomena: capitalism, imperialism, climate change, and the conjoined problems of history and memory. We will devote especial attention to the question of how contemporary literature reckons with the longer history of the interlocking crises—economic, political, cultural, and environmental—that define our current global predicament. And we will consider how literary texts play an active role—as the repositories of narrative, as the agents of linguistic power, and as commodities that circulate in markets—in the constitution of our globalized world.

 Creative Writing

ENGL 360.001  -  CREATIVE WRITING TR 1:15-2:30 AMADON

This course is an introduction to the writing of poetry and fiction. We will learn, as a class, ways of responding to creative work and use our discussions as a means of defining our own aims and values as writers and poets. The final goal of this course is a portfolio of original creative work, but peer response is fundamental; both will factor heavily in the final grade. The class will read works by contemporary and canonical writers as a way of expanding our view of what our writing can do. However, this course is designed as a creative writing workshop, and the majority of class time will be devoted to discussing new writing from students.

ENGL 360.002  -  CREATIVE WRITING TR 10:05-11:20 DINGS

This course is an introduction to creative writing which will focus on short fiction and poetry, one-half semester for each genre. Students will learn fundamental techniques and concepts by reading professional stories and poems as models; students then will write their own original stories and poems to be discussed in a workshop format by their peers and instructor. All work will be revised before grading by portfolio.

ENGL 360.006  -  CREATIVE WRITING MW 2:20-3:35 BAJO

This creative writing course will be a workshop for the contemporary literary short story. Early weeks will center around the study of contemporary short stories and poems in order to discover what makes writing fiction, and what makes writing contemporary. Discussion of the elements of fiction and the anatomy of story over the first three weeks will merge into class workshops on student story drafts. Some attention will be given to the relationship between writing and publishing. In addition to showing students the craft of fiction, learning outcomes will also offer experience in the skills of informed discussion and presentation, the beginnings of professional collegiality.

ENGL 360.H01  -  CREATIVE WRITING TR 4:25-5:40 AMADON (Restricted to SC Honors College Students)

This course is an introduction to the writing of poetry and fiction. We will learn, as a class, ways of responding to creative work and use our discussions as a means of defining our own aims and values as writers and poets. The final goal of this course is a portfolio of original creative work, but peer response is fundamental; both will factor heavily in the final grade. The class will read works by contemporary and canonical writers as a way of expanding our view of what our writing can do. However, this course is designed as a creative writing workshop, and the majority of class time will be devoted to discussing new writing from students.

ENGL 465.001  -  FICTION WORKSHOP TR 3:55-5:10 BAJO

This course explores the intricacies of the literary elements studied basically in English 360 to teach students how to write literary short stories. Students will use models and discussion to gain an understanding of the level of story composition at stake in this course, then they will begin submitting new stories of their own to workshop assessment in order to discover how to enhance readerly impact. The course is designed for writers aspiring to the profession or to students of literature who wish to deepen their perspective on language by exploring the other side of the printed page.

ENGL 491.001  -  ADVANCED POETRY WORKSHOP TR 2:50-4:05 FINNEY

Students will study poetry writing at an advanced undergraduate level through close readings of professional poetry, composition of original work, and regular practice in the evaluation of peer work.

Rhetoric, Theory, and Writing

ENGL 387.001  -  INTRO TO RHETORIC TR 1:15-2:30 ERCOLINI (Cross-listed with SPCH 387.001)

The term rhetoric, particularly in contemporary political discourse, is often used to mean empty speech designed to dress things up to look better than they are. Rhetoric, however, has a rich, complex, and important history that distinguishes responsible discourse from that which is deceptive, shallow, and unethical. Rhetoric can furthermore be characterized as an orientation, a way of seeing, and a way of knowing. This course examines this robust field of rhetoric in three dimensions: the history of rhetoric (particularly ancient Greek and Roman) as a set of practices, pedagogies, and ways of encountering the world; rhetoric as a critical practice of reading, interpretation, and intervention; and finally as the site of various contemporary theories and debates on the relation between persuasion and knowledge, the nature of language and its influence, and how everyday culture and experience perform important political and social functions.

ENGL 388.001  -  HISTORY OF LITERARY CRITICISM AND THEORY TR 2:50-4:05 MUCKELBAUER 6

On the surface, this course is designed to introduce you to some of the central questions associated with literary and cultural theory. Upon successful completion, you will be conversant with the many divergent strains of contemporary theoretical discourse (feminism, marxism, deconstruction, post-colonialism, etc). You will be able to respond to such fundamental questions as “What and/or how to texts and other artifacts mean?” “What are the roles of the author and the reader in the production of meaning?” or “How are social roles involved in this process?” You will also be able to distinguish different theoretical perspectives - from formalism to postmodernism and structuralism to psychoanalysis (and a host of others). More fundamentally though, this education in theory is intended to encourage you to challenge commonplace ways of thinking (about reading, writing, learning, education, sociality, your life, etc.). Therefore, the true “learning outcome” is that you will learn to (differently) pay attention to the world.

ENGL 460.001  -  ADVANCED WRITING MW 9:40-10:55 BARILLA

This course will be a workshop in creative nonfiction, in which we will explore advanced writing strategies within the genre through reading, writing and discussions of craft. Students will produce new creative work through various writing exercises, and will respond to work in progress from other members of the course in a workshop setting. The goal of this course will be to become familiar with the spectrum of possibilities in the nonfiction genre, and to produce a portfolio of original work.

ENGL 461.001  -  THE TEACHING OF WRITING MW 1:00-2:15 RULE

This course explores the theory and practice of teaching writing, mostly in middle and secondary school contexts. It is designed primarily to support Education and English majors, but will also be useful for students interested in college level writing instruction, professional careers in writing, and/or tutoring in writing. We will frame the content of this course with the concept of the teacher-researcher: an approach that emphasizes inquiry, reflection, observation, revision and redesign, as well as ongoing learning and development. You will conduct secondary and primary research, learn about important issues impacting the teaching of writing, and have the chance to evaluate and extend those issues toward building your own approaches to the teaching of writing, not only as a future teacher but also as a writer and critical thinker.

ENGL 462.001  -  TECHNICAL WRITING TR 2:50-4:05 HOLCOMB

Preparation for and practice in types of writing important to scientists, engineers, and computer scientists, from brief technical letters to formal articles and reports.

ENGL 463.001  -  BUSINESS WRITING TR 11:40-12:55 TBA

Extensive practice in different types of business writing, from brief letters to formal articles and reports.

ENGL 463.002  -  BUSINESS WRITING TR 1:15-2:30 TBA

Extensive practice in different types of business writing, from brief letters to formal articles and reports.

ENGL 463.003  -  BUSINESS WRITING MWF 12:00-12:50 TBA

Extensive practice in different types of business writing, from brief letters to formal articles and reports.

ENGL 463.005  -  BUSINESS WRITING MWF 10:50-11:40 TBA

Extensive practice in different types of business writing, from brief letters to formal articles and reports.

ENGL 468.001  -  DIGITAL WRITING MW 2:20-3:35 BROCK

This course will focus on writing in digital environments, exploring critically and creatively what it means to compose individually and collaboratively in emerging genres and modes of communication. Building on fundamental concepts of rhetorical invention applied to networks and interactivity, students will learn and apply principles of information design and web production to create multimedia artifacts for public and professional audiences in small-scale texts and a larger semester-long project.

Language and Linguistics (all fulfill the Linguistics overlay requirement)

ENGL 389.001  -  THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE MW 2:20-3:35 (Cross-listed with LING 301.001)

The English Languages introduces linguistics through an in-depth exploration of many aspects of English. We will examine the English sound system (phonetics and phonology), word structure (morphology), grammar (syntax), and meaning and usage (semantics). We will also consider other aspects of English, including its acquisition by children, its history as a language, and its social context.

ENGL 450.001  -  ENGLISH GRAMMAR TR 11:40-12:55 LIU (Cross-listed with LING 421.001)

• What is "grammar"? 
• What is corpus? 
• How is corpus-based grammar different from traditional grammar? 
• Is there one correct grammar that is suitable for all purposes and contexts? 
• Is the grammar one uses in conversation different from the grammar used in writing? 
• How is grammar manipulated to achieve various communicative functions?

ENGL 450/ LING 421 answers these questions by describing the systematic nature of English grammar as it relates to the contexts in which it is used and the speakers/writers who use it.

ENGL 455.001  -  LANGUAGE IN SOCIETY TR 10:05-11:20 CHUN (Cross-listed with LING 440.004)

This course examines language in social life and the social basis of linguistic patterns. We will investigate language use within and across social groups and contexts, focusing on how language reflects and creates speakers’ group memberships, interpersonal relationships, and social identities. Some of the issues we will address include why women and men may speak differently, how using a ‘Southern accent’ can help or hurt, and what happens when languages come in contact. Students will learn to think critically about their everyday sociolinguistic experiences using concepts and methods from the course. Special attention will be given to languages, dialects, and styles in U.S. settings.

By the end of the semester, students should be able to: 
• Identify key concepts in sociolinguistics 
• Become familiar with sociolinguistic tools for analyzing language in our everyday lives 
• Coherently articulate different perspectives on language issues in U.S. society
• Question assumptions about the inherent value of different ways of speaking


Challenge the conventional. Create the exceptional. No Limits.

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