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Presenter Name(s) Mentor Name(s) Abstract Title Session Time / Location Poster Number / Oral Presentation Time
Durant, Matthew Benton, Sarah Interning for the Governor of Rhode Island During a Pandemic
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Abstract Text

The summer of 2020 was not normal for anyone and that was no different in the Office of Governor of Rhode Island. As a returning intern for the State House, my position in the office allowed me to work directly for then-Governor Gina Raimondo’s senior deputy chief of staff. I was certainly never bored. I was part of the governor’s team evaluating the 13 institutions of higher education’s reopening plans and was tasked with backgrounding for her k-12 reopening plan based on current medical and governmental guidance. Part of my duties was to be in attendance for the biweekly White House Covid-19 task force reporting call with state, local, and tribal leaders and to provide a summary to the SDCoS. It was fascinating to be able to be in the room having discussions about the best way to reopen schools while knowing that 700 miles away, the same conversations were being held about Carolina. I found myself comparing what I learned from the medical directors in Rhode Island to the guidance being provided by the university, city, and state. I found that across the board redundancies were instituted to make sure that even though two practices didn’t need to occur if one was not followed, the other was still in place to protect the public. I also found that while UofSC had less strict policies than the University of Rhode Island, our cases numbers were only significantly higher a limited number of times. At the state level, Rhode Island did manage the crisis relatively better.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 249

Rugg, Hannah Amrol, Jennifer
Lindsey, Sara
Failure to Thrive: A Quality Improvement Project to Improve Z-scores through Parental Education
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Abstract Text

Background: Up to 80 % of failure to thrive has nonorganic causes such as underfeeding or incorrect formula mixing. When proper parent education is given, extensive lab workups can be avoided. Project Aim: The aim of this quality improvement project is to improve Z-score in infants and toddlers post-intervention by 10% through written feeding instructions provided to parents. Methods: In the Children’s Hospital Outpatient clinic, residents were educated on failure to thrive resources. For each child diagnosed with “failure to thrive” a detailed handout was given including amount and frequency for feeds as well as an optional feeding calendar. Patient weights were obtained pre-intervention and post-intervention and Z-score improvements were compared to a control group from the same Children’s Hospital Outpatient Clinic population. Results: Of 6 children who qualified for the intervention and received educational materials, 4 returned for follow up within the study period. Of the 4 children, 3 showed improved Z-score. Average Z-score change was +0.23. In a similar control group (n=16) average Z-score change was +0.20. Conclusions: While this study was successful in showing a 15% improvement in weight gain using this handout, there was insufficient sample size to prove superiority to current counselling practices.

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Columbia Ballroom (CMCC upper level)
 Poster: 165

Gleaves, Daniel Hu, Jianjun Semi-Supervised Teacher-Student Dual Neural Network for Materials Modeling with Unbalanced Annotation
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Abstract Text

Data driven generative machine learning models have recently emerged as one of the most promising approaches for new materials discovery. While the generator models can generate millions of candidates, it is critical to train fast and accurate machine learning models to filter out stable, synthesizable materials with desired properties. However, such efforts to build supervised regression or classification screening models have been severely hindered by the lack of unstable or unsynthesizable samples, which usually are not collected and deposited in materials databases such as ICSD and Materials Project (MP). At the same time, there are a significant amount of unlabelled data available in these databases. Here we propose a semi-supervised deep neural network (TSDNN) model for high-performance formation energy and synthesizability prediction, which is achieved via its unique teacher-student dual network architecture and its effective exploitation of the large amount of unlabeled data. For formation energy based stability screening, our semi-supervised classifier achieves an absolute 10.3% accuracy improvement compared to the baseline CGCNN regression model. For synthesizability prediction, our model significantly increases the baseline PU learning's true positive rate from 87.9% to 92.9% using 1/49 model parameters. To further prove the effectiveness of our models, we combined our TSDNN-energy and TSDNN-synthesizability models with our CubicGAN generator to discover novel stable cubic structures. Out of 1000 recommended candidate samples by our models, 512 of them have negative formation energies as validated by our DFT formation energy calculations. Our experimental results show that our semi-supervised deep neural networks can significantly improve the screening accuracy in large-scale generative materials design.

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 143

Ngom, Mam Ngaru
Anstey, Celine
Parker, Sarah
Ghoshroy, Kajal Lead Uptake in Germinating Mustard Seedlings
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Abstract Text

We are investigating the uptake of lead (Pb) in mustard seedlings. Our primary goal is to understand how lead-uptake affects the germination of mustard seeds, where lead is transported to, and stored in the seedling. Despite regulatory measures, the Pb contents of our soils have been increasing consistently due to rapid industrialization, agriculture, and urbanization, causing serious and widespread environmental hazards.  According to the EPA, Pb is identified as the most common heavy metal contaminant in the environment. Pb affects many organisms, including humans. It is easily absorbed and accumulated in different plant parts including plant roots. This leads to toxicity symptoms of the plant, such as reduced branching, stunted growth, reduced uptake of minerals, and blackening of root systems, among others.

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 126

Schoff, Kayla Dawson, Robin
Heiney, Sue
Understanding the Experiences and Perceptions of Twins Attending Different Colleges
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Abstract Text

Background/significance: Twins demonstrate higher intimacy levels than non-twin siblings and are often perceived as a “boxed set.” Consequently, many struggle to develop autonomy as they progress through developmental tasks such as the transition to college. Despite the 120,000 twin births in the U.S. annually, the myopic research focus on twin genetics means limited research exists on twins’ lived experiences in college. Data are needed on twins attending different colleges, who may have additional challenges navigating their first long-term separation from their twin. Purpose: The purpose of this qualitative, descriptive research was to explore the experiences and perceptions of the individuation process in twins attending different colleges. Methods: Study procedures were guided by the Transitions theoretical framework. Twenty-one participants from U.S. colleges/universities were recruited through convenience/snowball sampling and invited via email. Qualitative data included semi-structured interviews recorded via Microsoft Teams, which were transcribed and analyzed using the six-step thematic analysis process. Results: The sample consisted of seven males and fourteen females. Attending a different college allowed participants to socialize without the presence of their twin, explore unique aspects of their identity, and appreciate a newfound sense of individuality. Some perceived the transition as difficult due to a feeling of loss of support and the effort required to maintain communication. Despite these challenges, the participants perceived the experience as positive and anticipated it would result in long-term benefits as they both became self-sufficient, independent adults. Conclusion/implications: Health care providers, educators, and families may better understand and support twins through transition to different colleges to help prevent maladaptation or adverse psychological effects. Future research should focus on larger and more diverse samples, as well as use a dyadic interview approach with twin pairs to explore similarities and differences in experiences.

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 38

Wells, Ian Van Fleit, Krista What is the Power of the Emperor to Us? Anarchism and Discourses of Modernity in the Late Qing
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Abstract Text

This article offers a brief exploration of the origins and impact of the Chinese anarchist movement from 1899 to 1907, focusing on an analysis of Liu Shipei’s work in the anarchist journal Tianyibao (later renamed to Tianyi). The purpose of this analysis is to illustrate that anarchism in early twentieth century China was neither entirely a European import nor simply a revival of Chinese philosophical traditions, but rather a complex synthesis of internal and external influences; one which contained within it unique potential trajectories for a nation just beginning a process of self-assertion and self-definition in a world dominated by global capitalism. A fervent anti-imperialist, Liu’s conception of an anarchism deeply rooted in both Chinese tradition can provide modern readers with a counterpoint to the chauvinist view popular with nineteenth- and twentieth-century historians of China that foreign influences functioned as a wholly progressive, “modernizing” force. Liu was among the first Chinese thinkers to wield a radically egalitarian and universalist philosophy which refuted not only the subjugation of China to the gunboats, markets, and teleologies of the West, but also the crude evolutionism and state-building projects of his peers.

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 5

Beson, McLean Moran, Michael Morgellons Penii: A Case Report
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Abstract Text

Morgellons Penii: A Case Report. McLean Beson, Hannah E. Moreland, Michael E. Moran, M.D., Prisma Health, University of South Carolina, Columbia, S.C. Morgellons is a rare illness with a fascinating history and no previously reported cases involving the genitalia. It is a delusional skin disease of unknown etiology that is poorly understood, but characterized as perceived sensations of crawling, biting, stinging, and possible dermatologic disfiguration. The sensations are accompanied with the perception of foreign objects, typically fibers or filaments, within the skin that may be felt or visibly protrude from lesions in the skin. The etiology of the illness may be of a delusional parasitosis with the skin lesions having long thought to be self-inflicted secondary to perceived sensation of the foreign filaments. We report a case of Morgellons penii and a historical review of the disease.

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Columbia Ballroom (CMCC upper level)
 Poster: 102

Matta, Claire Lang, Susan Characterization and Preservation of a Hydrothermal Vent Chimney for Museum Display
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Abstract Text

Hydrothermal vents are formed when seawater percolates through cracks and fissures in the seafloor and then reemerges (after being heated) containing dissolved minerals from the seafloor bedrock. When the heated seawater mixture reencounters cold seawater, the hot rising fluid precipitates the minerals as towering rock structures called hydrothermal vent chimneys. After being discovered only recently in the 1970s, research conducted on hydrothermal vent systems have revealed that they host a unique, biodiverse ecosystem where chemosynthetic bacteria thrive in the superheated, chemically rich conditions and act as primary producers. The extraordinary biogeochemistry in these ecosystems -supported by the nutrient rich fluid that flows from the chimneys- are highly important in regulating ocean chemistry and understanding nutrient cycling in the world’s oceans. Recently, Dr. Susan Lang and her lab collected a black smoker chimney rock sample from the Piccard Vent Field at the Mid-Cayman Rise. Obtaining a chimney rock sample- or other similar deep-sea features- is a rarity, so public access to them and education about them is also exceedingly uncommon. Thus, this sample presents the ideal circumstance to educate the public about seafloor vent systems and garner greater support for the research of them. To achieve this, chemical analysis will be performed on the chimney rock, then it will be preserved as an artifact for display at the USC McKissick Museum. The chemical characterization of the rock will contribute to the greater understanding of black smoker vent composition, and its results will be displayed in the exhibit. Those results in combination with video footage taken from the sampling site of the chimney’s collection will help create an accurate, informative, and concise display of the chimney fulfilling the objective of scientific communication.

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 116

Isaac, Adam Jindal, Meenu A Pain In The Leg: A Concerning Case From A Common Complaint
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Abstract Text

Limb pain is a frequent complaint of patients seen in primary care and the differential is often broad. Obtaining a thorough history help distinguish an acute cause from chronic complaints. We will present a case that highlights a rare diagnosis manifesting as a common complaint. A 58-year-old female with a past medical history of hypertension, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and stage IV chronic kidney disease presented to her primary care physician with right leg swelling and pain for five days. She localized pain proximal to her right knee anteriorly. She denied preceding trauma, history of blood clots, or similar episode of prior leg pain. She endorsed acute onset swelling, erythema, and warmth in the right thigh for five days. She denied preceding fever, chills, rash, chest pain, or acute worsening of dyspnea. Her home medications were Amlodipine, Carvedilol, Novolog 70/30, and Atorvastatin. Physical exam revealed a blood pressure of 203/118, a heart rate around 100 without audible irregularity, and a right thigh that was larger than the left, warm, and tender. There was no crepitus, fluctuance, mass, or rash. Dorsalis pedis and posterior tibial pulses were 2+ bilaterally. The patient was admitted to the hospital where labs were initially unremarkable, including a creatine kinase. Vascular ultrasound of the right leg was negative for venous thrombosis. MRI without contrast of the right femur revealed inflammatory changes in the interfascial spaces, as well as a fluid collection within the distal vastus medialis. This was initially felt to represent diabetic myonecrosis, but the patient later became hypothermic, had an elevation in white blood cell count to 22,000, and received empiric antibiotics as treatment for pyomyositis. The patient’s leg pain resolved over the next month. Hypothermia, leukocytosis, and a fluid collection in the patient described here supported the diagnosis of pyomyositis. There are three stages of pyomyositis, with stage one just requiring treatment with antibiotics. The differential diagnosis includes spontaneous gangrenous myositis, necrotizing fasciitis, and acute venous thrombosis. Given the high prevalence of predisposing conditions, the diagnosis of pyomyositis warrants consideration in patients with acute limb pain and diabetes mellitus.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Columbia Ballroom (CMCC upper level)
 Poster: 88

Doyle, Sarah Sandberg, William Impact of Experiential Learning in Undergraduate Entrepreneurship Courses at the University of South Carolina
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Abstract Text

In this work at the Darla Moore School of Business (DMSB), I studied the impact of experiential learning courses on students’ education in the Undergraduate Entrepreneurship Program. I sought to statistically analyze students’ self- assessed confidence in entrepreneur attributes and applying those classroom skills to the workplace after graduation. In addition, I will be showcasing my personal startup project that offers pro-bono consulting services to students across the globe and a personal statement regarding its impact on my learning.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Carolina Room (CMCC lower level)
Time: 9:50-10:00am+5Q&A 

Manion, Brittany Fu, Zhengqing Identification of Pathogen and Salicylic Acid-Induced Apoplastic Peptides
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Abstract Text

Plant diseases caused by fungal, bacterial, oomycete, viral, and nematode pathogens pose serious threats to global food security by reducing crop yields by 10-30% worldwide every year. Facing these challenges from pathogens, plants have developed several layers of defense strategies to protect themselves. In response to pathogenic infection, plant immunity is likely regulated by apoplastic peptides. The plant defense hormone salicylic acid (SA) also plays a pivotal role in plant immunity. However, the amount and type of peptides that are induced in plant apoplast upon pathogen infection and SA treatment are still unknown. Arabidopsis plants were infected by the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae or sprayed with 0.5 mM SA or water (mock treatment). The peptides that were identified in at least three SA-treated or pathogen-infected trials were selected. Among them, 1 peptide was derived from pathogenesis-related protein 1 (PR1), 22 peptides were derived from PR2, and 5 peptides were cleaved from PR5. Further studies will be conducted to investigate the mechanisms of these peptides in plant-pathogen interactions.

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 102

Schmitke, Olivia Hills, Kim INVESTIGATING THE ROLE OF STRESSFUL LIFE EVENTS AND EMOTION REGULATION AS POTENTIAL ANTECEDENTS OF GRATITUDE IN EARLY ADOLESCENTS
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Abstract Text

The construct of gratitude has gained interest over the last decade along with the rise of positive psychology. Gratitude’s significant relations with psychological and psychosocial factors have been shown in prior research, although support for such relations in children and adolescents exists, to date the literature is more robust around adults. Additionally, presumed antecedents of individual differences in gratitude have been acknowledged. The present study included a sample of 1872 middle school students and aimed to build on previous work to explore the influence of emotion regulation (i.e., cognitive reappraisal and expressive suppression) in the development of gratitude among youth and adolescents, as well as how emotion regulation may influence the relationship between gratitude and stressful life events. Results of a hierarchical multiple regression analysis indicated that after controlling for demographic factors (i.e., SES, gender, race, and age) the reported occurrence of uncontrollable stressful life events and use of emotion regulation strategies (i.e., cognitive reappraisal and expressive suppression) added statistically significant variance to the expression of gratitude differences. Implications of these results are discussed. Future research should focus on continuing to inform the origins of gratitude as the literature around the construct continues to grow.

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Columbia Ballroom (CMCC upper level)
 Poster: 45

Thiria, Etienne Steck, Susan
Pellegrini, Christine
Kase, Bezawit
Devivo, Katherine
Health Behavior and Anxiety Changes During the COVID-19 Pandemic in a University Population
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Abstract Text

Objective: To investigate the self-reported change in diet quality, physical activity, sedentary behavior, sleep duration, and mental health among a university population of students, faculty, and staff approximately one year after the start of the COVID-19 pandemic. Methods: An online anonymous survey asked students, faculty, and staff of the University of South Carolina to recall health behaviors before March 7, 2020, and at the time of survey completion (between February – April 2021). Diet, physical activity, sedentary behavior, sleep duration, and anxiety symptoms were queried and means ± SEMs, frequencies, and percentages were calculated. Paired t-tests and McNemar’s tests were used to determine statistically significant differences by timepoint and between groups (p

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 40

Smoker, Brice
Jacques, Benjamin
Dumont, Guillaume Measurement of Acetabular Coverage: A Comparison Between X-ray, CT, and MRI
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Abstract Text

INTRODUCTION: Multiple angles are measured, typically on x-rays, to identify problems within the hip joint and assess the potential benefits of hip arthroscopy for patients. These include the lateral center edge angle (LCEA), anterior vertical center edge angle (AVCEA), Tonnis acetabular inclination angle, alpha angle (AA), and joint space (JS). Alternate imaging, such as CT and MRI, have been proposed to better assess the bony morphology of the hip for preoperative planning. Currently, no studies assess the LCEA, AVCEA, or JS on MRI for correlation with CT or x-ray. This study assesses the degree to which the LCEA, AVCEA, Tonnis angle, AA, and JS measurements on CT and MRI are consistent with measurements from x-ray films. METHODS: This study is a retrospective review of imaging of ninety adult patients who were treated with hip arthroscopy and had an x-ray, CT, and MRI of their pelvis before their operation. Two reviewers completed measurements on each patient’s hip twice, with at least two weeks between sessions. Intra- and inter-rater reliability for each measurement and imaging modality was determined via intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs). RESULTS: Inter-rater reliability for the measurements was moderate to good on x-ray (ICCs: 0.52-0.82), poor to good on CT (ICCs: 0.45-0.78), and poor to good on MRI (ICCs: 0.31-0.70). For one reviewer, intra-rater reliability was good to excellent for x-ray (ICCs: 0.74-0.93), good for CT (ICCs: 0.69-0.86), and moderate to good for MRI (ICCs: 0.44-0.85). For the other reviewer, intra-rater reliability was moderate to good for x-ray (ICCs: 0.58-0.79), moderate to good for CT (ICCs: 0.61-0.83), and poor to good for MRI (ICCs: 0.28-0.82). DISCUSSION and CONCLUSION: Rater reliability for measurements was typically best on x-ray, then CT, then MRI. The measurements were made reliably on both x-ray films and CT scans, whereas measurements made on MRI scans yielded less consistent results.

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Columbia Ballroom (CMCC upper level)
 Poster: 82

Kelly-Brown, Joe Palmer, Elizabeth Intersectionality in Cancer Care: A Systematic Review of Current Research and Future Directions
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Abstract Text

Background. In 2020, the COVID-19 pandemic and social justice movements such as Black Lives Matter brought health inequities, including disparities in both cancer care and outcomes, to the forefront of public discourse in the United States (US). To date, research on disparities in cancer outcomes has focused on individual or isolated marginalized identities, including race/ethnicity, geography, age, disability status, gender, sexual orientation and gender identity (SOGI), and socioeconomic status (SES). Intersectionality posits that social categorizations and personal identities are interconnected, rather than separate entities of a person. Objectives. The objective of the current review was to synthesize the literature on intersectionality relative to disparities across the cancer care continuum. A model to support future intersectional cancer research was proposed. Methods. Web-based discovery services and discipline-specific databases were queried for both peer-reviewed and gray literature. Study screening and data extraction were facilitated through the Covidence software platform. Results. Among 497 screened studies, 28 met study inclusion criteria. Most articles were peer-reviewed empirical studies (n=22) that focused on pre-diagnosis/screening (n=19) and included marginalized racial/ethnic (n=22) identities. Pre-cancer diagnosis, sexual orientation and race influenced women’s screening and vaccine behaviors. Sexual minority women, particularly individuals of color, were less likely to engage in cancer prevention behaviors (e.g., mammograms). Race and SES were important factors in patient care/survivorship with worse outcomes among African-American women of low SES, including all cause and breast cancer-specific mortality versus White women with high SES. Emergent themes in qualitative results emphasized the importance of patient intersectional identities, as well as feelings of marginalization, fears of discrimination, and general discomfort with providers as barriers to seeking cancer care. Conclusions. Patients with intersectional identities often experience barriers to cancer care that adversely impact screening, diagnosis, treatment, as well as survivorship. The use of an “intersectional lens” as a future clinical and research framework will facilitate a more multidimensional and holistic approach to the care of cancer patients.

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Columbia Ballroom (CMCC upper level)
 Poster: 131

Zhang, Yilun Behroozmand, Roozbeh Association Between the Beta Band Neural Response and the Behavioral Performance in Aphasic and Neurologically Intact Individuals
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Abstract Text

Introduction/Background. The complex motor act of speech requires integrating linguistic and sensorimotor processes. Sensorimotor interaction mainly supports speech production in the form of state feedback control architecture. While speaking, subjects react to perturbations in the pitch of voice auditory feedback by changing their tone in the opposite direction to pitch-shift stimuli to compensate for the perceived pitch shift. Aphasia is a communication impairment affecting patients’ speaking, understanding, reading, and writing. Hypothesis/Goal of Study. The present study aims to examine the association between brain neural activity and the ability for speech auditory feedback error correction in both post-stroke aphasia and neurologically intact individuals. Methods and Results. This study has 34 aphasic individuals (age: 61+/-11.2 years) and 46 neurologically intact participants (age: 64+/-7.9 years). Participants were asked to produce a vowel sound /a/ under altered auditory feedback (AAF) during the experiment. The vocalization signals were recorded, while EEG signals were simultaneously recorded from 64 scalp electrodes following a standard 10-10 montage. A multivariate linear regression model was fitted to examine the association between the EEG beta band power (13-25 Hz) and the vocal compensation. Results show a significant negative linear association between the two variables under the downward pitch-shift AAF condition. However, such association is not detected for the upward pitch-shift AAF condition. In addition, the aphasia group had significantly reduced power of beta band de-synchronization compared with controls. Conclusions. The findings of the current study reveal that diminished neural de-synchronization of the beta band activities is related to the poorer performance on speech auditory feedback error correction under the downward pitch-shift AAF condition. Such relation is not found under the upward pitch-shift AAF condition. The reason might be that the participants failed to reach the desired low F0 trajectory under the upward pitch-shift stimulus. Furthermore, the beta band de-synchronization is diminished for the aphasia group compared to the healthy control group, suggesting that aphasic individuals have deficits in the underlying neural mechanisms for the sensorimotor system.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Columbia Ballroom (CMCC upper level)
 Poster: 35

Stofik, Nathan Matolak, David
Sahin, Alphan
Measurement and Modeling of Low-Altitude Air-Ground Channels in Two Frequency Bands
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Abstract Text

The use of unmanned aerial systems (UAS), also known as unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), has grown dramatically in recent years, and this growth is expected to continue. For safe operation, accurate knowledge of the air-ground wireless channels that such vehicles incur for communication is critical. Over the past few months, we have worked on a project under the University of South Carolina’s Wireless Science and Engineering Lab (WiSEL). Supported by the University of South Carolina’s Office of Undergraduate Research’s Magellan Program, as well as the Honors College, we have been working on a project entitled Measurement and Modeling of Low-Altitude Air-Ground Channels in Two Frequency Bands. In this project, we intend to quantify some of the key characteristics of air-to-ground wireless channels for low-altitude UAS, extending other recent work of the WiSEL that has been supported by NASA. We report on the five tasks of this project. First, we review the state of research in channel modeling for low altitude UAS, and the implications this field of research has in the future development of UAS. We then describe the transmission and reception scheme we have developed with software-defined radios utilizing relatively wideband chirp signals for use in the L-Band (1-2 GHz) and C-Band (4-8 GHz). Our third task is laboratory functional testing before the key fourth task of actual flight tests with a small UAS (i.e., drone) in near-urban environments. Air-ground channel model development will follow the collection of flight test data. In this paper, results from the series of lab and flight tests will be presented. The project will also summarize the impact of this undergraduate research, as well as future directions.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 146

Eldridge, Andrew Hu, Ming
Hu, Jianjun
Genetic Programming-Based Learning of Carbon Potential Function for Materials Discovery
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Abstract Text

Efficient and accurate potential functions are critical to computational study of materials while searching for structures with desired properties. Traditionally, potential functions are designed by experts based on theoretical or heuristic knowledge. Here we propose a new approach to leverage strongly typed parallel genetic programming for potential function discovery. We use a multi-objective evolutionary algorithm with NSGA-III selection to optimize individual age, fitness, and complexity through symbolic regression. With a DFT dataset of 863 unique carbon configurations drawn from 858 carbon structures, the generated potentials are able to predict total energies with high accuracy and low computational cost while generalizing well across multiple carbon structures.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 143

Hulett, Caroline Su, Xuhong Do You Like My Tattoos?
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Abstract Text

Interviewing for a new position at an organization or applying for a promotion within your current organization can be a time consuming and nerve wrenching process for even the most seasoned of individuals. Now take into consideration that the applicant has visible tattoos, body modifications and hair that is dyed a non-natural color, do you find yourself looking down on this applicant? This is a constant thought for those with any blend of the three attributes. For the purpose of this literature review, the subject matter reviewed will take a look at the current studies that revolve around individuals with tattoos and topics including being tattooed in the workplace, wage discrimination, employment discrimination, treatment in the workplace and the generational divide and perceptions.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Columbia Ballroom (CMCC upper level)
 Poster: 11

Hati, Debolina Outten, Caryn Interaction studies of key players involved in the iron regulation of Schizosaccharomyces pombe
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Abstract Text

Iron is indispensable for the eukaryotic cell but iron excess is toxic. Disruptions in iron metabolism leads to numerous human diseases, hence the study of iron regulation and metabolism is of high importance. Iron homeostasis pathways of Schizosaccharomyces pombe are conserved across many species of pathogenic fungi like N. crassa and C. neoformans. Understanding iron trafficking pathways and regulation mechanisms at the cellular and molecular level in S. pombe will help design new anti-fungal compounds to combat pathogenic fungi. In S. pombe, the GATA-type transcriptional factor Fep1 represses the expression of several genes involved in the acquisition of iron in response to iron sufficiency. In vivo studies suggest that the monothiol glutaredoxin Grx4 and the BolA-like protein Fra2 inhibit Fep1 under low iron conditions with all three proteins forming a heteroprotein complex that likely involves Fe-S cluster binding. Using an in vitro approach, we are characterizing the Fe-dependent interactions between Fep1, Grx4 and Fra2. We have purified Fra2 variants substituting the conserved His66 & Cys29 residues to test whether these mutations abolish the ability of Fra2 to ligate an Fe-S cluster and participate in the inactivation of Fep1 under low-iron conditions. We are using spectroscopic techniques such as circular dichroism to study how the protein-protein interactions trigger changes in the [2Fe-2S] cluster coordination environment. Upon comparison of the CD spectra of the [2Fe-2S] Fra2(WT)-Grx4 with the variants, we observed dramatic changes, indicating differences in cluster ligation and/or chirality of the cluster environments in each variant. This information will be combined with kinetic assays of Fe-S cluster transfer to better understand the iron regulation mechanism at the molecular level.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Pastides Alumni Center Ballroom 1a
Time: 9:30 

Pollack, Charlotte Shtutman, Michael Development of an In Vitro System to Test the Inhibitors of Dead Box RNA Helicase 3
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Abstract Text

DEAD Box RNA helicase 3 (DDX3), an ATP-dependent RNA helicase, belongs to the DEAD-box family of RNA helicases that are present in all eukaryotic cells. These highly conserved enzymes are required for RNA metabolism from transcription to degradation, and they have a critical role in normal cellular physiology and disease progression. DDX3 has received recent attention as a mediator of viral and oncologic pathology, but I believe its potential for disease treatment goes much further than could be previously imagined. This protein has shown involvement in translation regulation, neuronal differentiation and migration, and cell decisions about apoptosis in response to biochemical stressors, making it a prime target for pharmacological study. Inhibition of DDX3 activity by small molecular inhibitors has demonstrated potential for the treatment of cancers and for the inhibition of the activity of viruses such as Zika and HIV. Additionally, our lab has demonstrated the neuroprotective effects of DDX3 inhibition and has suggested the utility of these inhibitors for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. To determine the potency of the potential small molecule inhibitors of DDX3, I proposed the development of an E. coli in vitro system for DDX3 protein expression and purification. This approach relied on the transformation of BL21 (DE3) E. Coli with several expression constructs with different promoters and purification tags in a variety of experimental conditions. The protein from lysed cells was purified through affinity columns and protein identity was confirmed with western blots. This study has revealed that DDX3 overexpression is likely toxic for the bacteria; therefore, we are investigating new variables for the optimization of this in vitro screening system.

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 94

Al-Sammarraie, Nadia Noggin inhibited bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP4) and prevented induction of apoptosis in motoneuron VSC4.1 cell culture model of acute spinal cord injury
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Traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) is a devastating mechanical damage to the spinal cord, most commonly due to road traffic accidents. Following the primary injury, a cascade of secondary injury process sets in promoting pathogenesis in SCI patients. The progressive pathogenesis in SCI is characterized by immediate neuronal loss in the lesion site due to necrosis and secondary neuronal loss in the penumbra due to induction of apoptotic cell death. Many studies delineated roles of different factors and actors that potentially contributed to neuronal apoptosis in SCI. Targeting those factors and actors so far have not significantly protected motoneurons in SCI animal models. However, the roles of each of the bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) in SCI remain to be revealed. BMPs are multifunctional proteins that have been shown to participate in the nervous system development and diseases. Among these proteins, BMP4 ligand has been reported to be elevated following SCI, mainly in the acute and subacute phases. It is linked to increases in both neuronal and glial cell loss and impaired locomotor function following injury. Autophagy in the nervous system is a well-regulated mechanism to recycle cellular debris and damaged organelles for maintaining the health of neurons. Autophagy is triggered during acute phase of SCI; however, the full process of autophagy flux is impaired and linked to neuronal death following injury. It is still unknown if BMP4 reduces autophagy flux and induce neuronal apoptosis in SCI. In this study, we used motoneuron VSC4.1 cells in culture as an in vitro model of SCI. Cells were treated with high concentration of BMP4 for 24 to 72 h under starvation condition (using serum-free media). MTT assay was used to assess cell viability. Enzo CYTO-ID Autophagy detection kit (Life Sciences) was used to monitor changes in autophagy flux. Immunofluorescent staining was used to monitor molecular changes in autophagy and apoptosis markers. Noggin, an inhibitor of BMP4, was used to treat VSC4.1 cells under starvation and molecular studies were conducted. Results showed that Noggin targeting BMP4 signaling enhanced autophagy flux and reduced apoptosis, suggesting a new therapeutic avenue for neuroprotection in SCI

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Columbia Ballroom (CMCC upper level)
 Poster: 176

Qi, Yiming(Krystal) Lewis, Elise International organizations
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International organizations play a major part in promoting academic success, cultivating personal growth, developing lasting friendships, pursuit philanthropic causes and fostering leadership. My most significant contribution to the University of South Carolina has been my commitment to improving the diversity experience at the University. Becoming a member of HRSM Global Community Club has greatly enhanced my college experience and encouraged me to strive for academic excellence, grow socially, and develop my leadership skills. Through the experience of serving as president and leading the efforts to successfully rebuild our chapter, I learned to think critically to solve complex problems, interact with a diverse group of people, and communicate effectively. My presentation will discuss the insights I gain about my leadership abilities as well as the positive impact diversity has had on my college experience and shaping me as an individual.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 157

Hong, Seoyeon Roy, Omar Lessons Learned From COVID-19: Strategies for Virtual Group Piano Teaching
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Due to COVID-19, many schools have transitioned to alternative forms of instruction, including asynchronous, synchronous, and hybrid formats, leaving instructors responsible for adapting their teaching to the format chosen by their institution. This transition has been essential in ensuring that education remains accessible and continuous. There is no exception for group piano classes due to the fact that group piano is taken by every music major, and addresses a large range of essential skills. Teaching group piano virtually can be extremely challenging for instructors of all levels of experience. Unfortunately, there exist limited resources on effective virtual group piano teaching because a pandemic of this magnitude has never occurred since group piano classes became a part of the music major curriculum. This project aims to provide teaching strategies for new and experienced group piano instructors who will be teaching their classes in asynchronous and hybrid formats and draws upon my own teaching experiences before and during the pandemic. Strategies include incorporating singing as well as cooperative learning structures into group piano teaching, teaching scales and arpeggios, and conducting virtual office hours. Attendees will also receive a handout that outlines these strategies, and provides links to other available resources for further review.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Columbia Ballroom (CMCC upper level)
 Poster: 15

Telford, Kira Meyer-Gutbrod, Erin A sensitive quantitative measure of gray whale body condition shows changes in condition within season and across years in Puget Sound, Washington
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Conducting health assessments on a population are an important step in understanding the trends in a population’s health, the factors that may be affecting it, and can lead to better management and conservation efforts. We report on the development of a new quantitative assessment method to measure gray whale health that is sensitive enough to measure fluctuations over months and provides a way to measure health across years. Past assessments had used a subjective 3-point scale to score body condition based in part on the dip behind the post-cranial hump. We measured the downward angle (using ImageJ software) to the dip behind the post-cranial hump based on a reference line from the post-cranial hump to a set point along the back of the whale. We tested this new methodology on a group of about a dozen gray whales (called Sounders) with a photo set starting in 1990 and that come to the waters of northern Puget Sound, Washington every spring to feed on ghost shrimp. We measured 783 photographs taken from 1990 to 2020 of primarily the annually returning Sounders and tested for the significance of changes by Julian Day, Individual, and Year. Julian Day (when controlled for year and individual) was highly significant and showed improvement of body condition even over the few months Sounders gray whales feed in northern Puget Sound. This confirmed that this approach is highly sensitive for measuring body condition changes within individuals (where we could use consistent reference points). This methodology will lead to a better understanding of the health of the population and provide the opportunity to compare the trends in health to shifts in environmental and/or anthropogenic factors.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Columbia Ballroom (CMCC upper level)
 Poster: 32

Lampe, Nik Pfeffer, Carla Transgender, Non-Binary, and Intersex Older Adults’ Perspectives on Aging and End-of-Life Care Experiences
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Research on healthy aging often erases sex and gender variation, thus ignoring the experiences of older adults (65+ years of age) living beyond Western sex and gender binary systems (e.g., female/male and women/men), particularly transgender, non-binary, and intersex (TNBI) populations. Most research on TNBI individuals focuses on young people and/or combines these identities with lesbian, gay, bisexual, and queer populations, which conflates sex and gender identities with sexual orientation and obscures distinct concerns of these vulnerable aging populations. This absence in scholarship often sustains a social context wherein many researchers and clinicians know almost nothing about the unique needs of TNBI aging populations. In this paper, I examine TNBI older adults’ perceptions of and experiences with advance care planning, aging, and end-of-life care. Data from this project derives from 50 semi-structured interviews with TNBI older adults in the US. I recruited participants by distributing study recruitment flyers, posting information about the study to social media outlets, using purposive sampling techniques, and following leads provided by community partners. Qualitative data were collected using semi-structured telephone and Zoom interviews lasting 60-90 minutes each. Interview questions focused on participants’ health, aging, and health care experiences. Interviews were audio-recorded and transcribed verbatim. I analyzed the data inductively, attending to how TNBI older Americans engage in advance care planning for aging and end-of-life care experiences. In this study, I tease apart the multifaceted health and aging consequences older TNBI patients face in a social world that normalizes and standardizes cisgender (non-transgender) and endosex (non-intersex) experiences in the context of aging and end-of-life care. My findings reveal that respondents hold significant fears around their future aged care and later life challenges. To minimize fears, TNBI respondents engage in coping strategies such as avoidance of end-of-life care discussions with loved ones, formalizing advance care planning documents, or carefully selecting their health care agents. This research produces knowledge that will assist in establishing best practices for reducing and eliminating health and health care disparities for TNBI Americans.

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Columbia Ballroom (CMCC upper level)
 Poster: 4

Pai, Dhruv
Angelidis, John
Whalen, Lexington
Bickel, Nathan
Dubinsky, Stanley The Wordification Project
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Literacy and its speed of development are key indicators of an individual’s success in life and society. The current typical classroom practice in the instruction of the English spelling system is word memorization. This not only is inefficient in terms of time, as much of the elementary grades are spent learning reading and writing, but also is inefficient in the sense that if presented with a new word, those who understand the system behind English orthography would be more able to fit it into an existing schema than those who only have learned via memorization. In the memorization-based approach, words are added one at a time to the students’ spelling lexicon, namely their everyday vocabulary. However, research that has been conducted over the past several decades has determined that words are better added systematically to the spelling lexicon by understanding their linguistic features. So, the question addressed in this project is how effectively can web-based spelling instruction incorporate linguistics principles to improve the spelling skills of early primary school students across different levels of spelling skill and different instructional needs? The goal of this project is to develop an application which provides accurate, personalized spelling training for students without relying on teacher classroom instruction. Wordification is designed to change this. The idea is to not only teach students of spelling in the optimal fashion, but to do it in a way that is fun. When completed, the project will have helped to create a more effective alternative to the standardized teaching of spelling in the classroom, and a widely available alternative to more costly interventions.

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 7

Ariail, Emily Gower, Michael
Atube, Kidochukwu
Development of Phosphatidylserine: Presenting Particles to Target Macrophages in Muscle Regeneration
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Due to the world’s aging population, muscle atrophy, or the abnormal loss of muscle tissue, is becoming increasingly prevalent. Most therapeutic approaches aimed at restoring atrophied muscle consist of prolonged physical therapy, which can have limited efficacy and be burdensome for injured or elderly patients. Thus, alternative approaches are needed. Healthy muscle does have some regenerative properties, and this process of muscle regeneration is mediated by immune cells called macrophages. A primary function of macrophages is to rid inflamed and atrophied tissues of dead cells, which they recognize by binding to a phospholipid, phosphatidylserine (PS), on the surface of the dying cell. Upon recognition of PS, macrophages engulf the dying cells and then release anti-inflammatory factors that aid in muscle regeneration. Our lab has developed biocompatible polymer particles that present PS on their surface like that of a dying cell, to target macrophages and facilitate particle uptake. It was hypothesized that these PS particles could also induce the release of anti-inflammatory factors by macrophages and elicit a regenerative response in muscle. Macrophages that were co-treated with an inflammatory stimuli were observed to release an inflammatory factor like those observed in damaged muscles. However, a co-treatment regimen with PS particles suppressed this inflammation and induced secretion of an anti-inflammatory factor that plays a role in muscle regeneration. Furthermore, we found that media containing secreted factors from PS-particle-treated macrophages could aid the growth of muscle precursor cells (myoblasts) into mature myotubes, characterized by an increase in average myotube width. Myotubes are the building blocks of muscle fiber. Ultimately, these results convey that PS-presenting microparticles could be further developed as a potential therapeutic for targeting macrophages and for the treatment of muscle atrophy.

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 105

Bailey, Patrick De Backer, Wout Cold Spray: A Design Study and Literature Review of the Electromagnetic Properties of Spraying Fiber Reinforced Polymers
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Cold Spray (CS) additive manufacturing utilizes highly pressurized super-heated gasses to spray microscopic particles on a substrate. These microscopic particles encompass a variety of material types including pure metals, metallic alloys, and ceramics. The kinetic energy of the particles being released upon impact forms adhesive and cohesive bonds between the substrate and powder. CS technology is a niche manufacturing technology which has new applications in the world of smart and hybrid structures. A literature review examines recent research involving CS and potential applications. In particular, the applications to Additive Manufacturing, Material Processing, Characterization, and repairability were reviewed and compared. The validity of CS and its applications are benchmarked against other manufacturing methods. Fiber Reinforced Polymers Composite laminates were sprayed with a variety of particle combinations including [Al, Zn], [Sb, Sn, Cu], [Cu, Zn] at discrete range of nozzle temperatures ranging from 200 °C to 600 °C. The samples’ electromechanical properties were examined to determine the viability of CS in additively “printing” circuits and forming bonded joints on the samples. Microscopy analysis of the samples indicates a promising path forward for implementation of CS additive in smart structures and hybrid metallic-reinforced fiber reinforced polymers.

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 147

Parker, Sarah Grewe, Maureen Interning on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C.
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During the spring of 2021, I interned with the office of Representative James Clyburn (SC-06) as well as the Office of the Majority Whip in Washington, D.C. This internship was part of the University of South Carolina’s Honors College Washington Semester Program. Students in this program work full-time and are enrolled in nine credit hours and must balance their professional and academic engagements. As a political science and history double major with a minor in anthropology, my internship provided first-hand experience to many of the political concepts I had learned about in classes. While interning, I was exposed to a variety of political issues that I had abstractly discussed in the classroom, but I was soon made aware of the personal realities of these issues. Interns are responsible for responding to phone calls and emails from constituents and drafting response letters on certain bills or current events. Specifically, I drafted letters about the Equality Act, government reform after the January 6 riot, and congratulatory letters to constituents. I also had the opportunity to compile and present several research projects to office staff on issues including health care and the criminal justice system. The work I did during my internship and my time living in D.C. illuminated my post-college career goals and instilled a passion within me to attend law school.

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 174

Colon-LaBorde, Monica Hancock, C. Nathan Determining if the Bases Adjacent to the mPing Element Impact Transposition
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A transposable element is a segment of DNA that can move from one part of the genome to another. mPing is a small, transposable element that actively transposes in rice. Our laboratory studies the transposition mechanism of mPing because this element is currently altering the rice genome and is being developed into a gene tagging tool for plant gene discovery. The established method for measuring transposition of mPing in Arabidopsis uses a GFP reporter. The GFP reporter only allows expression of the fluorescent biomarker when mPing is mobilized. We are attempting to determine if the bases adjacent to the mPing element affect its transposition. The consensus sequence that normally flanks mPing is TTA:TAA. Experiments in yeast show that the element excises more when flanked by TTA:TAA and less when flanked by GGT:ACC. Our goal was to make constructs that would allow us to test the effect of these flanking sequences in Arabidopsis. Using methods including PCR and NEB Builder cloning, we created four different plasmids. Each different plasmid contains mPing or mmPing20 (a hyperactive version of mPing) with adjacent TTA:TAA or GGT:ACC sequences. We are inserting these constructs into Arabidopsis together with a construct that contains the ORF1 and Transposase genes needed for transposition. These plants will be tested for GFP expression to determine the transposition frequency of each construct. We predict that the elements with TTA:TAA will have higher rates of transposition, suggesting that the adjacent bases contribute to the transposition mechanism.

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 87

Trimble, Natalie Corbett, Cynthia
Wright, Pamela
Taylor, Kimberly
Tricare Beneficiary Experiences with Pediatric Specialty Healthcare: Feasibility Study
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Background: Military children enrolled as TRICARE beneficiaries face a unique set of barriers to quality care that make them a vulnerable population within the healthcare system. When families move from one duty station to another, they must re-establish their care. Depending on the size and location of the duty station, gaining access to specialty care, particularly pediatric specialty care, may involve barriers that impede care continuity. Purpose: Explore the experiences of pediatric TRICARE beneficiaries in receiving specialty healthcare from the perspective of a parent or legal guardian. Methods: Participants (n=3) were recruited from the principal investigator's social network using social media and the snowball technique. Recruited participants were military dependents of active-duty spouses and parents (or legal guardians) of one or more children who have specialty care needs. After obtaining verbal informed consent, the participants were interviewed via recorded videoconference (TEAMS) meetings. Recordings were transcribed and qualitatively analyzed using low inference content analysis by the PI and three doctoral prepared faculty. Preliminary Results: Participant responses suggest negative experiences with the TRICARE specialty healthcare referral process. Participants reported delays in care due to inefficient referral processes, lack of specialty providers, low TRICARE reimbursement rates, and/or inexpedient medical records transfer. Issues were more pronounced following a change of duty station and in rural areas. Participants shared that the delays in care required them to advocate for their child to attain the needed care. All factors created discontinuous, delayed care and were perceived as negatively impacting children’s and parents’ health. Once specialty care was accessed, parents reported satisfaction with care. Conclusions & Implications: Participants reported common barriers to specialty care access, and care delays were a threat to children’s and parents’ health. Access to care was more challenging following a change in duty station and some locations (e.g., rural) had less access. The interview methods were deemed appropriate for addressing the study purpose. Additional interviews will be completed with diverse participants to reach data saturation and attain a comprehensive evaluation of TRICARE beneficiaries' experiences of pediatric specialty care and the implications for practice and policy.

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 27

Fanta, Rebecca Hughes, Ronda Implications of Discharge Communication in Health-Care
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Discharge communication strategies used by healthcare providers with patients provides instructions about their care. The effectiveness of discharge instructions affects patients' retention of information thus leading to adherence to their care plans. About half of adults experience a medical error after hospital discharge, and 19%-23% suffer an adverse event (including an unplanned readmission), most commonly an adverse drug event associated with patients not being clear about changes to their prescribed medication regimen. Structured and high-quality communication among healthcare team members and with patients and their families help patients understand what to do at home post-discharge. The goal of this project is to further decrease post-discharge readmissions and ED visits by implementing standardized communication strategies in hospitals. The patient populations that are most at risk for being readmitted are heart failure, chronic kidney disease, sickle cell anemia, transplant, neonatal, and post- gastrointestinal surgery, and pancreatitis. This will be accomplished by 1) assessing the association between enhanced nurse teaching skills and patient outcomes including satisfaction and unplanned post-discharge utilization, and 2) determining if the standardization of nurse-physician communication for patients with nurse-assessed low readiness for discharge improves mitigation of discharge readiness and reduce unplanned post-discharge utilization.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 32

Hawcroft, Anna Paul, Titan Nanoparticle Size Effect on Stability of Ionic Liquids (ILs) Based Nanofluids
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Ionic liquids (ILs) are considered as one of the potential heat transfer fluids (HTFs) for solar thermal applications where it comprised of base ILs and a small volume/weight percentage of nanoparticles. Dispersion stability of ILbased nanofluids is one of the challenges for make it as a viable HTFs. This paper presents the stability of ionic liquid based nanofluids for different sizes of nanoparticles and different concentrations by using visual inspection. The IL-based nanofluids contain 1-Butyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ([C4mim][NTf2]) and Al2O3 nanoparticle with 0.5 wt% and 1 wt% concentrations. Nanoparticles sizes are: 10nm, 30nm, 60nm, and 90nm. The results demonstrated that the ionic liquid’s stability generally decreases as nanoparticle size and concentration increases. Increased mixing time also improved samples’ stability but only for samples at a 0.5 wt% concentration. The 10 nm nanoparticles, the smallest observed, proved to be the most stable over the longest period when mixed for 90 minutes and concentrated at 0.5%. The most consistent trend was observed in the samples containing 30 nm nanoparticles, which were the most unstable across all mixing times and concentrations.

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 144

Dimery, Brenan Collie, Emily
Spence, Gina
The Story of Mental Health
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Storytelling is an effective way to destigmatize mental health and promote positive coping habits by humanizing common struggles. Storytelling also helps educate people on difficult topics in a memorable way. Convinced by a similar pitch, I joined the Mental Health Ambassadors at the University of South Carolina through University Health Services. After training to become an Ambassador, I was able to share my own story surrounding mental health with students just like myself, while opening their minds to various mental health resources. In sharing my story, I was able to positively impact those around me by proving to them that they are not alone. Additionally, I was able to vouch for various positive coping methods by explaining their value in my life. Though Ambassadors are trained to help others, I helped myself by becoming a Mental Health Ambassador. After one year, I joined the leadership team and became the president. As the current President, I am able to recognize the impact that this program has had on me, and other Ambassadors, in the past two years. Since becoming an Ambassador and sharing my story with those around me, I have increased my self-perceived value yet decreased my social anxieties. I have increased my awareness of the psychology of business and the importance of emotional validation. Yet most importantly, I have made some wonderful friends along the way. My presentation focuses on the impact of storytelling and explains how joining the Mental Health Ambassadors has helped develop me personally, professionally, and academically.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 182

Dorrien, Anna Grace
Clement, Alexis
Fitton, Lisa Validity of Scoring Sentence Repetition from Kindergarteners
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The purpose of this study is to analyze the accuracy of live, in-person transcription versus audio recording transcription on sentence repetition tasks from kindergartners. This study also looks at the reliability of scoring function words versus content words. The goal of the work is to contribute to further research on reliable and accurate identification of children with Developmental Language Disorder (DLD). We will be individually transcribing all audio files and cross checking them for accuracy. We will then code the sentences at the word level for function and content words in order to identify errors in the scoring of those words. We anticipate that we will see discrepancies between the live and audio-recording-based transcription due to the acoustic saliency of the function words, with testers tending to “fill in” function words during live scoring.

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 36

Niles, Madison Weist, Mark COVID 19: Social Isolation, Resilience, and Internet Usage
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Madison Niles, Darien Collins, Tristan Collier, & Mark Weist During the COVID-19 pandemic, it was required for citizens to maintain isolation in order to prevent spread of the illness. Education, work, and socialization all had to be shifted to an online, virtual environment. In order to attempt a return to normalcy, technology was used in place of going to school, to the office, or attending social gatherings. This resulted in increased social isolation and a higher reliance on internet usage. Previous research has shown that social connectedness is necessary to maintain wellbeing, and that coping by going online can relieve stress when utilized for entertainment purposes. However, when internet use is intended as a distraction for problems or for stress relief, it is linked to higher stress (Bartolini et al., 2013; Deatherage, et al., 2014). The following study intends to investigate the effect of social isolation on emotional resilience, with internet use as a moderator. 148 participants recruited through University of South Carolina’s SONA Psychology Participant pool completed a survey regarding participants’ demographic information, social isolation and loneliness, internet usage, and resilience. The Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support (MSPSS), the Problematic Internet Use Scale (PIUS), and the Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale (CDR), were employed to gauge the respective variables (Zimet et al., 1988; Caplan, 2010; Connor & Davidson, 2003). A multiple linear regression was then conducted to determine the effect of social isolation on resilience with internet use as a moderator, using the PIUS score as a dependent variable and the MSPSS as an independent variable. The second block of the regression explored the effect of the MSPSS score had on the PIUS score when considering the CDR scores. Although the results of the study were not significant, it was found that social isolation is a very mild predictor of emotional resilience.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 70

Lewis, Natalie Lewis, Timothy My Time in Carolina Judicial Council
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Carolina Judicial Council is an organization that partners with the Office of Student Conduct and Academic Integrity to consider student violations of the Honor Code and Code of Conduct. Members of CJC serve as ambassadors of the Carolinian Creed and organize events to promote the Creed throughout the university. As a member of CJC I served as both a panelist and hearing chair of conduct and academic integrity hearings. I would look at and consider information presented from the university, the student, witnesses, and professors to determine whether a student is responsible for a violation. I would also work on these panels to determine appropriate sanctions for a responsible finding. I attended Creed events and worked to promote the creed. I wanted to serve on CJC because I am interested in the conduct process and wanted to do something meaningful on campus. CJC was a great way for me to learn more about the university and be involved in a unique way. I learned a lot about people and the university. I also gained a lot of new leadership and interpersonal skills throughout these hearings. CJC was a great development opportunity, and I learned a lot from it. I was also able to meet and interact with a lot of people on campus. It was a great professional development experience. CJC is an integral part of the conduct process and allows students to feel that they’ve been heard. Being able to serve on these hearings, and give students that opportunity was very meaningful to me.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 178

Atube, Kidochukwu Gower, Michael Development of Phosphatidylserine-Presenting Particles for Targeting Macrophages
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Macrophages are essential immune cells that are found throughout the human body. These immune cells maintain homeostasis and help shape the normal physiological functions of major organs and tissues in humans. Hence, the roles macrophages play in human health has increasingly made them primary targets in studies aimed at developing therapeutics to tackle various pathological conditions. Nevertheless, there exist challenges with actively getting these therapeutics to macrophages. In a quest to solve these challenges, numerous studies seek to develop elegant drug delivery carriers in form of particles to get drugs to macrophages and modulate their function. Currently, most of these drug delivery particles have been made possible through complex chemistries and time-consuming post-fabrication techniques. Herein, we describe the facile development of poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLG) polymer particles that are surface-functionalized with phosphatidylserine. Phosphatidylserine (PS) is a phospholipid present on the surface of apoptotic cells. Similar to an apoptotic cell, PS enhanced the targeting of our drug delivery particles to macrophage by improving particle interaction and uptake by both an immortalized macrophages and macrophages derived from the bone-marrow of mice. The single oil-in-water emulsion/solvent extraction technique applied in this study not only allows for an easy batch production of drug delivery particles but has also been applied in developing various FDA-approved drug formulations. In addition, the polymer, PLG we used in this study has been employed in 19 FDA-approved drug release formulations, thus paving an easy path of potential clinical translation for our drug delivery formulations. In summary, we report the development of drug delivery particles that could be applied in future therapeutic interventions to actively getting drugs or bioactive agents to macrophages for better clinical outcomes. These drug delivery particles could also be applied to repurpose or improve the therapeutic efficacy of some of the 19 FDA approved formulations.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Columbia Ballroom (CMCC upper level)
 Poster: 17

Bellotte, Ashley Kubickova, Marketa Student Centered Teaching in a Creativity Centered Environment
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The spring of 2020, I completed an internship at EdVenture Children’s Museum under the educators who work there. EdVenture’s mission is to create lifelong learners and give children the opportunity to experience the joy of learning. The museum embraces every child’s enthusiasm for learning and teaches children how to continuously see the wonder in the world around them. These values are exactly why I chose to be a teacher. As an early childhood education major, I believe children are constantly learning, specifically through play. My experience at EdVenture gave me insight into lesson planning and curriculum development of STEM topics. I was able to lead lessons on engineering, chemistry, and biology to groups of students ranging from the ages of 2 to 12. Simultaneously teaching many children at different skill levels showed me how to differentiate my teaching approach and reach children where they are in their learning. The way our school systems are set up today with rigid schedules, standards, and benchmarks is not supportive of a child’s growth and development through play and learning. While classroom management and developmental milestones are important, I learned through my time at EdVenture that all children can learn in any environment at any time. They have to find interest in the topic at hand and they will soar through their learning. In my future classroom, I want to create and atmosphere of creativity and wonder where children of all backgrounds, cultures, and skill levels can thrive. I am anticipating the boundaries of standardized testing, but I believe that a deeply connected classroom community between my students and myself will allow the children to continue their passion for learning. Through this internship and my coursework at USC, I have also developed a passion for accommodating all learners. Every year, I will have a unique and diverse group of students with varying skill levels and backgrounds. It is my mission to meet each student where they are in their learning and needs. All of my beliefs will be projected through my teaching practices.

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 208

Lefkowitz, Olivia Lewis, Timothy Finding Home in All the Places I Thought I Never Could
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During my time at UofSC, there has been no other involvement more meaningful and fulfilling than my time as a University Ambassador with UofSC Visitor’s Center. I applied to be a University Ambassador my freshman year in search of a community on campus, and what I found was so much more. Working alongside some of the most dedicated and passionate individuals on campus has inspired me to become an involved and more passionate member of the Gamecock community. I work three hours per week on a volunteer shift at the Visitor’s Center giving tours, writing postcards, and answering the phone calls and emails of prospective students and families. These three hours are some of my favorite of the entire week. I have also served as the Front Desk Captain where I logged attendance and volunteer hours for the entire organization. I am currently serving in two different leadership capacities: Captain of Campus Visits and Captain of Professional Development and Training. My Captain of Campus Visits position allows me to check in families and gather their itineraries when they first arrive. My role as Captain of Professional Development and Training allows me to lead this organization of leaders through our weekly meetings while presenting professional and personal development plans.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 215

Oji, Njasi Zarrett, Nicole Connecting through PLAY
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The Connect Lab is a research team that emphasizes promoting the well-being and health of adolescents by assisting those who work most closely with youth, like teachers and coaches. I joined The Connect Lab in 2020. I had prior experience working with adolescents and I was interested in the projects that the principal investigator, Dr. Nicole Kivita Zarrett, had already published, so I applied for an undergraduate research assistant position. I was assigned to two different teams within the lab. The first team was called Small Groups, which had a focus on creating a space to discuss character virtues in order to decrease overall stress and improve the classroom environment. The second team was the Intervention Team, and its focus was to create and implement games and other physical activities on site, as well as interacting with the youth and staff. My roles were primarily to create content for the Small Groups manual, as well as teach and facilitate games from the Game Guide on site. One of our current projects is a study called Connect Through P.L.A.Y. that focuses on how the daily physical activity of underserved youth can be increased by implementing staff-based physical activity intervention in after school programs of elementary and middle schools. During my time with The Connect Lab, I have gained a better understanding of the importance of increasing the potential impact of school-based wellness interventions for underserved adolescents because our research has been shown to have significant effect on increasing quality of life and promoting health in youth. My presentation will detail my experience in The Connect Lab so far, and what insights I’ve gained regarding my communication skills, leadership abilities, and problem-solving skills which are all qualities that I feel that I have grown in immensely since I joined.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 51

Pickett, Sydney Lewis, Timothy Developing Passion from Extended Orientation
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Abstract Text

An extended orientation is an optional program developed by a university to introduce campus and campus life before students move in and start their college journey. It is designed to help with the adjustment to college by giving students upperclassmen mentors they can go to if they have questions, long-lasting friendships to carry on through their university experience, giving students exposure to diverse backgrounds of others, and producing fun memories of a “camp for college students”. At the University of South Carolina, our extended orientation program is called Pillars for Carolina, and I did not fully grasp what the concept was. However, as someone who is out of state, who knew no one at my new university, this program sounded like it was the kickstart that I needed to begin my college experience. Little did I know of the lasting impact that this program would have on developing my leadership skills, confidence, and personal growth, which eventually led to me finding my passion for working with students in higher education. Through this program, I was able to serve as an upperclassman extended orientation mentor for three years to first-year students. Although there were many rewarding aspects of the program the main value that I took away from the program was the value of mentorship. Being able to provide guidance about the university, interact with people from diverse backgrounds and have the ability to have difficult conversations about the trials and tribulations of young adulthood were all things I did not think I could do without the training and experiences Pillars gave me. Through this presentation, I hope to show how extended orientation not only helped me adjust to college but also served as a foundation for the development of my leadership and mentorship experience.

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 206

Saxena, Archana
Mitchel, Chandani
Staley, Shanieka
Wilson, Keisha
Wisniewski, PJ
Rutkovsky, Alex
I3C-Mediated Protection Against Colitis Dependent on AHR Expression on VIL1-Expressing Colonic Epithelial Cells
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Abstract Text

Many current treatments for ulcerative colitis (UC) often causes side effects warranting safe therapeutic strategies to control the pathogenesis of colitis. Current study was aimed to ascertain the possible role of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) in vil1-expressing colonic epithelial cells (CECs) during I3C-mediated protection against colitis. We investigated how intestinal regulatory mediators were altered in the absence or presence of AhR in CECs during I3C treatment under colitis or colitis-like conditions. We generated conditional AhR knockout mice in vil1-expressing CECs using the cre-flox system and induced colitis using the dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) model. Results showed that the mice with AhR deficiency in CECs (AV mice) lost the protective effects of I3C treatment during colitis and had a higher disease score with increased inflammation in the colon compared to the controls. Also, after treatment with I3C during DSS-induced colitis, AV mice were not able to prevent colitis-associated gut microbial dysbiosis even though flow cytometry analysis revealed AV mice were still capable of increasing IL-22 production by ILC3s in the colon. IL-22-ILC3 immune cell response was not the only major mechanism involved in I3C-mediated protection against colitis and regulation of the gut microbiome. Transcriptome analysis of RNA isolated from enriched CECs of experimental mice showed significant altered expression of several microRNAs, mucins (muc3 and muc13), and tight junction proteins in AV mice compared to controls. PCR gene expression data and direct effects of I3C on CECs using colonic organoids validated these results. In summary, AhR expression in CECs play a critical role in I3C-mediated prevention of colitis.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Columbia Ballroom (CMCC upper level)
 Poster: 182

Clark, Willoughby Lewis, Timothy Criminal Justice Reform Inside and Outside of the Classroom
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This past summer, I worked as a Criminal Justice Reform Intern at the American Conservative Union (ACU). The Criminal Justice Reform department of the ACU is a grassroots organization that is committed to fixing the criminal justice system in America through conservative policies that protect the dignity of people. After taking POLI 391: Crime and Politics during the spring semester of 2021, I was interested in applying what I had learned in class to a real-life experience in Washington, D.C., the home of our government. Throughout my summer at ACU, I researched, wrote, and edited letters and memos to governors and members of Congress. I also had the opportunity to write an opinion-editorial article that was published in a newspaper in Alabama. Through my internship, I learned so much more about our criminal justice system in America and the many reasons why it is broken. It was shocking to know how many great bills that were written to fix the system were shot down in state legislatures across the country because of seemingly small reasons. Finding out how many unjust policies put those who commit low-level, non-violent crimes in prison for years on end disgusted me. Juveniles everywhere are being sent hours, and even states, away from their communities and their families, which we know from research does so much more harm than good for the children, their families, and their communities. Knowing how much needs to be done to fix the system, I am now committed to educating others on the evils of the criminal justice system and what can be done to fix it. Through calling and emailing state legislators, attending rallies, and even voting, everybody has a part they can play in helping to make a positive change for those accused of crimes and incarcerated around the country, and in the safety of all citizens. I will continue to share my article and other helpful resources to encourage everyone to take a stand against injustices in the criminal justice system in America.

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 216

McDowell, Ian
Bulusu, Rahul
Sur, Sanjib MilliDrone: A Drone Platform to Facilitate Scalable Survey of Outdoor Millimeter-Wave Signal Propagation
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Millimeter-Wave (mmWave) networks rely on small, short-range base-stations called “picocells,” which should be placed optimally to be effective. So, extensive surveying must be done in order to ensure there is no significant capacity loss. Existing approaches to conduct indoor surveying do not work outdoors due to many outdoor environmental factors. In this work, we propose MilliDrone, a Drone-based system equipped with a mmWave transceiver and a Guidance platform, and is synchronized to collect depth, greyscale, and mmWave reflection profiles by following a specified programmed path. Using the datasets, we intend to explore a machine-learning model to predict outdoor propagations, and in turn, predict the optimal outdoor picocell placements.

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 150

Crooks Monastra, Jen Yee, Sean Planning and Teaching for Student Learning in Mathematics: How Graduate Student Instructors Develop and Implement Instruction
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The purpose of this study was to explore undergraduate mathematics teaching from the perspective of a graduate student serving as a first-time precalculus instructor of record. A multiple case study was designed to follow three mathematics graduate student instructors (MGSIs) through one semester of teaching to understand their goals for student learning, efforts to achieve these goals, influences on planning, and to identify challenges they encountered. For each MGSI, data collection included four interviews, three observations of teaching, weekly journal entries, and written assignments from a pedagogy course. A focus group, field notes from the pedagogy course, audio from mentor meetings, and mentor interviews also informed the data analysis. Dramaturgical coding was utilized to arrive at common themes across MGSIs related to goals for student learning and challenges. Findings indicated MGSIs aimed to prepare students for their future, develop students’ reasoning, sense making and understanding of mathematics, help students develop productive dispositions, and procedural skills. MGSIs challenges related to implementing lesson plans as intended, preparing to teach, and interpreting student’s course performance and preparation. Individual case studies describe each MGSIs tactics used in the classroom, perceived lesson strengths, additional objectives, and key influences. Findings illustrate MGSIs planning, identify their needs, and may be informative for mathematics departments and individuals working to support graduate students.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Pastides Alumni Center Ballroom 1b
Time: 9:40 

Carrillo, Andres Ozgur, Ince BMW Next GEN Internship Program
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According to the National Association of College and Employers, 61 percent of graduating seniors took part in an internship or co-op experiences during college (NACE, 2017). Internships are an essential steppingstone for any career path. Like many students, the process is daunting and filled with rejection. My opportunity to work for BMW was no exception. With the help of Darla Moore CDC, I was able to network with the corporation and premiere in their NextGen program. It is based in Spartanburg, SC, home to the classic X-series model cars. This semester-long program gives undergraduate students the ins and outs of what it takes to work at one of the top motorsport companies in the world. As a NextGen associate, you will quickly realize that there is much more to accomplish than your average internship. The program is set up to test your mental and communicative abilities in a German- American corporate setting. I, Business students, witness the immense value of the “in the classroom” experience within the office. Furthermore, awards go out to those with an outward mindset focused on meeting the goals, objectives, and tasks set forth by managers. In sum, BMW NextGen challenges its associates and sets the bar higher. Further along, this presentation clarifies my personal experience at BMW. It is worth mentioning that each internship is unique and takes an unorthodox approach, as discussed later. BMW rewards its associates for their own merits and abilities to distinguish themselves. As a representative of Darla Moore, I had the opportunity to take BADM 499 and interview managers and executives alike with Ince Ozgur. This was a crucial part of my success at BMW and the unconventional approach to a standard internship.

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 214

Cannon, Alkeiver Nagarkatti, Mitzi
Nagarkatti, Prakash
Effects of TCDD on Concanavalin A-Mediated Activation of Immune Cells: An Evaluation of Immune Cell Phenotypes and Molecular Signatures by scRNASeq
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Many studies on aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) mechanisms utilize the high affinity ligand 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). Though some studies show hepatotoxicity when this compound is administered, others show improved clinical parameters in inflammatory and autoimmune diseases under minimal exposure. In this study, we used single cell RNA-sequencing (scRNASeq) to determine the phenotypic changes associated with Concanavalin A challenge, effects that have been shown to mimic autoimmune hepatitis in humans, with and without subsequent treatment with TCDD. We found that TCDD lowered serum alanine transaminase (ALT) and proinflammatory cytokine levels as well as induced changes in immune cell clusters and differential gene expression profiles in liver mononuclear cells through scRNASeq. Interestingly, we found that in addition to activated T cells, memory CD8+ T cells, Kupffer cells and neutrophils, the percentage of mature B cells was increased following conA+vehicle treatment when compared with naïve mice or conA+TCDD group. Importantly, TCDD induced increased Regulatory T cells (Tregs). Further, many T cell and Kupffer cell clusters revealed migratory markers, such as CXCR6 and CCL5, and activation-associated genes such as serglycin (SRGN) and CD52 as the top differentially expressed genes. CCL5 was upregulated in naïve T cells, but downregulated in Kupffer cells from conA+TCDD group. Naïve T cells, Tregs and Kupffer cells following conA+TCDD treatment increased expression of the gene, serglycin (SRGN), a secretory proteoglycan associated with apoptosis. Of note, the adhesion-associated gene, CD52 was significantly downregulated in Tregs in the TCDD-treated group. It has been shown that CD52 is downregulated as T cells become activated. Thus, our studies support the claim that Tregs are induced upon TCDD treatment. Together, the data suggests that in addition to TCDD inducing proliferation of specific cell subsets, it is also capable of inducing phenotypic changes at the transcriptional level to affect the behavior of such cells. (Supported by NIH grants P01AT003961, P20GM103641, R01ES030144, R01AI129788, R01AI123947, R01AI160896 and R01AI123947-04S1)

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Columbia Ballroom (CMCC upper level)
 Poster: 66

McCue, Kaitlyn Schoenherr, Jessica Higher Expectations: Women’s Place in the Office of the Solicitor General
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Women face significant challenges to entering the world of the legal elite. While very few women become Supreme Court justices or Solicitors General, women do regularly fill roles within those organizations, whether clerks, staff attorneys, or deputy Solicitors General. This research aims to better understand the qualifications women must have to work in an elite political institution like the Office of the Solicitor General, if female attorneys that work in an elite political institution like the Office of the Solicitor General are insulated from unconscious bias that might hurt their chances of winning, and what their post-OSG career trajectories look like.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 4

Jackson, Hayn
Stickler, Erin
Trilk, Jennifer Do pregnant women perceive being counseled on nutrition by their healthcare provider?
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Abstract Text

BACKGROUND: The American Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics identifies a balanced diet and appropriate weight gain as two important components of a healthy pregnancy. It has been demonstrated that pregnant women had limited knowledge of the guidelines for healthy eating during pregnancy (1). Pregnant women were found to have “high levels of motivation and confidence” but “poor adherence to guidelines” during pregnancy (2). The aim of this study was to examine whether or not a population of pregnant women are counseled by their provider about nutrition during their pregnancy. This study expands on other studies by examining the entire duration of pregnancy. METHODS: We conducted an anonymous, voluntary survey using online software for women who are at least 35 weeks pregnant or have recently given birth. Each participant completed a 27-item survey using REDCap (Research Electronic Data Capture) software via email. Discrete variables were analyzed using Chi-square or Fisher’s exact test. Analyses are carried out using R statistical software. Differences were considered statistically significant at p

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Columbia Ballroom (CMCC upper level)
 Poster: 132

Lilley, Megan Ricker, Erin
Smoak, Tammy
Decreasing the Rate of Unplanned Extubations: A Quality Improvement Project in the Pediatric and Neonatal Intensive Care Units
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Introduction: Unplanned extubations have a significant impact on a child’s clinical outcome. Factors that have been shown to contribute are age less than 6 years old, inadequate sedation, loose endotracheal tube, upcoming planned extubation, and a nurse covering from another unit. Project Aim: This quality-improvement project aimed to reduce the number of unplanned extubations to less than 1.5 per 100 ventilator days (or 1.5%) in the pediatric and neonatal intensive care units over a 12-month period. Methods: Using the Model for Improvement, there were iterative plan-do-study-act (PDSA) cycles implemented throughout the year. PDSA #1: sent out a reminder regarding high risk situations and the need for two staff members during these times. PDSA #2: began changing out the Neobar every three days. PDSA #3: began spiraling tape up the Neobar to better secure it. PDSA #4: sent out a second reminder regarding high risk situations and the need for two staff members during these times. The number of unplanned extubations was assessed monthly throughout the quality intervention project and the equation used was: [# unplanned extubations / (# of vent days - # of trach days)] x 100. Results: Unplanned extubations in the neonatal intensive care unit decreased from 2.37% to 1.87%. Unplanned extubations in the pediatric intensive care unit increased from 0.99% to 1.12%. Combined, the rate of unplanned extubations was 1.69%. Conclusions: The rate of unplanned extubations was reduced in the neonatal intensive care unit by 0.5%, though it did not reach the goal of 1.5%. The rate of unplanned extubations in the pediatric intensive care unit slightly increased by 0.13% but remained within goal. Overall, the combined rate of 1.69% remained above the goal of 1.5%.

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Columbia Ballroom (CMCC upper level)
 Poster: 166

Thomas, Catherine Whitehead, Dustin Producing Film in the Age of COVID-19
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When I applied for the SPARC grant, I had intended on working in DC on an immersive theatre project. This was, unfortunately cancelled due to COVID. However, I was given the opportunity to work as a script supervisor and assistant to the director on an independent, feature film, "Holy Irresistible" with Iris Indie and Local Cinema Studios. We shot in Rome, GA during the COVID-19 pandemic, so precautions had to be taken to ensure the safety of the cast and crew, many of which were union. Besides navigating the new standards for production, I was introduced to an entire new art form. As a script supervisor, I worked very closely with the camera department, so I learned about their craft by observing them and asking questions over the seven-week shoot. I also learned about working with actors on camera from director Pamela Corkey. We had many discussions about the differences and similarities between theatre and film. Overall, it opened my eyes to a new possible career and strengthened my knowledge and skills as a theatre director.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Columbia Ballroom (CMCC upper level)
 Poster: 14

Jukic, Ana DeWeil, David Show Don’t Just Tell: How Hands-On Experience Solidifies Learning
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Abstract Text

As a pre-medical student, I believed that I wouldn’t have to revisit most of my classroom knowledge until I went off to medical school. As an Exercise Science student, you are required to complete an internship, or practicum as the Public Health school calls it, in a field related to your major. I knew I wanted to complete it in a field related to athletic performance, so I applied and was accepted to complete my practicum at Apex Athletic Performance in Lexington, SC and worked as an orthopedic rehabilitation intern. My main role included assisting physical therapists with patients’ treatment plan during their appointment if the therapist had several patients to oversee during that hour. This experience allowed to me continuously learn and reaffirm classroom concepts that I previously learned in my Exercise Science lectures from the past few years. In addition, I have also improved my interpersonal communication skills with patients and other employees at Apex while also becoming more independent in my role as an intern. I am grateful that my supervisor had confidence in me to work independently with patients and walk them through their exercise plan during their visit. I didn’t know it before, but hands-on learning strengthens and solidifies previous concepts better than a basic lecture that meets 2 or 3 times a week. Lectures contain a high volume of concepts and knowledge that are difficult to fully remember, especially when these classes span over several semesters. However, working at my practicum has allowed me to ask questions and see this knowledge come into play with patients that I work with each week. After this experience, I hope to attend medical school and pursue my desire to become a sports medicine physician where I can work in a setting just like Apex Athletic Performance.

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 187

Zorn, Kimberly
Allen, Elizabeth
DeWitt, Christopher Relationship Between Electrocardiographically Measured Heart Rate and Caffeine Intake
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Abstract Text

The purpose of our study was to test the hypothesis that caffeine intake may lead to elevation of resting heart rate (rHR) in individuals who consume caffeine. In the University of South Carolina (USC) Aiken Exercise Testing Laboratory, we measured the resting HR by using an electrocardiogram (EKG) rhythm strip in 161 consenting subjects (39 males and 122 females). A rate-ruler was used by trained investigators for accurate measurement. The skin surface was cleaned with isopropyl alcohol and the stratum corneum was removed with abrasion. Electrodes were placed on each subject and a rhythm strip was taken in a seated position. For all subjects, the mean rHR was 90 beats/min (range = 43-132 beats/min) and the mean caffeine intake was 249 mg/day (range = 0-1,230 mg/day). Twenty-seven subjects (17%) reported no caffeine intake. Both rHR and caffeine intake were higher in females compared to males. Normal sinus rhythm (NSR), HR 60-100 beats/min, was present in 108 subjects (67%). Sinus bradycardia, HR 100, was present in 46 subjects (29%). Linear regression analysis was used to determine the Pearson correlation coefficient (r2) between the independent variable, caffeine intake, and the dependent variable, rHR. For all subjects, the r2 was 0.50, for males, the r2 was 0.51, and for females, the r2 was 0.47. We conclude that there is a moderate positive correlation between caffeine intake and rHR. Key words: electrocardiogram, caffeine, normal sinus rhythm, sinus bradycardia, sinus tachycardia.

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 28

Thompson, Elizabeth Barrett, William Ultra Long-Term Toxicity of Prostate Brachytherapy
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PURPOSE: The true long-term toxicity associated with most radiation treatments is unknown. Prostate cancer patients survive decades after prostate cancer brachytherapy, with unclear long-term toxicity profiles. We therefore evaluated prostate cancer patients who had received I125 brachytherapy treatment (14,400 cGy) 14 to 24 years prior and assessed their long-term quality of life based on urinary, bowel, and sexual function. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We performed a single-institutional, retrospective analysis of 39 men who received brachytherapy between 1996 and 2005. Analysis was based on physician evaluations, lab values, and IPSS results. RESULTS: At last follow-up, mean patient age at follow-up was 80 years (median 81 years) with a mean of 17.8 years posttreatment follow-up. 15% of patients had experienced recurrence. Urinary symptoms were limited, with 0% of patients reporting dysuria, 13% reporting incontinence, and 33% on medication for urinary symptoms. Average times nocturia was 1.7 with mean IPSS of 6.4. With regards to bowel symptoms, 3% reported incontinence, 8% noted diarrhea, 3% had rectal bleeding, 8% noted constipation, and no patients required prescription medication for bowel function. 39% of patients potent prior to treatment reported being potent with or without medication. CONCLUSION: Patients who survive prostate cancer post-brachytherapy treatment have an overall good quality of life for many years to come. Urinary and bowel symptoms are limited, IPSS scores are generally low and patients that consider sexual function important at their stage in life are frequently found to be potent. Overall, the long-term side effects of brachytherapy are limited at 14 to 24 years posttreatment.

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Columbia Ballroom (CMCC upper level)
 Poster: 133

Lang, Clio Britton, Jeanne
Gavin, Michael
The Science and Application of IIIF: Experiencing History Without Traveling
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This project delves into the science of International Image Interoperability Framework (IIIF), its associated application programming interfaces (APIs), and its application to the real world, including UofSC’s Digital Piranesi, an interactive digital collection of prints done by the eighteenth century architect and artist Giambattista Piranesi. IIIF employs different APIs to expand the user’s interactions in experiencing a digital object. Real world applications include image viewing and translation, allowing for a user to maneuver an image without losing the quality of its resolution or displayed information. Uniform Resource Identifier (URI) sequences provide information to build an image manifest that APIs require. The manifest consists of all the information required for IIIF applications, such as open-sourced web-based IIIF image viewers like SeaDragon and Mirador. UofSC’s Digital Collections’ Digital Piranesi looks to analyze ways of converting its image viewers to instances of Mirador to allow for greater image investigation and research. This conversion is significant because a user looking at online Piranesi prints may zoom in and out and around the image while the annotations remain in their designated spot instead of disappearing; also, the user interface readily provides descriptions, authors, copyright, and image source information. Due to the value of providing Digital Piranesi users with this interaction and information, my research involves understanding the framework and anatomy of these information types so our group may program ways of generating our own manifests based on URIs.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 3

Horton, Kaitlynn
Brewington, Madisen
Schafer, Emily Adverse Childhood Experiences and Mental Health in College Students on a Two-Year Campus
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Nearly twenty-five years ago, the original Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) study was conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and Kaiser Permanente. Since then, much effort has been made by the scientific community to research the associations between ACEs (also known as childhood trauma) and various outcomes. The ten ACEs are, emotional, physical, or sexual abuse; emotional or physical neglect; parental separation or divorce; interparental violence; household mental illness, substance abuse, or incarceration. This Study consists of survey data from college students in a two-year campus in the rural southeast of the US. We first look at the incidence of adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) among this understudied population, and then analyze whether correlations exist between their ACE score and their scores on three outcomes measures – depression, anxiety, and disordered eating. The purpose of the study is to add to the limited literature on the connection between childhood trauma and mental health in emerging adulthood.

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 72

Davies, Abigaile Hastings, Tessa Barriers and Facilitators to HPV Vaccination in Rural South Carolina Pharmacies
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Objectives As many as 14 million people contract a new case of HPV each year in the United States, with 35,900 cancers found each year related to the virus. In South Carolina, rates of vaccination for HPV among 13–17-year-olds is 43% which is 5% below the national average. In rural areas, HPV vaccination rates are almost 10% lower than in urban areas. Pharmacy-based immunization services reduce accessibility barriers, especially in rural areas, as approximately 90% of Americans live within five miles of a community pharmacy. However, implementation of HPV vaccination in community pharmacy settings remains low. Therefore, the objective of this study is to identify perceived barriers and facilitators to HPV vaccination services among South Carolina pharmacists. Methods Qualitative interviews with pharmacists practicing in South Carolina are being conducted from August-December 2021. Community pharmacists practicing in areas with primary Rural-Urban Commuting Area (RUCA) codes of 4 and above will be classified as rural and invited to participate in my study. Recruitment will begin with a sample of 15-20 pharmacists and may continue until the point of saturation, when no new information is being gained from the interviews. Interviews are approximately 60 minutes in length and are conducted using a semi-structured guide. Interview questions are open-ended and designed to elicit barriers and facilitators to administering the HPV vaccination in a pharmacy setting. All interviews are audio-recorded and transcribed verbatim. Two independent researchers will inductively code all transcripts using Nvivo qualitative analysis software with inter-rater reliability of ≥0.70 considered acceptable.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 19

Zimovan, Kevin Harik, Ramy Investigation of Effects of Variable Gravity on Advanced Composites Manufacturing in Space
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One of the factors limiting mankind’s ability to become an interplanetary species is the cost of sending objects manufactured on Earth into space where they will be used. This can be overcome by manufacturing outside of the atmosphere and gravity of earth (space manufacturing). However, the change in gravity would have effects on the functioning of a typical machine that was not originally designed with this in mind. While 3D printing in space has already been made possible, an additional type of additive manufacturing that would prove useful in space is Automated Fiber Placement (AFP), a method of creating composite structures using a highly precise machine. The AFP machine and process would need a number of modifications to prepare for the challenge of variable gravity, some of which can be found through studying changes made for current 3D printing in space. The objective was to explore what adjustments to the AFP machine and process could be proposed to prepare it for the challenge of variable gravity, with the overall goal of supporting and enabling future developments in space manufacturing through building knowledge on necessary modifications for additive manufacturing to overcome the effects of variable gravity. This research centered largely around an extensive literature review conducted in order to determine changes and modifications that may be required for an AFP machine to function within variable gravity. It was found that the similarities between 3D printing and the AFP process were sufficient to create initial conjectures as to what requires attention for the AFP machine when preparing it for space. The functions of the 3D printer and the AFP head component have many similarities, thus changes to AFP processes will largely need to be focused within this piece. The AFP head contains functions for applying heat, the compaction roller, the material tape feed, and the cutting unit. Within these four component’s processes, specific research was conducted to understand how these functioned and how they might need to be modified. Through this project, an initial groundwork for investigating modifications to AFP in order to prepare it for space applications was developed.

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 146

Stein, Ailish
Mathias, Emily
Hourigan, Aimee Risk and Motivation for Change in ScreenU Alcohol
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How can we expand screening and brief intervention beyond health care providers? How can we better understand and serve our highest risk students? Screening and brief intervention has demonstrated efficacy with college students in a variety of settings. Personalized feedback interventions are identified as Higher Effectiveness in the NIAAA College AIM, although screening and brief intervention alone is mostly used in health care settings. ScreenU is an online screening and brief intervention program developed by the Higher Education Center which includes personalized feedback about use and risk without social norms information. This presentation will examine the relationships between risk, importance, and confidence scores as well as themes in motivation among high-risk students completing ScreenU Alcohol. We will also explore differences in motivation and scores unique to sanctioned students, fraternity and sorority-affiliated students, and other demographic groups. At the University of South Carolina, our students are consistently above the national average for alcohol use and related consequences. Over the last three years, we have added a screening initiative to our comprehensive substance misuse prevention strategy. In addition to the use of the AUDIT in Student Health Services, we have utilized ScreenU to increase the number of students accessing screenings. Since 2019, 4,786 students have completed ScreenU Alcohol as part of a conduct sanction, student organization presentation, tabling event, or other intervention. Of these, 36% were identified as Risky Hazardous and 12% as High Risk, compared to 23% and 6% of students nationally. First year students comprise 47% of the participants and male-identified students make up 58%. Our goal with this project is to examine the motivation, importance, and confidence of changing alcohol use among students completing ScreenU Alcohol in order to better serve them through screening and other initiatives.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Columbia Ballroom (CMCC upper level)
 Poster: 34

Encinas, Rodrigo Alhasan, Majdi Improvement Of Empirical Antimicrobial Therapy In Enterobacterales Bloodstream Infection Using The Extended-spectrum Beta-lactamase Prediction Score
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Abstract Text

Background: The extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) prediction score is a clinical tool that has been derived and validated to identify patients at high risk of bloodstream infection (BSI) due to ESBL-producing Enterobacterales. This quasi-experimental cohort study examined the impact of utilization of the ESBL prediction score on time to initiation of appropriate antimicrobial therapy in patients with BSI due to ceftriaxone-resistant (CRO-R) Enterobacterales. Methods: Adults with first episodes of BSI from CRO-R Enterobacterales at Prisma Health-Midlands Hospitals in South Carolina from January 1, 2010 to December 31, 2019 were included. An antimicrobial stewardship intervention was implemented on January 1, 2014 consisting of real-time alerts for positive blood cultures and rapid bacterial identification of bloodstream isolates using Biofire blood culture identification multiplex PCR panel I. The antimicrobial stewardship team recommended empirical carbapenem therapy in patients with high ESBL prediction score before availability of conventional antimicrobial susceptibility testing results. The student’s t-test was used to compare mean time to appropriate antimicrobial therapy before and after the intervention.Results: altogether 146 patients with BSI due to CRO-R Enterobacterales were included in the study, 45 before and 101 after the antimicrobial stewardship intervention. The mean age was 62 years and 85 (58%) were men. Three-quarters of patients (75%) had community-onset infections and the majority (59%) had a urinary source of BSI. Escherichia coli was the most common bloodstream isolate (60%) followed by Klebsiella species (29%). ESBL production was the most common mechanism of ceftriaxone resistance (77%). The mean time to appropriate antimicrobial therapy was 78 hours before and 46 hours after utilization of the ESBL prediction score in the antimicrobial stewardship intervention (p=0.04).Conclusions: Application of the ESBL prediction score as part of an antimicrobial stewardship intervention was associated with a clinically and statistically significant reduction in time to appropriate antimicrobial therapy in patients with BSI due to CRO-R Enterobacterales. Utilization of more advanced rapid diagnostics such as multiplex PCRs for detection of CTX-M15 and other common ESBL genes or novel methods for rapid phenotypic antimicrobial susceptibility testing may be necessary for further reduction in time to appropriate antimicrobial therapy in this population.

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Columbia Ballroom (CMCC upper level)
 Poster: 137

Weber, Courtney Richardson, Susan The Investigation of Per- and Polyfluoroalkyl Substances (PFAS) in Household Herbicides
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Abstract Text

Per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) are manmade compounds that contain an alkyl chain attached to multiple fluorine atoms, along with other functional groups. PFAS are manufactured because of their unique properties as a grease and water repellant. PFAS pose many threats to the environment and to human health. Because of the strong C–F bonds in these compounds, PFAS are slow to degrade when exposed to the elements, resulting in long term environmental pollution. In addition, PFAS bioaccumulate in the red blood cells of humans and wildlife around the world. In this project, various brands of commercial herbicides were collected and tested for these toxic compounds. The first step in the experimental process was to qualitatively examine the weedkiller liquid using fluorine-19 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (19F NMR) and quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (QTOF-MS). Although there were fluorinated compounds identified using these methods, the compounds proved to be active ingredients in the weedkiller mixtures, rather than PFAS. The next step in this method was to test the herbicide containers. A previous study conducted by the EPA indicated that mosquito repellant containers were fluorinated to increase durability, causing PFAS to leach into the repellant liquid. Using aspects of the EPA extraction process, the weedkiller containers were cut and sonicated in methanol solvent for several hours. The Soxhlet extraction method was also used, placing the container pieces in a reflux apparatus for several hours in solvent. The extracted samples from both methods were tested using the same previous instrumentation, 19F NMR and QTOF-MS. These results will be displayed upon data analysis. The 19F NMR instrument has proved to be an effective way to screen for PFAS and qualitatively identify their structures. There are very few publications on the use of this method for PFAS structural information, so this experiment was expanded to further the examination of PFAS standards using 19F NMR. The associated spectra will also be included in the results, as well as a description of each specific PFAS compound being analyzed.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 133

Grimsley, Sophia Hiscox, April Identifying Boundary Layer Structure from Aircraft Observations of Hurricanes
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Abstract Text

Accurately forecasting hurricane intensity change is important for timely hurricane preparedness and impact-based forecasts. Previous studies have shown that air-sea interactions and boundary-layer processes play a key role in regulating hurricane intensity change. Despite its importance, the hurricane boundary layer has been the least observed part of a storm, and how the boundary layer structure evolves during intensity change is not well understood. The purpose of this study is to identify key boundary layer structures in relation to intensity change by analyzing aircraft observations in Hurricane Irene (2011). A total of ~80 dropsondes, Tail Doppler Radar (TDR), and lower-fuselage radar data from 4 continuous reconnaissance flights into Hurricane Irene at different intensity stages are analyzed. Structural metrics including boundary layer height and moist entropy are evaluated. Both the axisymmetric and asymmetric boundary layer structure are presented. Finally, an analysis of boundary layer recovery over 2 reconnaissance flights are conducted. Results show that a) there is no apparent correlation between the axisymmetric boundary layer height and intensity; b) both the height of the maximum wind speed and the mixed layer depth increase with increasing radius; and c) surface enthalpy fluxes are enough to recover downdraft induced low-entropy air before the intensification period of Irene begins.

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 119

Sun, Ruixiao Chen, Yuche Cyber-attack Detection in Transportation Networks Using Machine Learning
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Abstract Text

Penetration of connected vehicles and crowdsourced mapping applications can lead to cybersecurity threats on transportation systems. It is critical to accurately and promptly detect cyber-attack to protect transportation systems. Previous studies investigated the detection of cyber-attack in refined transportation infrastructure, e.g., intersections. However, limited literature studied the detection of cyber-attack on a whole transportation network. This is particularly challenging because the traffic impacts of cyber-attack can be invisible on aggregated traffic monitoring data. In this study, we propose machine learning methodologies to detect cyber-attack on a transportation system based on the integration of microscopic vehicle trajectories and macroscopic road link level traffic performance data from a small number of road links. Specifically, one-class support vector machines, isolation forest, outlier detection with local outlier factor, and elliptic envelope are adopted to detect potential trajectory spoofing on a road network. We establish a microscopic traffic simulation platform for a middle size city to generate input data for cyber-attack detection. We construct traffic simulation scenarios with different travel time spoofing parameters. For each scenario, a subset of travelers is hacking travel time on their routes to divert non-hackers to alternative routes. The results show that sensing 14 to 16 road links can provide enough data for detecting trajectory spoofing on the whole transportation network of the simulated city. We analyze the impacts of travel time for hackers and non-hackers and present variations of traffic patterns before and after cyber-attack.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Columbia Ballroom (CMCC upper level)
 Poster: 21

He, Mason Rekhtman, Yuliya A Promising Movement: A Pediatric Algorithm for Constipation Management in the Outpatient Setting​
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Abstract Text

Constipation is a very common childhood problem that is seen throughout all domains of pediatric medicine. It is estimated that constipation accounts for 3% of all pediatric ambulatory visits and 25% of all referrals to pediatric gastroenterologists. In the general worldwide pediatric population, between 0.7 to 29.6% is affected with a median of 8.9% and up to 25% of the pediatric population will continue to suffer experience constipation into adulthood. The goals of this project are to reduce the number of referrals for constipation to our Palmetto Health-USC Pediatric Gastroenterology clinic by creating a pediatric algorithm for the evaluation plus treatment of constipation and to help educate the pediatric residents that run the Children’s Hospital Outpatient Clinic. This algorithm will be tailored with the help of the GI clinic to include additional medications to help open up the variety of medications that can be used in pediatric constipation. The hope of the project is to have an algorithm that incorporates the guidelines set forth by NASPGHAN into something that is easy to follow. Evaluation of the success of the algorithm will be based on surveys conducted with the referring pediatrician to see if the algorithm was able to help give them more tools for evaluating and treating constipation.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Columbia Ballroom (CMCC upper level)
 Poster: 81

Kuisel, Kate Sklaroff, Lauren An Investigation of Low-Brow Culture in the 1970s
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This study investigates primary source material of the deviation between low-brow and high-brow culture in the 1970s through examining issues of Vogue and Ebony in the microfilm archive at Thomas Cooper Library. The research aims to prove the suppression and appropriation of low-brow culture such as the whitewash of the disco movement. Currently, the research into cultural studies of the 1970s tends to focus on the mainstream culture of the time period. The culture of communities such as the LGBT, and the African-American communities, remain largely uninvestigated. I analyzed every issue of Ebony from every year of the 1970s compared to the four issues of Vogue available in the archives. The data was limited due to the scope of the microfilm archives available at Thomas Cooper Library. These two magazines were specifically chosen due to how Ebony epitomizes African-American culture throughout time periods, as well as how Vogue centers around female high-brow white culture. The two foil each other to demonstrate the dissonance between cultures in the 1970s. The methodology centered on analyzing stories discussing aspects of culture: fashion, music, film, television, decor, and hobbies. I chose articles based on personal evaluation and guidance from my mentor, Dr. Lauren Sklaroff. Oftentimes in cultural studies, personal evaluation is used to determine chosen data as there is no established methodology like in quantitative-based studies. I found that low-brow culture had separate aspects celebrated, while high-brow focused on completely different trends. The adaption of the disco movement in both music and style into mainstream white culture was most apparent in the research. Evidence of the rise of disco was seen in Ebony as early as 1972, whereas in Vogue the popularization of disco emerged in 1978 with the significant release of Saturday Night Fever. The falsification of the origins of these trends was apparent. The study found that high-brow culture is the focus of cultural studies and the culture of the minorities and discriminated groups become rewritten and adapted into what is considered more sophisticated in the cultural hierarchy.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 2

Collins, Megan Hancock, C. Nathan Studying the Transposition Mechanism of the mJing Miniature Inverted Repeat Transposable Element in Yeast
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Transposable elements are segments of DNA that can jump in and out of the genome. This activity can cause genetic mutations that either harm or benefit the organism. The mJing miniature inverted repeat transposable element is mobilized by proteins encoded by the transposable element Jing. These elements are found in Japonica and Indica rice, however, mJing transposition has only been detected in Indica rice. Our lab studies a distantly related element, mPing, using a yeast transposition assay that only allows yeast to grow when transposition has occurred. From this we know that mPing uses a cut and paste mechanism catalyzed by the two proteins ORF1 and Transposase. We hypothesize that mJing transposition also requires two proteins, but the exact sequences were not identified in the original description of this element. We set out to develop a yeast transposition assay to further define the mJing transposition mechanism. We first designed ORF1 and Transposase expression clones by determining the consensus of the proteins from three Jing elements and cloning them into pAG413 and pAG415. We also designed and made a plasmid that contains mJing inserted into the ADE2 gene. These plasmids will be transformed into yeast and transposition assays will be performed by plating liquid cultures onto galactose plates lacking adenine. By doing so, only cells with transposed mJing, expressing the ADE2 gene, will be able to grow into colonies. These colonies can then be analyzed by PCR and sequencing to verify if transposition is occurring in our assay.

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 99

Buoniconti, Drew Hollis, Fiona Establishing the Signature of Neural Activation Following Social Preference in Fmr1 Mutant Mice
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Abstract Text

The most common inherited form of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is an X-linked disorder known as Fragile X Syndrome (FXS). FXS is caused by a chromosomal expansion in the Fmr1 gene that leads to the inability to produce Fragile X Mental Retardation Protein (FMRP), which typically acts as an mRNA binding protein critical in controlling neuronal development and synaptic plasticity. This loss of protein regulation during development is thought to underlie the symptoms related to emotional and social dysfunction observed in FXS patients with ASD. The mouse model of FXS, the Fmr1 knockout (Fmr1 KO) mouse captures both molecular and behavioral phenotypes of the disease, including ASD-like symptoms of aberrant social preference. Several brain regions have been implicated in social preference behavior, including the prefrontal cortex and amygdala. To understand the biological mechanisms behind the lack of sociability in Fmr1 KO mice, we measured the expression of cFOS protein, an immediate-early gene product widely used as a marker of neural activation, in wildtype and Fmr1 KO mice under basal conditions and following a social preference test. By comparing levels of cFOS protein expression in the prefrontal cortex and amygdala between behaved Fmr1 KO and wildtype mice, we identified differences in neural activation induced by social preference behavior. We also examined whether there were differences in basal levels of neural activation in the amygdala between Fmr1 KO and wildtype mice. Our results identify differences in social preference-induced neural activation in Fmr1 KO mice, providing insight into potential mechanisms underlying decreased sociability in FXS. Future studies will focus on identifying specific neuronal populations within these regions that may be exhibiting aberrant behavioral activation.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 63

Gallichio, Jenna Ismail, Briahnna Supplemental Instruction to Future Math Teacher: Applying and Developing Math Pedagogy
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Abstract Text

As a math major with a cognate in education, learning and education have always been my top priority at UofSC. Throughout the last four years I have grown as a student, a leader, and a future educator through the courses I have taken and more importantly, through my time spent as a Peer Leader at the Student Success Center. I have had the opportunity to be a MATH 142 (Calculus two) Supplemental Instruction Leader (SI) for five semesters working with new professors and diverse groups of students each semester. As an SI, I learned how to balance my time, create effective lesson plans, advocate for myself and my peers, apply pedagogy from my education courses, create my own teaching pedagogy, and develop my teaching philosophy, while making new connections and furthering my experience in the field of education. My presentation will discuss how I discovered the importance of self-reflection and adaptability as a future educator while synthesizing all the materials I learned in my education courses and how I directly applied them to my role of an SI.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 162

Garner, Sydney
Giakas, Alec
Rhodes, Morgan Social Determinants of Health and HbA1c Control in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
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Abstract Text

A PDSA cycle was conducted as the first part of a year-long quality improvement project carried out by third-year medical students at the University of South Carolina School of Medicine. The aim of this cycle was to efficiently implement a Social Determinants Of Health (SDOH) survey into the workflow at the Prisma Health Family Medicine Center (PH FMC) in order to measure the association between SDOH scores and diabetes management. While diabetes is a complex disease that is impacted by biologic and behavioral factors, it is also influenced by the social and physical environments of patients. Traditionally, clinicians have focused on intervening with the biologic and behavioral factors. However, many are starting to recognize the effect that SDOH have on disease course and outcomes for patients. Over the course of 5 weeks, a questionnaire that was already a part of the electronic medical record (EMR) was used to screen 22 patients for SDOH. Time it took to administer the survey to each patient was recorded. Patient information, questionnaire responses, and diabetic outcomes (HbA1c) were also recorded in a password-protected Excel file. Numeric scores were assigned to each answer and a linear regression was used to evaluate the correlation between SDOH scores and HbA1c levels. Financial strain was the most prevalent positive screen among participants (77.3%), followed by stress (54.5%) and food insecurity (45.5%). Housing (22.7%) and transportation difficulties (18.2%) received fewer positive screens. Overall, higher scores on the SDOH survey were correlated with an increased HbA1c, indicating poorer glucose control. When individual factors were compared to HbA1c levels, higher levels of financial strain and stress were correlated to higher HbA1c measurements. Poor SDOH are an important factor involved in diabetic management, but further screening needs to be done to better understand the relationship between SDOH and patient outcomes. The quality improvement project is ongoing to continue to screen patients for SDOH. Next steps will be to develop tools for counseling patients with positive screenings and to determine if those tools can improve HbA1c scores.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Columbia Ballroom (CMCC upper level)
 Poster: 116

Benedict, Chelsea Kay, Jacob
Holloway, Jeff
Examination of Sex-based Differences and Adolescent Concussion Recovery
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Abstract Text

Aim/Purpose: Current literature indicates adolescent concussion outcomes may differ based on sex. More specifically, females often self-report greater number and severity of symptoms following concussion. However, evidence for sex-based differences on more objective measures of brain function remains incomplete. Therefore, the purpose of the present study was to go beyond self-reported symptoms and examine sex-based differences across cognitive, vestibular, and cardioautonomic functioning follow adolescent concussion. Methods: Sixty-two demographically matched adolescent females (n=31) and males (n=31) were evaluated at a pediatric specialty concussion clinic on average 2- and 4-weeks post-injury. To examine self-reported symptoms, patients completed the Rivermead Post Concussion Symptoms Questionnaire. A parent-reported Behavioral Rating Inventory of Executive Function was also assessed. Objective clinic measures of cognitive (CogState Brain Injury Battery), vestibular (Vestibular Oculomotor Screen-VOMS; Balance Error Scoring System-BESS), and cardioautonomic functioning were collected during each visit. Outcome variables were analyzed via series of 2 (group: female, male) x 2 (time: initial, follow-up visit) repeated measures ANOVAs. Independent samples t-tests with Bonferroni correction were used to determine to source of significant interactions. Results: On average, adolescent females self-reported a greater number and severity of somatic, affective, and cognitive symptoms across both evaluation timepoints (p’s ≤ 0.05) when compared to adolescent males. Similarly, parents of female patients reported observing greater levels executive dysfunction across both evaluation timepoints when compared to parents of male patients (p’s ≤ 0.05). Additionally, females had slower response times on the CogState OneBack Test (p

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Columbia Ballroom (CMCC upper level)
 Poster: 167

Williams, Jill Wilson, Dawn
Kipp, Colby
The Feasibility and Acceptability of a Family Resilience Intervention for Improving Health Outcomes in Overweight African American Adolescents
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Abstract Text

African American (AA) families are exposed to high levels of chronic stressors, suggesting that research is needed to better promote positive family coping and resilience to improve engagement in health promotion initiatives. Family resilience, defined as the capacity of the family unit to rebound and adapt following extreme stress and adversity, may be beneficial in buffering the negative impact of stress on health behaviors and outcomes. Previous research suggests that this strengths-based framework (i.e., family resilience) may be particularly relevant to AA families exposed to elevated chronic stress (e.g., racial discrimination) including improving psychosocial outcomes related to stress (e.g., psychological wellbeing, self-regulation). In addition, research has shown that, the capacity of a family system to effectively respond to stress and develop resilience can be reinforced by positive parenting styles and family practices. Thus, family coping skills are central for resilience and have been shown to increase youth self-regulation skills, family connectedness, and self-efficacy for effectively managing stressors. This study presents the feasibility and acceptability of a family resilience intervention for improving health outcomes (physical activity (PA), diet, and weight) A total of 16 families were randomized to either a 10-week online virtual family-based resilience intervention or an online virtual health education comparison program (adolescents: age = 14.60 ± 1.82; M BMI percentile = 97.0; 62.5% female; parents: age = 48.20 ± 9.87; BMI = 40.82 ± 6.84; 100% female). Feedback from participants in the intervention revealed high acceptability of intervention program elements, including the stress management components, the use of group PA goal setting, developing proactive coping skills, positive communication, and fostering family support (all values ranging from 3.5-4.5, on a 5-point scale). Finally, this feasibility study also involved setting group-based PA goals and using Fitbits to track daily PA. The Fitbit data showed that adolescents in the intervention maintained a higher average daily step count during the 10-week program (M = 6268.34 ± 2102.03) than adolescents in the comparison program (M = 5419.39 ± 2939.69). Overall, these finding suggest that a family resilience intervention was acceptable, feasible and associated with improvements in daily physical activity in overweight AA adolescents.

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 64

Witman, Virginia Kubickova, Marketa Flexibility is the Hallmark of a Career in Healthcare: A look into a Student’s Experience of Pursuing a Career in the Healthcare Professions
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Abstract Text

Since 2019, I have had the opportunity to work at Rockingham Family Physicians, a six-physician practice with twenty employees. During this time, I saw the radical impact of COVID-19 on a primary care medical office and the flexibility it required of the entire staff. My initial responsibilities in this position were as a medical receptionist and helping field upwards of 600 phone calls a day. Just as I was becoming comfortable with my responsibilities as a medical receptionist, the practice changed their medical software. This change in the electronic health record software necessitated me to learn to be more flexible. Shortly after the software conversion, COVID-19 impacted the entire world and had major implications on the practice of medicine in a primary care office. As my educational experience at the University of South Carolina progressed, I was transitioned into a nursing role with several of the physicians at the office. My opportunities and responsibilities expanded with this role change. As a result, I was able to convey medical results to patients, perform diagnostic testing, assist with procedures, and travel with physicians on home visits. The collection of opportunities and experiences I had at the family physician’s office has helped me in my capstone nursing practicum by providing me with experiences that were not part of the classroom curriculum. My presentation will discuss several insights into my growth as a leader through my time at the University of South Carolina and how these insights have cemented my decision to pursue a career in nursing.

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 189

Kothadia, Radhika Peters, Frank
Jones, Ashley
Incorporating Anti-Racism Education into Residency Training: A Pilot Project
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Abstract Text

Race-based and culture-based discrimination have long been a part of America’s history. Such discrimination has resulted in misdiagnosis, inequities in clinical treatment, and poorer health outcomes for minority populations. Recent events in our country and across the world have increased awareness of racism, and greater emphasis is being placed on anti-racism education and other efforts to address these issues. Anti-racism education has not been consistently incorporated into the general psychiatry residency training program curriculum at Prisma Health UofSC SOM Columbia. As such, it was crucial to initiate efforts to fill this gap in education and professional development. A short lecture series was integrated into the 2020-2021 resident curriculum, with pre- and post-lecture surveys administered to assess the effectiveness of the lectures. These surveys showed that this anti-racism curriculum enhanced resident understanding of the historical roots of racial disparities in psychiatry and resident comfort level with discussing race and diversity with patients, colleagues, and mentors.

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Columbia Ballroom (CMCC upper level)
 Poster: 116

Childs, Tasha Iachini, Aidyn Exploring Mental Health Supports during COVID-19 School Reopening: A Qualitative Study
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Abstract Text

COVID-19 forced school closures during Spring 2020. Then, over the summer, school districts began planning for school reopening with priorities not only around learning, but also health, safety, and well-being needs. It was unclear, however, the extent to which school district plans were responding to student mental health needs by directly describing mental health services and supports that would be offered. Little also was known about how School Social Workers (SSWs) delivery of mental health services and supports were impacted by COVID-19. Therefore, this study sought to answer: 1) Do school district reopening plans describe MH supports? And, if so, what types of MH supports are shared? 2) What are South Carolina (SC) SSWs perceptions of the types of MH supports offered and their experiences delivering these supports in their school(s)? School district reopening plans were collected from 67 SC school districts with publicly available reopening plans. Fifteen SSWs were recruited and interviewed during the Summer of 2021 to share their experiences delivering mental health supports to students during COVID-19. All analyses were conducted in MaxQDA as qualitative analysis software. About half of the school district reopening plans (n=31, 46%) described mental health supports for students. Though the plans described services across the tiered intervention framework (e.g., Tier I-III), most discussed prevention and early intervention services. SSWs reported engaging in several forms of mental health service delivery, such as check-ins with students, attendance and truancy interventions, crisis intervention, and suicide risk assessment. Barriers to service delivery included low engagement in virtual services, confidentiality and privacy issues, and lack of clarity in administrative guidance. Though virtual services were seen as a barrier, they also were viewed as a facilitator to reach students who remained at home during initial school reopening. Overall, this study found schools were overwhelmed with the student mental health need and simultaneous physical health concerns of reopening amid the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. Though prevention and early intervention for mental health were explicitly described in the reopening plans, SSWs provided critical insight into the ongoing efforts to provide targeted interventions for students experiencing truancy, crises, and suicidal ideation.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Columbia Ballroom (CMCC upper level)
 Poster: 9

Caudell, Chloe
Covil, Ethan
Kothari, Shanu “Correlation of marshmallow esophagram with high resolution manometry and clinical outcomes”
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Abstract Text

“Correlation of marshmallow esophagram with high resolution manometry and clinical outcomes” Chloe Caudell1, Ethan Covil1, Shanu Kothari1 1University of South Carolina School of Medicine Greenville, Prisma Health Upstate 1 Introduction: Esophageal motility is important in understanding candidacy for anti-reflux surgery. Traditionally, this has been performed with high-resolution manometry (HRM).1,3 HRM provides detailed analysis of esophageal motility and function. Unfortunately, it is performed with passage of a tube down the nares into the stomach, which some patients find quite intolerable. In 2019, Prisma introduced a screening test for motility which involves a marshmallow swallow with radiographic visualization. Purpose: To evaluate the accuracy of using the minimally invasive marshmallow esophagram as a preoperative screening technique for patients. Aim 1: Correlate marshmallow study results with HRM results. Aim 2: Correlate marshmallow study results with postoperative dysphagia and surgery outcomes. Materials and Methods: A retrospective chart review of data on 100 adult patients (>18 years of age) who underwent marshmallow swallow studies at Prisma Health-Upstate from June 1, 2020 through May 1, 2021 was completed. Data abstraction and analysis focused on patient data routinely collected and documented in the Prisma Health electronic health record (HER) system (EPIC). Results: Pending Analysis. Hypothesis 1: Marshmallow esophagram results will be correlated with HRM results. Hypothesis 2: Marshmallow esophagram results will be correlated with post-operative dysphagia. Conclusions: If results demonstrate the marshmallow study correlates with outcomes of HRM, we would be able to recommend this Marshmallow screening technique in place of HRM. Marshmallow study would then be able to serve as an accurate and minimally invasive screen, improving the comfort level of patient care when assessing candidacy for antireflux surgery.

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Columbia Ballroom (CMCC upper level)
 Poster: 83

Gambardella, Kristen Harrison, Sayward A Systematic Review of Human Papillomavirus and Vaccination Perception, Awareness, and Knowledge and Associated Characteristics of Individuals in North and South Carolina
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Abstract Text

Human Papillomavirus (HPV) is a relatively common viral infection, with approximately 14 million Americans becoming newly infected per year (CDC). HPV is spread through sexual contact, and although most HPV strains or ‘types’ are low-risk and innocuous, high-risk types of HPV cause cancer (CDC). Fortunately, vaccination against HPV is highly effective, safe, and widely available to the US public (CDC). Concerningly, HPV vaccination rates have not paralleled those of other adolescent vaccines (e.g., tetanus, diphtheria, pertussis [Tdap]), and the state of South Carolina has particularly low rates of HPV vaccination (SCDHEC). With this in mind, it is important to investigate the ‘state of the science’ in terms of individuals’ awareness, knowledge, and attitudes of HPV and HPV vaccination in North and South Carolina and to identify possible socio-demographic disparities (such as age, gender, race, ethnicity, rural-urban status). This will be investigated through a systematic review. Articles have been included based on specific criteria, and data will be extracted in order to synthesize these results. These findings will be presented at Discover USC.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 59

Covil, Ethan
Caudell, Chloe
Kothari, Shanu Appendectomy resource utilization: Does it correlate with severity of disease
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Abstract Text

Introduction: Acute appendicitis is one of the most common emergent surgical procedures performed in the world. There are varying degrees of presentation, ranging from mild appendicitis to gangrenous appendicitis with perforation. Most appendectomies are now performed laparoscopically, but the technique and utilization of instrumentation varies between surgeons. With this variation comes variations in direct cost to the healthcare institution. Purpose: The goal of this study is to investigate whether the resource utilization costs associated with laparoscopic appendectomies correlate with the severity of appendicitis based on pathologic findings. Methods: The electronic health record of our academic center covering 6 hospitals was queried for all laparoscopic appendectomies performed from January 1, 2020 through December 31, 2020. A retrospective chart review was completed, searching for patient demographics, comorbidities, operative time, perioperative and postoperative complications, and pathology reports for the disease state of the removed appendix. In addition, direct supply costs of each procedure were obtained. ANOVA and Kruskal-Wallis tests were performed between perioperative supply costs of each disease state against one another. Results: In total, 549 patients were reviewed from six hospitals. ANOVA comparison between the supply costs of the various disease states showed a significant difference between groups (p=0.032). Kruskal-Wallis analysis reported similar findings (p=0.041). The mean supply costs for appendixes deemed to be normal was $862 ± 215, acute non-suppurative was $893 ± 233, acute suppurative $912 ± 176, acute gangrenous $921 ± 176, and perforated $1032 ± 308. Conclusions: Direct supply costs of the laparoscopic appendectomy were different for varying degrees of appendicitis. However, these cost differences were not linear, meaning that efforts can be made to standardize the direct supply cost of laparoscopic appendectomies performed within our institution. These efforts could culminate in a standardized preference card tailored specifically for laparoscopic appendectomy.

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Columbia Ballroom (CMCC upper level)
 Poster: 138

Rivers, Genna Dail, Robin
Pou, Jay
Kangaroo Mother Care: What Studying Mothers and Infants Taught Me About the Research Process
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Abstract Text

Background: As a nursing student in the Honors College, I completed my senior thesis project on the experience of adolescent mothers in carrying out kangaroo mother care with their infants. I felt passionate about this subject due to the high rate of adolescent pregnancy in my rural hometown. I spent about 2 hours per week on this project over the Fall 2020, Spring 2021, and Fall 2021 semesters with Dr. Robin Dail as my mentor. Activity: To carry out my scoping review, I first searched the PubMed and CINAHL databases. I then conducted a title screening, abstract screening, and read 21 full-text articles, eventually including 7 for synthesis and review. I then synthesized the results using thematic analysis. I worked alongside my mentor, Dr. Robin Dail, my second reader, Dr. Robin Dawson, and received help from a UofSC librarian. Despite my discouragement at times as a new researcher, my mentors never failed to encourage me to move forward. Reflection: Scoping reviews are meant to create a picture of the breadth and depth of the literature on a particular topic, rather than yield implications for practice. I delved into an area that had a very sparse base of literature, and I felt discouraged when I did not yield many concrete answers to my research question. I felt nervous as I prepared for my thesis defense and reflected on my project. I felt my research was far from groundbreaking. However, I reflected back to my within-the-classroom learning about the failure of the long-standing theories in chemistry, as well as how nursing interventions change over time as new discoveries are made. I soon realized that sometimes there simply are no answers yet, and that is the beauty of research. I may not have yielded explicit answers or implications for practice, but I did create a guide as to where research is needed. I now realize there is no end-game in research, and we should treat theories as open to new discovery. I also hope to continue to learn more about this topic through interventional studies in a master’s or doctoral project.

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 33

Jacobin, Meagan Pou, Jay You Can’t Spell Leadership Without AED: Mentoring Pre-Physical Therapy Students
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Abstract Text

Amid my junior year, I was urged by a close friend to apply to Alpha Epsilon Delta (AED) the day that the application was due. With nothing to lose, I applied, received an interview, and was accepted into the prestigious organization. Eager to become involved, I applied to be on the cabinet as the Doctor of Physical Therapy Mentorship Program (DPTMP) Director. I was previously a member of this mentorship program because AED had extended this program to the pre-physical therapy students within the Exercise Science Club. Having received the opportunity to be mentored by a current physical therapy student as I was applying to physical therapy school was by far, one of the most meaningful experiences throughout my undergraduate career. I wanted to serve as the DPTMP Director to offer other pre-physical therapy students the opportunity to receive insightful advice from a mentor as well as provide them with significant events pertaining to the field of physical therapy. As the DPTMP Director, I learned what it was like to serve as a mentor for the members who may feel lost and ill prepared along their pre-physical therapy journey. This experience has been meaningful to me because I have not only learned from the mentors in the program but also the mentees who are approaching their pre-physical therapy path differently than I have. I want other pre-physical therapy AED members to understand how impactful this mentorship program is and what all that there is to gain from having a mentor. As a prospective physical therapy student, I hope to be accepted into a graduate program where I can apply for leadership positions that are similar to the DPTMP Director so that I can grow not only as a student but as a person.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 168

Hines, Morgan Pou, Jay The Application of Blood Flow Restriction: Lessons From My Time at Prisma Health
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Maintaining physical activity is very important for skeletal muscle health. One form of physical activity is resistance training. Generally speaking, one needs to lift weights at approximately 70% of their one repetition maximum to have noticeable increases in muscle size and strength. Some populations (elderly, rehabilitating patients, etc.) might not be able to perform resistance training to this capacity and have to find other alternatives. Blood flow restriction by itself or in combination with exercise has been shown to produce beneficial adaptations to skeletal muscle. This technique is shown to attenuate atrophy of a muscle and when combined with low intensity exercise, can result in an increase in muscle size and strength. These adaptations have been observed throughout my time at Prisma Health Orthopedic Rehabilitation clinic across a wide range of populations such as athletes and older adults. The purpose of this presentation is to provide an overview of the evidence-based practice for how to use blood flow restriction in an outpatient setting. Just about anyone can benefit from blood flow restriction training as it provides improvements in muscle strength, soft tissue health, and extra stability to support body movements and posture. Blood flow restriction serves as an effective treatment in a clinical setting.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 44

Tamanna, Nowrin Murillo, Crystal L. Simulation and social determinants of health (SDOH) in nursing education: An integrative review
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Background: Experiential learning is a vital component to prepare the future nursing workforce to apply their understanding of the SDOH and to develop SDOH specific advocacy skills. In nursing education, the focus on SDOH is conceptual with the approach that SDOH are facts to be known rather than conditions to be challenged. While nurses alone are not sufficient to tackle SDOH, to be truly effective, nurses need to be appropriately educated about SDOH including having requisite knowledge and tools to understand and advocate for reducing the impact of SDH on health outcomes. There is a paucity of research demonstrating how nursing faculty use experiential learning to embed SDOH content into a patient specific context for students to view themselves as transformative social justice change agents. With only a conceptual understanding, the emerging workforce may be ill prepared to address SDOH; assist patients to make the choices that lead to good health; and appreciate the impact of SDOH on health, social justice, and health equity. Purpose: The aim of this integrative review is to present a state of the science demonstrating how simulation is used to incorporate SDOH knowledge into a patient-specific context and to identify if the simulation experiences measured SDOH knowledge or transformation of student perspective related to participation in the experience. Methods: This review follows Whittmore and Knafl's step by step method of conducting integrative reviews. 54 studies met inclusion criteria specific to the SDOH and are included in this review. Results: Of the 54 studies, authors identified simulation experiences from all five SDOH categories. Only one study measured knowledge specific to SDOH. Forty-four studies measured an aspect of advocacy/perspective transformation. Conclusion and Implications: Results of this review identify clear gaps and over and under representations using simulation to teach SDOH. An additional noteworthy finding includes no social support networks mentioned in any of the studies. Based on results, authors suggest that SDOH related training be experiential, with seamless integration of SDOH as both a content area and health equity advocacy as a skill.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Columbia Ballroom (CMCC upper level)
 Poster: 51

Andrews, Taya DeWeil, David Student Affairs and Career Services: The Impact and Shaping Effect They Have on Student Success
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As I entered into my junior year at the University of South Carolina, I wanted to be employed at the university to gain on-campus experience, potentially network, and most importantly, as a valuable asset to my professional development. This led to my being hired as a Career Studio Peer Educator (CSPE) in the UofSC Career Center. Within my role, I handle many receptionist and administrative duties, but the most important aspect of the CSPE role is the appointments we have with students. From discussing major changes and career paths to professional document review and interview preparation, the students in the Career Studio were always available to assist students in any way that we could. This position was the most influential part of my entire time as a college student, not just because of the professional development I gained, but also because of the impact it had on my career path. The interactions I got to have with students in my appointments and professional staff members I worked with helped me realize that I wanted to go into the student affairs field where I could continue to have an impact on students lives every day. Due to my time working in the Career Center and as a student employee, I can proudly say that I have found a career path that makes me feel rewarded and confident. After graduation, I will be headed towards a graduate degree — and soon after a career — in student affairs, which I attribute entirely to my time as a Career Studio Peer Educator.

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 202

Campman, Mikaela Reinhardt, Sara Life Lessons of the Service Industry
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Since I was 14 years old, I have worked in the restaurant industry in order to assist my parents with bills and pay my way through college. Over summers and breaks of my college career, I worked as a head server at Snooky’s Oceanfront in Cherry Grove. On top of typical serving goals, I was tasked with training new employees and ensuring all others on shift completed the tasks necessary to get through the shift. Whenever a more difficult task or errand arose, my general manager often selected me to carry it out as I have worked for her for seven years now and have established myself as a dependable employee. Though I knew I had always been a solid server, in such a position, I found I was one of the top servers and highest sellers as well as one management felt comfortable trusting. Though serving is not the career I want to pursue permanently, working in restaurants has taught me many life skills I believe are hard to find elsewhere. When it comes to working in restaurants, you are faced with the difficulty of ensuring the best dining experience for every guest, which, difficult in its own right, is made even more complicated during the busy tourism season of the Grand Strand. Through my years of experience, I have learned how to manage my time properly, organize my serving book in a manner that is most efficient for me, and remain outwardly calm to my tables no matter how busy I truly am, de-escalating situations that often become overwhelming to others. This skill development has allowed me to establish a system where nine times out of ten, the guests who have dined with me leave happy. On top of others, I have found these life skills are easily applicable to the world of my desired career path as time management, organization, and de-escalation are all helpful in any situation. Thanks to my serving experience, I am confident in my ability to complete the job no matter what position I am in and maintain a leadership role.

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 232

Hardin, Blakely Pou, Jay Freshman Council: The First Freshman Voice
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Freshman Council is part of Student Government made of 35 first-year students and housed within the Student Body Vice President’s department. It was founded to give a voice to freshman students who are not present when spring elections take place. Now, the Council is divided into four or five committees, depending on the year, that focus on major aspects of campus life, like Academics or Student Life. Freshmen also improve their leadership abilities and complete professional development training. The Council serves to give voices to the voiceless, from incoming freshmen to underrepresented groups. During my term, I was a member of the Health and Safety Committee. We planned events, like Glow Zumba, and worked to better understand concerns about campus wellness. I was also elected by my Freshman Council peers to lead our council’s “Legacy Project,” which is the lasting record of each council to represent their year. This is the most impactful component of my Freshman Council experience. For this project, I led a team of four council members in completing research on the history of the council and Student Government more broadly, focusing on the importance of diversity and inclusion. We struggled to find the right university department to help us bring our display of research findings to life with an informative, fun visual for students, faculty, staff, and visitors alike to appreciate as they learned more about what Freshman Council stands for. After six months of research and meetings with various departments, the Director of Russell House, Kim McMahon, offered our team the opportunity to display our work in the student union. She gave us the chance to design new posters for the eight panels surrounding the portraits of the Russell’s on the second floor. The legacy project gave me an appreciation for the history of Freshman Council. It helped me connect my on-campus work with DEI with research on DEIA teaching methods. I was able to see relationships between my campus advocacy work and internships, like my Mayor’s Fellows experience with the City of Columbia and my SC Senate Judiciary Committee internship program.

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 210

Dirr, Kaitlyn Stone, Joshua
Kimball, Matthew E.
Seasonal Use of Gopher Tortoise Burrows in Coastal Beach Dunes
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Gopher tortoises (Gopherus polyphemus), the only land tortoises native to the southeastern United States, are considered a keystone species in coastal plain habitats such as longleaf pine forests, which is where nearly all research on this species has focused. Gopher tortoises construct extensive burrows which are also used by other animals (e.g., mice, snakes, birds, insects) for food and shelter. In contrast to coastal plain habitats, relatively few studies have focused on tortoise ecology in coastal beach dune habitats, and none have examined seasonal burrow use by gopher tortoises or other animals in beach dunes. The Guana-Tolomato-Matanzas National Estuarine Research Reserve (GTM NERR) located in St. Augustine, Florida, along the northeast Florida Atlantic coast, has a 6.5 km stretch of undeveloped coastline within its boundaries. This undeveloped beach dune habitat offers a unique chance to examine gopher tortoise ecology in a relatively undisturbed (anthropogenically, at least) beach dune setting. The objectives of this project were to use videos recorded at the entrance of 10 GTM NERR gopher tortoise burrows over one entire year (2011-2012) to 1) determine seasonal (winter, spring, summer, and fall) and diel (time of day) behavioral patterns of gopher tortoises in and around burrows, and 2) to identify and document burrow use patterns by other animals in this beach dune habitat. Approximately 41,496 30-second video clips were collected with motion-activated field cameras positioned directly in front of and to the side of observed burrow entrances. Throughout the year we observed a variety of gopher tortoise behaviors (e.g., mating, foraging) at the burrows, and observed numerous other animals at the burrows during both day and night (e.g., opossums, bobcats, doves, armadillos, lizards). The results of this study shed light into the use and importance of gopher tortoise burrows in coastal beach dunes, a habitat where this species’ contribution is vastly understudied.

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 121

Dearborn, Amanda Grewe, Maureen Self-Discovery Through Cultural Experiences
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During my sophomore year spring break, Spring 2020, I had the opportunity to go on a medical mission trip and gain hands-on medical experience by providing care to impoverished communities in rural Guatemala. Before going on the medical mission trip to Guatemala, what I valued in life were things that I had rarely come across. After coming back, I no longer took everyday occurrences for granted. This trip truly opened my eyes in many ways. My value-based development was greatly enhanced on this trip because I was in a new culture and society where their value system is extremely different from America’s. In America, we tend to place more value on bigger and better store-bought items, whereas in Guatemala, people place a high value on freshwater, better living conditions, and their health. This helped me develop myself more as a person and taught me to not take everyday commodities for granted. Not many college students can say that they were able to experience a culture that highly values the very things we take for granted. Getting to see actual patients and interact with them was a highlight of this trip. By going on this trip, I got a small glimpse of what I hope my future will be like. I have always had hopes of one day becoming a doctor and this truly opened my eyes to see how amazing the field is. I never had a true understanding of just how great and life-changing someone in this field could be.

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 160

Conway, Molly Qian, Yu Particle Migration in Railroad Ballast
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In the fall of 2020, I began participating in an on-going research project investigating geotechnical railway issues. Specifically, I researched small particle migration. The project was primarily driven by the question: what is the minimum portion size of a railroad aggregate shoulder that must be cleaned to allow the rest of the fines to migrate out under seepage? This is significant because cleaning the railway aggregate causes rail closures, consumes time, wastes laborers, and costs lots of money. Currently, it is proven that eventually, the fines can migrate out progressively, and if a certain portion of the fines can be cleaned out, that opens the drainage paths. Unfortunately, there is very little research on how much to clean. Understanding this will improve transportation logistics, labor efficiency, and overall costs by eliminating the need for cleaning closures. Therefore, in the experiment, we simulated repeated rainfall conditions on a cross-section of railroad ballast. Half of the section was fully fouled, and the other half was cleaned by a certain maintenance method. Fouled ballast means that the rocks contain lots of small particles such as sand or clay, whereas clean ballast is solely rocks. By monitoring the movement of fine particles from the fouled ballast section through the cleaned ballast section, the changing interface could be studied. To do this, we set up three cameras to record the trials and took pictures at specific times throughout the six-hour trial run time. Then, my mentor watched the video footage while I interpreted the pictures. Using this data, we made a graph to display how the interface between the “clean” section and “fouled” section changed over the rainfall time. Because this research is currently in progress, specific results cannot be discussed or published, but overall, the interface shifted from a mild downhill slope to a ridged cliff-like edge. Unfortunately, the inner-most fouled area did not self-clean to the degree hypothesized, so more experiments are being conducted to achieve the self-cleaning standard.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 141

Lamb, Lilian Epps, Lauren Leadership as a Younion Resident Mentor
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This year, I plan on discussing my experience as a RM at Younion as part of your Graduation with Leadership Distinction: Professional and Civic Engagement pathway requirements. The resident mentor experience is different for everyone, but especially so when you work at a building that operates differently from the rest of campus. During the 2021-2022 academic school year, I acted as a resident mentor for Younion. Younion is very different from other buildings since Younion has a leasing department and maintenance team separate from the university. As resident mentors, we often had to refer our residents to the leasing office for all their questions and maintenance concerns. Being a new resident mentor, I often was unsure or felt like I was not providing what my residents needed. While my experience working as a resident mentor was different than others in different buildings, the experience was just as enriching and educational. Being a resident mentor has shown me a different side of university housing and given me experiences I would not have gained otherwise. I gained confidence when dealing with situations that required quick thinking. I also gained conflict management skills as I helped residents work through roommate conflicts. As part of the job, I developed and organized resident events to facilitate community and companionship within Younion. The development of events required collaboration among peers and my supervisor to develop purchasing orders, marketing, and the physical execution of the event. The job gave me great insight into what to expect when I join the workforce after graduation and many other crucial life skills. Having the resident mentor job while taking 17/18 credit hours has not been an easy task; however, I would not trade the experiences I have earned through the job for anything. For the 2022-2023 academic year, I plan to continue my role as a resident mentor and continue to gain leadership experience.

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 205

String, Tyler Pou, Jay Healthcare in Mexico: Growing my Pre-Professional Health Horizons to Serving Abroad
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In May of 2021, I had the tremendous opportunity through my pre-health honor society, Alpha Epsilon Delta, to serve on a medical mission trip to Puerto Penasco, Mexico. I, along with twenty other incredible AED members, were able to allocate a sense of physical healthcare to the patrons of the local community through daily home visits, serving at the local clinic, and organizing a two-day clinic at the local church. The largest discrepancy in the Mexican healthcare system is the lack of quality and access of physical resources. The government essentially dictates where resources are allocated, as well as the level of care provided. Our purpose of serving on this trip was to give the local people the care that was desperately needed. Some have been ill for years, with poor hygiene and malnutrition, others with young children who battle with parasitic and fungal infections. By actively splitting up into groups each day and carrying out successful home visits and spreading the message of our “pop-up” clinic at the church later in the week, we were able to serve over a hundred patrons. All of the volunteers from AED, the translators, the local volunteers, the pharmacists, and the physicians together were able to collaborate and prescribe free medications for those who needed it. Another gross aspect of our purpose was to spread the importance and education of health and well-being. A majority of the folks that we saw and treated, were never educated on hygiene or nutrition. It was incredible the amount of reach that we had in the community and how many grateful people we were able to serve. It was truly a humbling, eye-opening experience that I will cherish forever and carry with me as I aspire to become a preventative medicine physician.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 187

Derry, Harlan Spence, Gina School-Based Interventions for Children and Adolescents to Reduce Childhood Obesity in Rural South Carolina
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As an exercise science major, I have been taught that physical activity has a profound impact on a person’s health. I am also minoring in medical humanities and culture, which has exposed me to concepts including health care disparities and the social determinants of health. For the past year, I have been able to serve as a research assistant with the Connect lab. The current study being conducted is an intervention study aimed at reducing levels of childhood obesity in rural and underserved communities. I decided to partake in this opportunity because I have a passion for health and wellness and I saw this as a way to share that passion with others while also improving the health of the communities that surround me. As a research assistant with the intervention team, I have been able to combine the knowledge that I have gained through my major and minor and apply it to the real world. My role is to go to after-school programs at elementary and middle schools in rural communities and lead physical activities and games. Our hope is that we can help kids reach the exercise recommendations that were set by the World Health Organization, which were created for children to be at optimal health, and facilitate friendships between all the kids. This will hopefully reduce the heightened levels of obesity in those communities, which is linked to many chronic diseases such as hypertension and diabetes. This in turn should improve the health outcomes for all of the children involved. This experience has ultimately shown me that to fix a problem, it takes immersing yourself in the community first, and then implementing the plan that you come up with. As an aspiring physician, I look forward to serving in a rural community and applying the things I have learned to ensure that people in this area receive the care that they deserve.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 195

Lacera, Zara Hancock, C. Nathan
Redd, Priscilla
Characterizing the Genes Affecting mPing Transposition in Yeast
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Transposable elements (TEs) are segments of DNA that “jump” to different locations in an organism’s genome. TEs are important because they can cause mutations which result in genetic diversity and facilitate evolution. We study the transposition behavior of an active TE from rice called mPing. To identify genes that affect mPing transposition, we screened a yeast overexpression genomic library and found clones that altered transposition rates. By performing a growth curve, we eliminated clones with altered growth. Sequencing our top candidates allowed us to identify the genes present in each clone. From these results, we eliminated a clone from further study because it had no testable genes in the genomic region it contained. However, we found that the E27 clone contained the gene STB3, which could be responsible for its high transposition rate. We also became interested in the HCH1 gene from the 1B-F11 clone, which is a heat shock protein involved in protein folding. We made overexpression constructs and ordered yeast knockout strains for these genes to directly measure how they affect mPing transposition. Based on our screen, we anticipate that overexpression of these genes will increase transposition, while removing the genes will decrease transposition. Knowing the effects of these genes on transposition is important because it helps us understand how organisms regulate TE activity.

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 92

Tatro, Cecelia DeWeil, David Supporting Student's in their Unique First-Year Experience
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My first-year experience was lonely and challenging. Moving forward in my college journey, I wanted to support future first-year students and normalize the less glamourous parts of the experience. Serving as a University 101 (U101) Peer Leader seemed like a great way to do that. U101 is the first-year experience course meant to foster student success and discovery. As a peer leader, I facilitated classes, cotaught with an exploratory advisor, and created assignments for student reflection. I taught an exploratory section, so our mission was to create a space that encouraged exploration of values, strengths, and career interests. I had to pull from my own strengths to mentor and support my students. Thankful for the mentors who invested in my growth, it only made sense to me that I would pour that same energy into my students. During my experience, I learned to reflect on my student's needs, how to coach them in their strengths, and how to create a community safe for self-exploration. My time as a U101 peer leader has shown me what it means to support students both in and beyond the classroom. As I pursue a career in Student Affairs and Higher Education, I look forward to continuing the conversation at other institutions on what I learned during my time as a University 101 Peer Leader.

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 177

Fisher, Kirsten Stratmann, Johannes Signaling Responses of Tomato Plants and Cells to the Green Leaf Volatile cis-3-hexenol
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As organisms that are rooted in place and lack a nervous system, how do plants ‘know’ and ‘communicate’ with other plants when they are under attack? Upon damage plants release a class of six-carbon compounds containing either an alcohol, aldehyde, or ester functional group known as green leaf volatiles (GLVs). GLVs function as alarm signals, warning undamaged tissue of the emitting plant or neighboring receiver plants of potential danger. These uninjured plant tissues then upregulate their defenses in preparation for an attack. While it is well known that GLVs make plants more resistant to attackers such as herbivores, it is not known how plants perceive GLVs and translate this perception into a defense response. Many other wound-related signals are perceived by pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) in the cell membrane which induce defenses via cellular signaling networks. Components of this network include extracellular pH changes, Ca2+ fluxes, generation of reactive oxygen species, activation of mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPKs), and rapid phosphorylation of various signaling proteins that all lead to the production of defense proteins like proteinase inhibitors (PIs). Since GLVs are released in response to wounding and induce defenses, we hypothesize that GLVs are also recognized by PRRs. To test this we measured the early signaling response of tomato plants and cells to the GLV cis-3-hexenol. We found that cis-3-hexenol induced a pH response, MAPK activation, and changes to the phosphoproteome in SP cells. These results are consistent with the idea that cis-3-hexenol and potentially other GLV signaling is initiated by PRRs. Cis-3-hexenol is a small organic compound, and it is unknown whether the entire molecule, the alcohol, or the hydrocarbon tail interact with and activate a putative receptor protein. We performed a structure function analysis to determine if the hydrophobic tail of cis-3-hexenol is what confers its specificity for a receptor by measuring the signaling and defense responses of cis-3-alcohols with different tail lengths (C4, 6, 7, 8, 9). Deciphering the chemical language of GLVs has many implications for sustainable agriculture and the decreased use of traditional agrochemicals.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 111

Milne, Brianna Wellman, Denise The Free Medical Clinic
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The Free Medical Clinic is a primary care clinic in Columbia, SC that provides care to the uninsured population that falls below the national poverty line. As a clinical volunteer there, I perform patient intake and discharge, as well as assisting with basic procedures and patient education. Since I plan to go to school to become a Physician Assistant, these direct interactions with patients and providers will help me be a better provider in the future. After starting to volunteer at the clinic, I quickly realized I would be gaining much more than just professional experience. After seeing the way that our healthcare system has failed so many deserving people I am determined to help change it and provide care to those in need. As a future healthcare provider, this experience has been fundamental in confirming my career decision and inspiring me to continue the work of the Free Medical Clinic.

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 182

Renken, Kaili Hancock, C. Nathan Investigating the Role of RNA Polymerase V in mPing Excision Site Repair
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Recent studies indicate that RNA plays a role in Eukaryotic DNA repair. The plant specific RNA Polymerase V (PolV) is mostly known for its role in gene silencing through the RNA-directed DNA methylation pathway, but it has also been proposed to aid in repair of double stranded DNA breaks (DSBs). Excision of DNA transposons creates DSBs, but little is known about PolV’s role in repair of these sites. The transposable element, mPing, is an active miniature inverted transposable element derived from the autonomous Ping element that can be induced to transpose in Arabidopsis. The purpose of this project is to test if the PolV protein is required for mPing excision site repair. We measured mPing transposition by screening for GFP (green fluorescence protein) expression from an mPing:GFP reporter. GFP is only expressed when mPing excision has occurred and the resulting DSB is repaired. To answer this question, we tested four Arabidopsis mutants with altered methylation: ddm1-2, pol4, polV, and met1. We transformed each with a T-DNA construct that contains the mPing:GFP reporter and the gene constructs needed for mPing mobilization. We then used fluorescence microscopy to screen the transgenic plants for GFP and performed an excision site analysis. The results suggested that plants missing RNA PoV show less GFP expression and plants missing RNA Polymerase IV, Ddm1, and Met1 proteins have normal mPing transposition and DNA repair. PCR analysis of polV plants suggests that PolV isn’t required for mPing excision, but the excision sites are repaired less precisely.

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 103

Azevedo, Rachel Blackburn, Melanie The pediatric obesity pandemic: Improving screening and documentation on resident services in the inpatient setting
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The rates of pediatric obesity in the United States are at an all-time high with nearly 10% of infants and toddlers and nearly 17% of children and teenagers classified as overweight or obese. Not only does this have long-lasting physical and mental impacts on our youths, but pediatric obesity has also been associated with continued obesity as an adult. As such, our objective is to address the rising rate of obesity in the local population by improving screening during inpatient encounters with the hope of improving healthy lifestyle interventions. To do so, two separate interventions were implemented that were based on educating residents and reminding residents about documenting obesity with pre-made auto-texts and providing educational obesity pamphlets to families. During Intervention One, residents received weekly verbal reminders. During Intervention Two, residents received daily verbal reminders for two weeks, and then weekly verbal reminders on Monday morning of the final two weeks. During the pre-intervention period, only 12.2% of overweight or obese patients had this included as a diagnosis. After Intervention One, the percentage of documented weight-related diagnoses increased to 41%. Increased reminders during Intervention Two increased this percentage documented to 48%. However, despite improved documentation, increase in frequency of reminders to document did not lead to a significant increase in education and healthy lifestyle interventions that was documented during these encounters. Ultimately, this study suggests that residents can use QI methods to improve the quality of obesity screening in the inpatient setting. Future endeavors focusing on pairing documentation with subsequent lifestyle interventions will allow for the true complexity of the patient's care to be fully encapsulated and result in better quality of care for the patient.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Columbia Ballroom (CMCC upper level)
 Poster: 130

Averill, Catherine Epps, Lauren Home Run in Partnerships
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In summer 2019, I worked with the Atlanta Braves Baseball Club as an intern in the Corporate Partnerships department. The Corporate Partnerships department works with sponsors to create contracts that promote brands throughout the stadium as well as in game activations. That is only one side to the partnership, the other is hospitality. Hospitality includes getting to know the clients, making sure they have the best experience possible, and making them feel valued as a partner. As a marketing major at the University of South Carolina, my internship provided me with real world experience in brand promotion and client care. I had the opportunity to create promotionals to announce the launch of the All Star Game, fully understand the importance of aesthetic and placements of promotional signage throughout the stadium, and learn the ropes of client hospitality. Specifically, I built relationships with the clients as well as created promotional signage that would get baseball fans excited for the All Star Game to be held in Atlanta. This internship confirmed that I wanted to pursue a career in both marketing and hospitality. This experience has given me hands-on experience that will prepare me for a full time job in marketing after graduating in May.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 171

Hickey, Kaitlyn Cannella, Alyssa Guiding Gamecocks Home
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University Ambassadors has been the foundation of my Carolina experience. University Ambassadors has provided me the tools through personal and professional opportunities to embrace my Carolina journey with collaboration, confidence, and passion. Through University Ambassadors, we are the first face that prospective Gamecocks engage with. Welcoming and inspiring the next generation of Gamecock students has been one of my greatest joys; however, collaborating with my peers and learning from our differences has developed me into the person I am today. I have learned to engage with multiple audiences, interact with a diverse group of people, and the importance of collaboration at all levels of leadership. I believe the reason that we are successful as an organization is because of the community that we build from one another. Reflecting internally and providing externally, our love, spirit, and welcoming nature captivates our future Gamecocks. Mentorship is the core of how we build our community. Creating, crafting, and exhibiting tour stops, engaging relationships, and enhancing a sense of belonging across the Carolina campus is of utmost importance to us. Through my DiscoverUSC presentation, I hope to share the insights I have learned about leadership and mentorship and share my story with one of the most pivotal organizations on campus.

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 199

Wu, Xuanke Chen, Yuche Association between Perceived Transportation Disadvantages and Opportunity Inaccessibility: A Social Equity Study
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This study presents empirical evidence for the associations between perceived transportation disadvantages and opportunity inaccessibility. Based on an online survey with a representative sample in South Carolina, we identify three latent factors of perceived transportation disadvantages, i.e., high travel costs, limited travel ability, and safety concerns. We also construct the factor of the perceived opportunity inaccessibility to various essential opportunities. By estimating a structural equation model, we found that opportunity inaccessibility is positively associated with perceived transportation disadvantages such as high travel costs and limited travel ability. The factor of safety concerns does not directly affect inaccessibility but has positive covariance with the factors of high costs and limited ability. Perceived inaccessibility is distributed inequitably across population groups (e.g., race and age) and associated with the built environment. The paper provides insights into the multidimensional interrelationships between the perception-based factors of disadvantages and inaccessibility from a new perspective and discusses the policy implications for improving transportation equity.

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Columbia Ballroom (CMCC upper level)
 Poster: 10

WANG, ZIXIN Wang, Hui Size-Dependent Multimodal Catalytic Behaviors of Polydopamine Supported Pt Nanocatalysts
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Noble metal nanoparticles exhibit intriguing size-dependent catalytic activities toward a plethora of important chemical reactions. A particularly interesting but rarely explored scenario is that some catalytic molecule-transforming processes may even inter-switch among multiple reaction pathways when the dimensions of a metal nanocatalyst are deliberately tuned within specific size windows. Here, we take full advantage of the adhesive surface properties of polydopamine to kinetically maneuver the surface-mediated nucleation and growth of Pt nanocrystals, which enables us to synthesize polydopamine-supported sub-5 nm Pt nanocatalysts with precisely tunable particle sizes, narrow size distributions, ligand-free clean surfaces, and uniform dispersion over the support surfaces. As exemplified by Pt-catalyzed nitrophenol reduction by ammonia borane, catalytic transfer hydrogenation reactions may inter-switch between two fundamentally distinct bimolecular reaction pathways, specifically the Langmuir-Hinshelwood and the Eley-Rideal mechanisms, as the size of the Pt nanocatalysts varies in the sub-5 nm regime.

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Pastides Alumni Center Ballroom 1b
Time: 1:15 

Ballou, Julia Ismail, Briahnna More than people skills: How effective use of individual and group communication skills improved my leadership
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Communication skills can seem like something professionals slap on paper to appear more capable, prepared, and talented. However, through my time at University of South Carolina serving as both an organization leader and a peer leader, I learned the importance of developing both individual and group communication skills. Within the classroom, I learned important skills in group communication and individual communication and had the opportunity to practice a few times throughout the semester. However, my leadership positions outside of the classroom proved even more valuable- I used and practiced these communication skills in real life experiences through addressing the organization I lead, the Carolina Clemson Blood Drive, and in both class facilitation and one on one meetings as a University 101 peer leader and senior peer leader. My success in my leadership roles can be directly attributed to the communication skills I learned in the classroom and my ability to apply it to my everyday life. My presentation will discuss the communication skills I learned and applied and how they are more than just people skills- they make a difference in leadership.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 223

Dengler, Emily DeWeil, David My journey in becoming an effective servant leader
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As a Public Health major at the University of South Carolina, many people ask me why I am involved in Student Government. However, I believe that my role as Student Body Vice President (SBVP) has been the part of college that has prepared me the most to be a future Dentist. As SBVP I oversaw and organized Student Government’s programs and I served on a multitude of university committees. I decided to run for SBVP to grow as a leader and to help make positive changes on our campus. Throughout my time in the position, I have learned how to be an effective leader and a servant leader. My presentation will dive deep into what I learned about myself and leadership so that others can also grow from my experience. It is these skills that I will take with me into my future career as a dentist to lead my team, my patients, and my community.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 199

Leatherman, Gracie DeWeil, David Professional and Civic Engagement in Environmental Practices
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Abstract Text

Throughout my time at the University of South Carolina, I have been able to learn about environmental practices and gain an understanding with how geography impacts people's understanding of their environment. Part of the connection between people understanding their environment comes from how agencies treat the environment. Leaders in government agencies have the authority to protect the environment through sustainable environmental practices. There are multiple steps needed to successfully conduct environmental practices as federal and state regulations must be followed. My time as an intern with the Davidson Soil and Water Conservation District office brought insight on how an environmental restoration project is implemented. Another experience that I was able to partake in includes witnessing a controlled burn. After learning about environmental practices in classes, these experiences taught me how to effectively conduct these practices in a leadership position. A key part of being an effective leader in implementing an environmental restoration project or environmental practice is educating the public on why the practice will benefit them as well as the environment. My presentation will showcase the insights that I gained on being a leader in the sustainability and environmental field as well as demonstrate how my experiences enhanced my understanding of material learned in class.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 217

Franz, Brynn Persad, Malini Do Initial Body Mass Index Levels Affect Vitamin D Deficiency in Pregnant Women?
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Vitamin D is a component of fetal development that contributes to fetal skeletal and nervous system development. It has been found that all pregnant women should receive Vitamin D supplementation during pregnancy, either in the form of a pill or prenatal vitamin. A secondary analysis of a randomized controlled trial, spanning from October 2016- August 2019, was performed to investigate the relationship between Vitamin 25(OH)D (Vitamin D) levels and obesity status in pregnancy. Women with a confirmed singleton intrauterine pregnancy between 12-16 weeks were included in this study. maternal samples were collected in the first and third trimesters to analyze. At the time of delivery, a cord blood sample was collected. These samples were assessed for their Vitamin 25(OH)D levels. Maternal characteristics (i.e. demographics) were collected using electronic medical records. A total of 177 gravid women were included in the study, 42.4% of whom were obese. It was concluded that pre-pregnancy body mass index was inversely related to Vitamin 25(OH)D levels, which is a fat-soluble vitamin. Based on this, Vitamin D supplementation should be considered in pregnancy when a patient has a higher body mass index.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 107

Teder, Camryn Reinhardt, Sara What College Radio Has Done for Me
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For the entirety of my third and final year of college, I have had the privilege of serving as the editor-in-chief of WUSC-FM’s music blog. I was encouraged to apply last year by my predecessor after contributing some articles to the blog the previous year. After applying and going through the interview process, I was accepted. Jumping into my position in May, I quickly learned by experience and found that having this new title would mean having to wear many other hats besides my usual writer's one. I have spent the last 11 months creating training manuals for DJs, setting up interviews, writing articles, connecting with bands, managers, and artists, editing videos and photos, negotiating for press passes to top music festivals, and more. More than that, I have been able to support a whole team of creators and learned that confidence and taking risks can get you far. I took on this position because of how much I’ve come to love being a part of the college radio community, a team of over 100 DJs, both students and alumni, with distinct music tastes and styles. I had no idea I had the confidence or the tenacity to take on many of these projects before I started, but I made it a mission to turn my own ideas and goals of the DJ community into a reality. Through being an editor I have found a greater sense of resilience, a deeper love for music, and an amazing support system within the music industry. I value this experience more than any other internship I’ve had. To be able to create lifelong memories for me, DJs, and artists alike have been invaluable.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 253

McCarter, Kenzie Epps, Lauren Delight Ministries and Its Impact on My College Career, My Growth, and My Future
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Delight Ministries started at Belmont University’s campus 9 years ago and since then it has multiplied to over 250 chapters across the US - including a very special chapter of women right here at the University of South Carolina. Upon entering college, I knew that I wanted to find a community of Christian women to walk alongside me and push me to become a better, blooming version of myself. I felt very thankful to have stumbled upon Delight Ministries and have fallen deeply in love with its values. This ministry has impacted my college career in a variety of ways and has slowly shaped the future that I envision for myself going forward. Beginning during the spring of my sophomore year, I started serving on UofSC’s Delight Leadership Team as a book coordinator - before growing into the position of Team Director. Over the course of my three years on campus, I have developed immensely in my knowledge of ministries functioning as nonprofits, leadership, and my relationship with the God I follow. My presentation will describe the insights that I gained from being a member and leader of Delight Ministries, the concept of nonprofits, and how I will use this experience going forward.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 246

Day, Erin Reinhardt, Sara Having confidence in my knowledge
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Abstract Text

Over the summer, I was an intern for Boeing, an American aerospace company focused on the manufacturing and production of airplanes. I served as both an operations procurement agent and supply chain management analyst on the materials and standards team out of Charleston, South Carolina. As an intern with a new set of eyes, I was responsible for finding areas of improvement for the team and discussing solutions. In addition, I completed all the daily tasks such as attending meetings to support the production line as well as producing performance metrics for the team and confirming that parts were coded correctly in the MRP systems. I was always interested in my supply chain classes and when I got to use my knowledge in a work setting, I found myself seeking out how to improve the processes that my team had been following. My main project for the summer was to help reduce excess and obsolete inventory in order to save the company money as well as free up space in the warehouses for other parts. I was able to comb through hundreds of part numbers and assess where the inventory could be reduced and sold or if it should just be sent to scrap. This process taught me a lot about how to analytically think about how to increase efficiency in a supply chain as well as save money wherever possible since it adds up quickly. I found that working with real-life parts and money was very similar to simulations that I had done in my classes, which gave me confidence in my knowledge of production and inventory management. I found that teammates who had been with the company for several years were coming to me with questions about their parts and asking my opinion. I look forward to working with my team after graduation and continuing to help improve their inventory management system as well as create new performance metrics to increase efficiency in the materials and standards division.

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 239

Graham, Aidan Epps, Lauren Self-reflection is the formula for growth
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Abstract Text

There are many things in my college career that I hold close to my heart. Undoubtedly my education, my friends, all the fun I’ve had these last four years: I wouldn’t be where I am today without those experiences. When I think back on leadership however, one particular experience sticks out to me more than the rest. During my second semester of Junior year, I was selected to be a University 101 Peer Leader, which would become the capstone experience of my college career. I began the role in August of my Senior year, along with EDLP 520: The Teacher as the Manager, a “discussion group” style class of other peer leaders which met once a week. Although I was nervous at first, I soon realized the advantages that came with the position. Three classes instructing with one class soundly analyzing my performance in EDLP every week allowed for personal growth in management, planning, and public speaking. I formed personal relationships with each of my 19 students, my co-instructor, and my EDLP peers, which only better equipped me for success in the role. While there are many, the biggest takeaway from my peer leading experience was recognizing the power of self-reflection. In a world that changes as quickly as ours, the ability to adapt to changes in the environment is an essential trait of any leader. But this ability could never be consummated without first reflecting on historical performance both internally (personal) and externally (environment). As the great American poet, Maya Angelou, once said: “you can’t really know where you’re going until you know where you’ve been.” My peer leading experience showed me the truth behind those words, for which I am forever grateful. In short, perfection, as I’ve learned, is impossible. Even the most perfect-seeming people have made mistakes they’ve had to learn from at one point or another. Thus, the key to successful leadership lies in one’s ability to reflect.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 165

Mobley, John Brooks, John Uses of Healthcare System Medical Services by Athletes after Injury at the High School Level
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Abstract Text

Purpose/Hypothesis: Prior studies have shown decreased health care utilization and an increased likelihood of seeking emergency room services rather than primary care consultations for health concerns among lower socioeconomic (SES) populations. Access, utilization, and timeliness of referred healthcare services in schools with full-time athletic trainers and physicians has yet to be explored within public health. The purpose of this study was to describe and compare injuries and healthcare service utilization by school SES over one academic year. It is hypothesized that athletes at lower SES high schools will use a lower ratio of healthcare services compared to athletes from higher SES schools. Materials/Methods: A validated injury and healthcare service process prospectively collected data from one large school district. The school district provides full-time sports medicine care for high schools. Percentage of free and reduced lunch (FRPL) for each school was calculated to stratify schools into high (

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Columbia Ballroom (CMCC upper level)
 Poster: 109

Brown, Natalie Nolan, Melissa
Boehme, Hunter
Barbershops and Beauty Salons as Community Anchors in Black Neighborhoods: Crime Deterrence, Social Cohesion, and the Impact of COVID-19
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Abstract Text

Barbershops and beauty salons have been important cultural institutions for Black communities for decades. Further, public health scholarship has highlighted the health benefits of frequenting barbershops and beauty salons. Theoretical criminology tends to focus on what factors create crime-prone individuals or areas. However, limited scholarly interest is paid to what businesses and land uses provide benefit to the surrounding area. One quantitative study has suggested that street segments with barbershops and beauty salons were associated with reductions in crime counts (Boehme, 2022). The present study takes a qualitative approach through in-depth interviews with owners of barbershops and beauty salons in predominantly Black neighborhoods of two Southeastern cities to better understand the crime-reducing mechanisms that may make such locations virtue locales. Further, we investigate how the COVID-19 pandemic has affected their ability to subvert potential criminal behavior nearby their business. Results from 13 interviews, a discussion of the findings, and policy and theoretical implications will be presented.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 43

Daniels, Kaylin Kubickova, Marketa Taking Journalism and Using It to Educate About Spotting Fake News
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Abstract Text

When I decided to pursue Professional and Civic Engagement in the fall of, 2019 I was curious myself about what problems I wanted to solve. It wasn’t until spring, 2021 that I was introduced to UofSC courses JOUR 501 and JOUR 542. They showed me narrative manipulation in news and how the digital sphere has made it easy for fake news to be spread. There were topics about how salience is determined by biased reporters, and how conglomerates like Facebook have allowed misinformation to spread like wildfire. As a media scholar this troubled me greatly, this is neglectful and dangerous to the general population. I did the required coursework and extra research to see how this problem would be properly addressed. An issue I found was that technology will continue to evolve, so we have to keep up with what is considered real news. Another is that media literacy is not taken seriously enough to be considered a skill in this age. Lastly, morals and ethics are not strong enough to control the flow of fake news. I recently learned that colleges are taking the necessary steps to make media literacy imperative, but this would be late for this generation. It is at this point young people have deficits and are already accustomed to bad habits in ingesting “news.” I already have the education to understand and spot fake news, but I wanted to act professionally by helping fight against fake news. My internship is centered on sharing real stories by real people, verification and background checking are a must. The next best thing is educating the public on mediocre news and what it is being done to eliminate it. I have done the research and submitted notes from the Pew Research Center. I’m in the beginning stages of finding ways to teach a larger audience about repelling fake news, misinformation, and disinformation. My goal is to make this journey more prevalent in my career.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 161

Rizzo, Diana Ismail, Briahnna Promoting Healthy Youth Development Through the Lenses of Public Health and Psychology
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Abstract Text

Since the beginning of my Junior year at UofSC I have been involved with the Connect Lab as a Research Assistant. Through this role, I have helped develop and facilitate various physical activity games and challenges with elementary and middle school-aged children at after school programs around Columbia, SC. The work we do focuses on addressing the public health concern of childhood obesity and its long-term effects. From a public health standpoint, the games we play with the children encourage them to engage in physical activity which can help them lose or manage their weight, relieve stress, and sleep better at night. From the standpoint of psychology, we encourage the children to work together as a team to accomplish a common goal, and have the staff serve as role models. All of these factors help to promote healthy youth development and have an overall positive impact on society. As a future physician assistant (PA), it is my goal to take the knowledge and skills I have learned through my coursework and experiences outside of school and put them into practice when caring for my patients. Being able to understand the content in my public health and psychology courses enables me to address complex issues in the community with a holistic approach. These unique experiences will allow me to connect with my patients, educate them, and advocate for their health.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 193

Seigler, Kaeleigh Weidner, David Identifying genes that effect mPing transposition in yeast
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Abstract Text

Transposable elements are DNA sequences that excise and re-insert randomly throughout the genome, creating mutations and altering the genome size. Researching the mechanisms controlling their movement is important because of the large impact they have on genome evolution. mPing is a miniature transposable element from rice that uses transposase proteins to catalyze its movement. mPing is unique in that it is much more active in comparison to other transposable elements in the rice genome, resulting in altered expression of some genes. A yeast transposition assay was previously developed to study mPing’s transposition mechanism. The goal of this project is to identify which Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Baker’s yeast) genes affect mPing transposition. To achieve this, approximately 700 yeast genomic library clones were screened for the ability to alter mPing transposition. Eight clones were identified as being potential candidates because they showed interesting levels of mPing transposition. We performed a growth curve to determine if the clones affected the yeast growth rate. Genomic clones that were found to have normal growth rates were retested in transposition assays to verify their effect on transposition. Sequencing was performed on the genomic clones that were shown to be significantly different than the control to determine which genes are present.

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 91

DiNovo, John
Simon, Nimmy
Thompson, Benjamin
Leone, Andres
Ethical dilemmas and legal implications of maternal somatic support in neurologically devastating injuries before the age of fetal viability
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Abstract Text

Objectives: 1. Developing an objective approach to personal ethical dilemmas and biases in palliative care team members 2. Assessing the medical and legal implications of life prolonging treatment for the peri viable maternal fetal dyad. 3. Determine next of kin for patients with nontraditional family dynamics. Background: Palliative care teams are often consulted to help guide ethical dilemmas in patient care. Specialist involvement complexes medical decision making as well as the appointed surrogate decision maker as the maternal-fetal dyad are not separate entities. Personal beliefs and state laws may also shape the direction of conversations. Case Description: CT is a 31 y/o G3P2 23w5d gestation that presented as a trauma after sustaining penetrating ballistic injuries with resulting nonsurvivable intracranial injury. She was placed on life supporting measures. Palliative care was consulted to facilitate goals of care conversations alongside trauma surgery and maternal fetal medicine. CT is legally married but cordially separated from her husband who is not the father of the fetus. He became incapacitated after a drug overdose requiring life support and hospitalization himself. When he became capable of decision-making capacity, he deferred to the patient’s parents who wanted to stop life sustaining treatment and allow natural death of the mother with resulting fetal demise. The case was reviewed by legal with the department of social services. The fetus was considered viable by maternal fetal medicine which meant that it would be a protected entity under South Carolina laws. CT remained in the ICU for 55 days on life support until she was emergently c-sectioned at 31w3d. After delivery of fetus, the mother underwent brain death testing. She was pronounced dead shortly after the fetus was delivered. Conclusion: The role of palliative care in offering family support in complex medical cases can be confounded by personal ethical beliefs and state specific laws.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Columbia Ballroom (CMCC upper level)
 Poster: 82

Cook-Compton, Makaylen Foxworth, Sheri Building Rapport and Forming Meaningful Connections with Autistic Individuals
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Abstract Text

This presentation will work to summarize my experiences through the process of becoming a Registered Behavior Technician (RBT). After completing the 40 Hour Training Program through the Autism Partnership Foundation in May of 2021, I became eligible to work as an RBT and began my role with my first autistic client. Identifiable details of this client will be excluded from my presentation with the minimal details being that he is an 8 year old male. The scope of the presentation will focus mainly on my experience in learning to fill this role and meet the expectations of an RBT, with the most significant emphasis being placed on building rapport and forming meaningful connections. This role required me to enter my clients home 2-3 times a week to provide home-based Applied Behavioral Analysis (ABA) services, beginning in June of 2021 and continuing to the present day. This entailed developing relationships with my client as well as his family, becoming accustomed to the professional aspects of the role, and learning to be effective and intentional with the time spent with my client. This experience has been extremely significant in exposing me to on the ground work in psychology, and skills learned in this role will be carried with me as I pursue my Masters of Education in Clinical Mental Health Counseling beginning in the summer of 2022. With autism being an area of great interest for me in terms of future research and professional pursuits, I am extremely grateful for the exposure and opportunities that have been provided to me in this role and will always remember the lessons learned through them.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 160

Sattele, Lauren Wong, Andrew
Worts, Phillip
Knee Glomangioma, a Cause of Extreme Knee Pain: A Case Report
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Abstract Text

A 46-year-old physically active male patient presented with severe right knee pain located anteriorly and superior to the patella. He reported that over the last four years, if anything bumped the anterior superior knee, the pain would cause his knee to buckle. The pain felt “close to the skin” and as if a palpable mass within the skin kept “resurfacing”. Physical examination was performed and was unremarkable except for a ~2mm mass superior to the patella that produced a ~7mm elevation of the skin. The mass was mobile during extension of the knee and produced significant pain upon palpation. Radiographic images were obtained and revealed a normal right knee with no radiopaque object visible superior and anterior to the patella. The clinician had a high suspicion of a glomus tumor, having seen one before. The patient was scheduled for surgical excision and biopsy of the mass. Following surgical excision, Pathology identified the mass as a subcutaneous glomangioma – a type of tumor typically found within the digits. Glomus tumors are neuromyoarterial in type, originating from the glomus body. They only make up about 1.6% of all soft tissue tumors and most commonly are found within the nail bed. Only 33% of glomus tumors have ever been reported in the lower extremity. These benign neoplasms are found in equal occurrences between men and women, but the extra-digital location occurs significantly more in men. Reported cases in the knee are quite rare. Prior to this report, only one case was published as a subcutaneous glomangioma directly superior to the patella not located within a muscle, but this report detailed a mass visible on imaging (Ultrasound). Our patient had no distinguishable masses upon imaging. Complete surgical excision is the only known curative method. At follow-up appointments dating up to 9 years after the surgery was performed, there have been no reoccurrences of a glomangioma or the related symptoms. The patient has been completely free of pain and was able to return to daily activities and fitness training.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Columbia Ballroom (CMCC upper level)
 Poster: 89

Drake, Brianna Pazda, Adam Examining Dehumanization of Individuals with Schizophrenia
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Objective: Previous literature examines dehumanization of marginalized groups; though, most of this work focuses on ethnic and racial groups. Currently, there is a gap in the literature examining the extent to which people with mental illness are dehumanized. This study will test whether people with schizophrenia are dehumanized (relative to other marginalized groups, such as drug addicts). Furthermore, this research will investigate if using “person-first” language can attenuate dehumanization. Method: Participants (n=306) will be recruited from Amazon Mechanical Turk to complete a measure of dehumanization and demeaning needs for each of four targets (i.e., self, close friend, schizophrenic , drug addict). Each measure will be slightly altered to incorporate person-first and noun-based labels for each target, which will be randomly assigned between participants. Anticipated Results: Participants will dehumanize schizophrenia targets and drug addiction targets the most (H1). Specifically, the schizophrenia targets will be dehumanized to the highest degree, followed by drug addicts. Further, I anticipate that participants with person-first target labels will dehumanize targets less than participants with the noun-based labels (H2).

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Columbia Ballroom (CMCC upper level)
 Poster: 37

Jackson, Caden Lowell, Randy Meditation as a Means of Reducing Aggression and Racial Implicit Bias within an Eyetracking Shoot/No-Shoot Task
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Abstract Text

Unprecedented violence against African Americans by police officers in the United States has drawn national attention, highlighted by recent cases like Eric Garner, Philando Castille, and George Floyd. The death of African Americans at the hands of police has created a need to address what can be done to prevent more of these tragedies, such as interventions to mitigate the effects of racial implicit bias. Recently, mindful meditation has become a subject of discussion in reducing implicit bias (Lueke & Gibson, 2014; Sun, 2015), but less is known about whether meditation reduces the particular form of aggression present during the aforementioned police encounters; nor about the attentional processes unfolding during this type of encounter (i.e. eye movements). The current study examines the potential of mindful meditation as a means to reduce racial implicit bias and racially disproportionate reactions within a computer-generated scenario among a civilian sample of participants. During their first lab visit, students completed surveys regarding mindfulness and personality, and were randomly assigned to meditation, control attention, or control condition. The meditation group underwent brief mindful meditation training and, in between visits, practiced daily. The control attention group listened for a target word in a story. The control group listened to a story without attending for a particular target. Next, eye-tracking was used during a computer-generated shoot/no-shoot task, including a male character 1) holding a weapon or non-weapon, 2) was African American or Caucasian, and 3) had a fearful or angry expression. Regions of interest were created within the eyetracking program around the face and the hand that held the object. The participant pressed a key as quickly as possible to “shoot” if they perceived a threat or “not shoot” if no threat was perceived. Then participants completed race and weapons Implicit Association Tests. They repeated this procedure upon returning a week later. Preliminary analyses have revealed an influence of meditation condition on the way that participants process the shoot/no-shoot images and react to them, interacting with the presence of a weapon and the characteristics of the protagonist. Additional implications of meditation on implicit racial bias will be discussed.

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 17

Currie, Madisyn
Henry, Joseph
Lenhard, Matthew Use of Vaginal Iodine Preparation in High-Risk Pregnant Population to Reduce Risk of Post-Cesarean Endometritis
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Abstract Text

Endometritis is an ascending pelvic infection that can complicate postpartum care for women, especially after delivering via cesarean section (c-section). Post-cesarean endometritis can increase morbidity and cost for women who give birth. The data on vaginal iodine cleansing before c-section is conflicting. Our goal is to determine the impact of a vaginal iodine preparation prior to c-section on incidence of endometritis with patients at Prisma Health Midlands. We hypothesize that women having an unplanned c-section who receive a vaginal iodine preparation prior to surgery will have a decreased incidence of endometritis. Data was collected using retrospective and prospective methods, and were evaluated on demographics of the population at Prisma Health Midlands. Retrospective data from previous years at Prisma Health Midlands was analyzed to find participants who fit the inclusion criteria. These participants were used as the control group, while prospective patients were consented at Prisma Health to receive a vaginal iodine preparation. Collection is still ongoing, but several preliminary data points have been obtained. Increased average time in labor correlated to greater incidence of endometritis with a P-value of 0.0196. A fever (> 38℃) was confirmed as a screening tool (p value <0.0001) for endometritis with a specificity of 99.2% and sensitivity of 69.2%. It was found that there was not a significant difference between white and black populations for the care and diagnosis of endometritis. Data collection is ongoing and will include 100 participants in order to increase the power of the study. Once these goals are met, more data analyses will be conducted. Future research on this topic includes expanding the generalizability of the study beyond large academic centers to include more rural areas.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Columbia Ballroom (CMCC upper level)
 Poster: 131

Talluri, Simon Spence, Gina How to better utilize the Career Center
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Abstract Text

I started my position as a Career Studio Peer Educator with the UofSC Career Center in Fall of my junior year. In this position I assisted students and alumni with career help such as fixing their resumes, cover letters, CV's, Personal Statements and even helped them find jobs/internships. I wanted this position because I love helping people in any way I can, the knowledge I gained from this position has not only transformed my life but anyone that I have shared it with. Something I have noticed in college students is that many of them focus on the now and are afraid to think about the future career that the are working towards. While this may be normal, at least preparing for the future with a resume and an understanding of the industry they would like to break into should be crucial. This is where the Career Center can come in and change Student's lives with the things they can learn from just one visit. It is not just what they can learn but also the resources they will be introduced to that can shape their careers in amazing ways. The student body needs to take more initiative to seek guidance and help on their career if they need it and the Career Center, while already doing a thousand things to show their services to the student body, must think more strategically in their approach to marketing their services.

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 242

Yelverton, Valerie Ostermann, Jan
Weissman, Sharon
Qiao, Shan
Natafgi, Nabil
Olatosi, Bankole
Social determinants of health exacerbate implementation and access barriers to telehealth HIV care in the Southern United States: Results from a scoping review of research and intervention needs.
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Abstract Text

Background: The South is the epicenter of the HIV epidemic in the US, with a disproportionate burden of HIV among racial and ethnic minorities and rural-living communities. Telehealth was rapidly implemented to mitigate widespread interruption of HIV care services due to COVID-19, however not all persons with HIV (PWH) benefited from telehealth. This study sought to understand how intervention needs and research gaps described in the academic literature related to telehealth barriers experienced by PWH and HIV care providers in Southern US. Methods: In August 2021, PubMed, Embase, CINAHL, PsycINFO, and Web of Science were searched for publications describing telehealth in HIV care during COVID-19 following PRISMA-ScR guidance. Search terms were organized in three domains: HIV, telehealth, and COVID-19. Literature was analyzed and synthesized using thematic analysis and meta-synthesis methodology. Results: Thirteen peer-reviewed articles were included in this study; four of which described implementation and access barriers to telehealth HIV care in the South; and twelve outlined intervention needs and research gaps to sustain and improve telehealth HIV care. Reported barriers to telehealth HIV care were categorized into four domains: technology-related barriers, virtual nature of HIV care visits, policies and regulations, and social determinants of health (SDH). SDH were reported to amplify other barriers to telehealth HIV care such as limited access to technology, lack of rural connectivity, low digital literacy, and feeling uncomfortable with virtual visits. Intervention needs and research gaps identified in the literature were mapped by barrier domains and extended by a health outcomes domain. Intervention needs and research gaps included new telehealth options, provider and patient trainings, virtual communication training and research, best practice guidelines, technology distribution programs and broadband internet expansion, criteria for telehealth receipt, permanent policy changes to enable telehealth, assessing telehealth effects on clinical outcomes, and addressing SDH. Conclusions: SDH interact with other barriers to telehealth HIV care in the Southern US. While the identified intervention needs and research gaps address multiple telehealth barrier domains, recommended interventions to improve SDH remain unspecific. Future telehealth research and interventions must include foci on SDH and the effects of telehealth on HIV care outcomes.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Columbia Ballroom (CMCC upper level)
 Poster: 48

Bazell, Anna Stewart, Jason
Schuck, Logan
Functional Analysis of STN1 Winged Helix (wH) Domains
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Abstract Text

CST (CTC1-STN1-TEN1) is a heterotrimeric RPA-like protein complex that preferentially binds to single-stranded DNA (ssDNA). CST is conserved from yeast to humans and has been found to play a role in telomere maintenance, DNA replication, and DNA repair. Mutations in CST, specifically in the subunits of CTC1 and STN1, have been implicated in the development of the genetic diseases Coats plus and dyskeratosis congenita, bone marrow failure, and intestinal bleeding. Despite the known functions of CST, the mechanistic relationship between its structure and function has yet to be characterized, particularly with respect to its protein-protein interactions and DNA binding. A recent cryo-electron microscopy structure of CST revealed that it has two winged helix (wH) domains in its STN1 subunit. Based on the previous analysis of the wH domain in RPA, a homologous protein to CST, we hypothesized that deletion of the STN1 wH domains will disrupt interaction with known binding partners. To test this, we generated STN1 mutants lacking the wH domains and investigated CST protein-protein interactions with MCM2-7, DNA polymerase alpha-primase, and TPP1. The analysis of how CST’s structure is responsible for its mechanistic action has important implications for characterizing and developing potential treatments for diseases correlated with CST mutations.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 102

McLean, Marnie Lane-Cordova, Abbi Augmentation Index and Pulse Wave Velocity After Delivery in Women with and without an Adverse Pregnancy Outcome
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Introduction: Adverse pregnancy outcomes (APOs), such as preterm birth, gestational diabetes, and hypertensive disorders of pregnancy, are associated with higher maternal risk of cardiovascular disease years later. Research is limited regarding sensitive measures of vascular function in the early years following delivery. Purpose: To determine if women with a history of APO have differential wave reflection and arterial stiffness in the 6 months to 3 years following delivery. Methods: Seventy-nine women (mean age=32.7±0.6 years; 58 White/19 Black/1 Asian; 31 [39.2%] with a past APO) who delivered a singleton infant 6 months-3 years ago were included. Women were excluded if they were smokers, had diabetes, or used protease inhibitors. Following an overnight fast, participants completed a single study visit where brachial blood pressure was measured using an oscillometric cuff and applanation tonometry. Wave reflection (augmentation index; AIx) and central arterial stiffness (central pulse wave velocity; cPWV) were assessed. History of APO was determined via self-report. Wilcoxon rank-sum tests or t-tests were used to test for differences in means between APO groups. Results: Body mass index was higher in women who had an APO (31.8±1.4 vs 26.5±1.1 kg/m2, p

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Columbia Ballroom (CMCC upper level)
 Poster: 49

Sarmukadam, Kimaya The relationship between resting-state neural oscillations and language impairment in post-stroke aphasia: A pilot study
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The relationship between resting-state neural oscillations and language impairment in post-stroke aphasia: A pilot study Kimaya Sarmukadam, Roozbeh Behroozmand Speech Neuroscience Lab, Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Arnold School of Public Health, University of South Carolina Aphasia is a leading cause of communication disability in stroke survivors with left-hemisphere brain damage and is characterized by deficits in the production and comprehension of speech and language. The purpose of the current pilot study was to investigate the relationship between brain oscillations in the resting state and language impairment in post-stroke aphasia. Resting-state electroencephalographic (rsEEG) signals were collected from eight participants with post-stroke aphasia during eyes-closed and eyes-opened conditions (four females, age range: 47.58-70.83 yrs., M: 61.16 yrs., SD: 6.99 yrs.) who have undergone language assessment using the Revised Western Aphasia Battery (WAB-R). Power spectral density (PSD) of rsEEG neural oscillations was calculated for both conditions in delta (0.5-3.5 Hz), theta (4-7.5 Hz), alpha (8-12.5 Hz), beta (13-30 Hz), and gamma (30-50 Hz) frequency bands. Our results demonstrated that increased PSD in delta and alpha bands was associated with reduced auditory comprehension and object naming, as indexed by the WAB-R scores. In addition, lesion-mapping analysis revealed that the left insula, left arcuate fasciculus and left cortico-ponto-cerebellar pathway is primarily associated with increased PSD in delta and alpha bands within our aphasia group and during both experimental conditions. These preliminary findings demonstrate the potential for identifying specific neural oscillatory components and further exploring the relationship between rsEEG, lesion location, and behavioral measures of aphasia severity to improve individualized treatment for participants with post-stroke aphasia.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Columbia Ballroom (CMCC upper level)
 Poster: 183

McMorris, Caleigh Grewe, Maureen Research Backed Investment Strategy: How I Stopped Playing a Guessing Game
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Imagine you are given $1,000,000 and you are required to invest it in the stock market immediately, but you have no experience. What would you do? For me, I encountered this scenario Sophomore year of college, but thankfully I was using play money because it was a stock market simulation. In order to heighten the stakes, my professor informed my peers and I that our performance would determine a portion of our overall grade. Upon hearing this, I looked around at my fellow overachieving classmates and started to panic. Similar to my peers, I had become accustomed to excelling in my academic career up until this point. In IBUS 310, Introduction to International Business, I experienced a rude awakening, as I discovered the difference between academics and education. Academic success was something that came naturally to me, but when it came to educational success that was a whole new learning experience. At first, I found myself completing my homework in two hours and coming to class realizing I was completely unprepared. I wondered why this class was so different from my other classes and that is where I discovered the distinction between academics and education. Adopting the new approach of understanding, absorbing, and learning the assigned material, I found myself spending 4-6 hours preparing for class, so that I could actually add value. After developing a routine, another obstacle was thrown at us midway through the semester. The investment simulation consumed me, as my competitive, perfectionist self would not accept defeat. Fast forward a few weeks, I was nearing the bottom of the leader board due to my behavior-oriented investment strategy, which led me to employ a research-oriented investment strategy. Unsurprisingly, I quickly started to climb the leaderboard, but a few weeks later Covid-19 was declared a pandemic, and full on panic mode ensued when my stocks began to plummet. This was a major learning experience that has influenced my personal investment strategy and my involvement with the student managed investment fund. I look forward to sharing more with you at Discover USC.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 237

Persico, Sarah Grewe, Maureen Understanding the Complexity of our Society
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Panelists representing the Carolina Judicial Council (CJC) play a major role in the lives of their student peers. During my time at the University of South Carolina, I had the amazing opportunity to become a member of this organization. I had joined CJC in an effort to become more involved on campus and introduce the trial aspect of the law to myself in a smaller setting. Fortunately, I gained so much more and have been able to grow in my classes and other activities as a result. Being a criminal justice major meant that I would take classes that would constantly challenge the way I thought. Through my classes and the cases I have heard on the Carolina Judicial Council I realized just how complex our society is; nothing is truly black and white. Understanding the importance of background information and differential circumstances has assisted me as a CJC panelist, undergraduate research assistant, and most importantly a student that will never stop learning. My presentation will discuss how through membership on the Carolina Judicial Council I was shown the importance of details and background and how I have grown as a result of this.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 247

Locke, Corinne Dobek, Whitney Assessing identification of newly diagnosed breast cancer patients for referral to genetic counseling
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National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) guidelines provide recommendations for which patients with breast cancer should seek genetic testing for a hereditary cancer syndrome. NCCN has expanded testing guidelines, and studies have shown individuals meeting criteria are missed in current clinical practice. Cancer family history intake can be incomplete even when taken by providers. It is expected that a family history, as gathered by a genetic counselor, will find additional individuals who meet criteria for a referral for genetic counseling and testing. Patients with a new diagnosis of breast cancer were presented at breast conference at Prisma Health-Midlands. Those who were found to not meet NCCN criteria were contacted, and their personal and family history was collected via telephone or online questionnaire. Forty individuals provided information about their personal and family history. Descriptive statistics were used to determine the percentage of people eligible for testing who had been missed during the intake. The response rate was higher for the phone pedigree compared to the questionnaire. Eleven (27.5%) individuals were found to meet NCCN criteria after additional family history assessment. Pedigrees were taken for 21 of the patients, and seven (33.3%) were found to meet NCCN criteria after pedigree was reviewed. An additional 19 patients completed online questionnaires, and four (21.1%) were found to meet NCCN criteria after their additional family history was reviewed. The most common cancers in a family history that were overlooked by previous provider intake were pancreatic and prostate cancers. These findings will aid in adjusting internal workflows at Prisma Health-Midlands to continue to increase identification of patients appropriate for genetic counseling and testing.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Columbia Ballroom (CMCC upper level)
 Poster: 73

Bucko, Agnes Pate, Russell Provider practices and children’s obesogenic behaviors in South Carolina’s family child care homes
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Introduction: Little is known about the role family child care homes (FCCHs) play in childhood obesity prevention efforts. This study compared FCCHs that were enrolled in South Carolina’s ABC Quality Rating System (QRIS) to FCCHs not enrolled in South Carolina’s ABC QRIS. Comparisons were made to examine whether there were any differences in FCCH’s 1) diet and physical activity (PA) policies and practices, and 2) child level health behaviors. Methods: Means and percentages were used to describe the sample. T-tests and Chi-square analyses were used to compare FCCH policies and practices. Nutrition and PA environments were assessed using an Environment and Policy Assessment and Observations (EPAO) tool, and additional FCCH policies and practices were assessed via reports from FCCH providers. T-tests and Chi-square analyses were also used to compare child-level health behaviors. Children’s PA was measured via accelerometry, sleep was measured via actigraphy, and diet was assessed via direct observation. Results: Comparisons were made on 77 FCCHS (N=25 enrolled in ABC QRIS). There were no significant differences in policies and practices between ABC vs non-ABC FCCHs. EPAO scores for the nutrition and PA environments were 7.2 (SD=3.2) and 1.2 (SD=0.3), respectively. PA training was provided for 14.3% of parents and 57.1% of children, and 63.6% of providers participated in yearly nutrition training. There were no significant differences in physical activity levels and diet between children in ABC vs non-ABC FCCHs. Children (N=260) were physically active for 11.2 (SD=4.1) mins/hour, had a screen time of 53.3 (SD=44.7) mins/day, slept for 11.9 (SD=2.4) hrs/night, and consumed 532.5 (SD=206.1) cals/day. Conclusions: There were no differences in FCCH policies and practices or in children’s behaviors based on the FCCHs enrollment in South Carolina’s ABC QRIS. Future research should focus on developing ways to improve the implementation of obesity prevention standards in FCCHs.

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Columbia Ballroom (CMCC upper level)
 Poster: 23

Raven, Courtney Wellman, Denise The Impact of Service-Learning
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Statistics show that children who are not reading on their grade level by third grade are four times less likely to graduate (Double Jeopardy, 2012). I am an Americorps member, serving at United Way of the Midlands with the Reading Consortium. Americorps is an organization that strives to “improve lives, strengthen communities, and foster civic engagement through service and volunteering” (About). The Midlands Reading Consortium is a reading program that tutors primarily pre-kindergarten to third graders who are below reading level. I am serving as a liaison between the schools and volunteers organizing tutoring services. I chose to serve in this organization because I am interested in pursuing work as a social worker within the criminal justice system. Studies show that those who drop out of high school are 63% more likely to be incarcerated than those who graduate college (The Consequences of Dropping Out of High School, 2009). I want to make even a small change with these kids now and work to change the system as a whole through all the small changes I can make on my own. I have learned many lessons through this experience, the biggest one being how to work through the complex problems that come with working between two organizations and with so many people as well as learning when to ask for help. This organization helps target one factor that research shows increases your likelihood to end up incarcerated. I hope that through this presentation I can show the importance of starting intervention young and helping those in need. I plan on taking a gap year and continuing with this program is one option that I am considering. I have enjoyed my experience and feel like there’s much more for me to learn. Even if I choose a different opportunity, the skills I learned in this experience will set me up for success in my future pursuits.

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 176

Mallozzi, Isabella
Jatoi, Fatima
Cooper, Daniel Identifying How Patterns of Adversity Shape Families’ Response to the Head Start Program
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The Head Start program was first implemented in 1965 to promote school readiness for pre-school age children from low-income families by enhancing their cognitive, social, and emotional development. The purpose of this study is to review current literature on the efficacy of long-term effects on early childhood development based on Head Start program participation and identify patterns of adversity among Head Start program families. Our primary research aims are to (1) identify risk profiles based on children’s exposures to various combinations of risk factors, (2) determine how risk profile membership is related to child development outcomes, and (3) determine whether the relation between risk profile and child development is different depending on whether the child received the Head Start intervention. Assessing these patterns of early adversity and how they influence children’s responses to the Head Start program can help us to understand who benefits most from early intervention and who may need additional support. Identifying how participation in Head Start impacts cognitive and social-emotional skills from preschool through elementary school is vital to determining the long-term efficacy of the Head Start program.

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 67

Cook, Cameron
Clayton, Paul
Richardson, William Paradoxical Embolism: A case study
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Pulmonary Embolism is a relatively common presentation to the emergency department with an estimated prevalence of 60-70 per 100,000 using data from the pre-Covid era (Some data suggest that incidence has as much as doubled during the pandemic). Associated morbidity and mortality are loosely correlated with thromboembolic burden. In order of descending acuity these classifications are divided into massive, submassive, segmental and subsegmental. Herein we explore an anomalous presentation of catastrophic massive pulmonary embolism with an atypical complication, paradoxical embolization of the SMA and likely elsewhere. We will also explore the unique diagnostic modalities employed, treatment options available and undertaken in this particular case.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Columbia Ballroom (CMCC upper level)
 Poster: 90

Smith, Corinne Downey, Austin
Imran, Jasim
UAV Rapidly-Deployable Stage Sensor with Electro-permanent Magnet Docking Mechanism for Flood Monitoring in Undersampled Watersheds.
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The availability of historical flood data is vital in recognizing weather-related trends and outlining necessary precautions for at-risk communities. Flood frequency, magnitude, endurance, and volume are traditionally recorded using established streamgages; however, the material and installation costs allow only a few streamgages in a region, which yield a narrow data selection. In particular, stage, the vertical water height in a water body, is an important parameter in determining flood trends. This work investigates a low-cost, compact, rapidly-deployable alternative to traditional stage sensors that will allow for denser sampling within a watershed and a more detailed record of flood events. The package uses a HC-SR04 ultrasonic sensor to measure stage, onboard memory for recording flood events, and an electropermanet magnet (EPM) to enable Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) deployments. Optional modules for solar panels and wireless communication can also be added to extend package longevity or allow wireless control of the EPM. The stage sensor package was found to have a range of 0.02 to 4 m with a 6.9 mm accuracy and capable of a 6.4 day long deployment. With the total cost of production at 271.37 USD, it is a cheaper and more flexible alternative to traditional stage sensors that will enable dense sensor networks and rapid response to flooding events.

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 152

Khan, Julia Grewe, Maureen Learning Through Hands-on Care
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In the summer of 2021, I decided to take a class and become a certified emergency medical technician (EMT). The course was 21 days with 10 days being online and the rest in person. The days were long, often from 7 am to 5 pm, but I enjoyed every moment of it. During my training, I spent a total of 48 hours working in an ambulance or an emergency room, and I quickly realized that emergency medicine was where I belonged. Once certified, I began working for a transport company in Columbia, SC. As a future physician, getting patient contact was extremely important. The majority of my time working was spent beside patients transporting them to and from their respective dialysis centers. My job required me to monitor and care for patients while we transferred them to their destination. This included physical care such as taking vital signs, but I was also responsible for supporting them emotionally. Many patients dislike their time at dialysis and experience some anxiety as we transport them to their center. I learned how to communicate with my patients in a calming and supportive way that increased their overall demeanor. My goal was always to improve my patient’s mood by the time we arrived at their destination. Through this job, I have become confident in my ability to care for and support any patient that may need it. My competence when working with patients has drastically increased, and my enjoyment of this job has solidified my future career plan of becoming an emergency physician.

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 245

Gilliam, Sophia Pou, Jay More Than a Tour Guide: What University Ambassadors Taught me About Healthcare
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During the past three years of college, I had the opportunity to serve as a University Ambassador. As a University Ambassador, I guided tours of the University for a diverse group of visitors, provided a welcoming and informative first impression of the University of South Carolina, and communicated information in a confident, professional, and meaningful way. Later, I became a Presidential Ambassador, a role in which I assisted the University President in hosting distinguished guests. Becoming a University Ambassador provided me the space to grow as an individual like no other beyond the classroom experience. Through weekly professional development and unexpected experiences, I learned to communicate effectively with those different from myself, critically think about issues that may arise within the Visitor Center, and creatively articulate my personal experiences. I learned all of these skills, while giving back to the University that gave me so much. My presentation will discuss the insights I gained throughout my time serving as a University Ambassador, and how I plan to utilize those insights in my future.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 190

Dixon, Eliza Benton, Sarah Serving as Pi Beta Phi’s Director of Service and Philanthropy: Flexible Leadership and Demonstrated Empathy
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Beginning in the spring of 2020, I had the privilege of starting my first of two semesters serving as Pi Beta Phi’s Director of Service and Philanthropy (DSP) at the University of South Carolina. Pi Phi’s philanthropy, Read> Lead>Achieve, commits to creating a more literate and productive society by inspiring a lifelong love of reading. After arriving on campus, the philanthropy drew me to joining the sorority and ultimately led me to assume my leadership position. As DSP, I was responsible for coordinating Pi Phi’s service projects, to include our weekly Champions are Readers program, and overall fundraising efforts. With the help and support of my Community Relations team, I was able to successfully plan a book drive which collected over 4,300 books to donate to graduating student teachers beginning their classroom libraries during the coronavirus pandemic amongst other fun opportunities. Serving as the DSP during the beginning of the pandemic and adapting to a virtual semester provided me an opportunity to demonstrate critical thinking skills and improve transparency when communicating, as my team worked to revamp our typical service and fundraising efforts. With constantly changing regulations we had to remain flexible and collaborate cohesively to find alternative solutions. One of my proudest moments during this role was my organization of the second highest fundraising team for the National Eating Disorders Association’s (NEDA) walk on campus. Though NEDA’s efforts do not directly coordinate with Pi Phi’s work with childhood illiteracy, the members stood united and showed their support to the UofSC and Columbia community. By doing so, they demonstrated empathy to other members who have been or continue to be challenged by eating disorders. This theme of demonstrating empathy, rather than sympathy, was a topic discussed in my EDLP 510 class, The Teacher as Manager, and is something I reflect on daily. It serves as an acknowledgement of everyone’s emotions, demonstration of compassion, and pursuit of connecting with others that I will carry with me after graduation as a leader in the professional working world.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 207

Albert, Ashton Grewe, Maureen Life Lessons from 'When in Rome'
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During the spring semester of my junior year I studied abroad at LUISS Guido Carli in Rome, Italy. Preparing to study abroad in the middle of the COVID-19 pandemic, as the lone student from Darla Moore, with no Italian language experience, was nerve wracking at first. However, I refused to let these circumstances prevent me from taking a semester to study in a new country, a dream I’d had for myself since I began looking at colleges when I was 16 years old. I wanted to take advantage of the opportunity to personally develop and supplement my time at the University of South Carolina with a global perspective. While abroad, it was easy to allow myself to feel like an odd man out, especially in the midst of the pandemic. I was one of the few Americans wandering the streets and the only student from the United States attending LUISS that semester. Despite my initial reservations, the students at LUISS embraced me for my differences and showed me the importance of acknowledging cultural differences and the positive associations of accepting them. While abroad, I learned important lessons from the people that surrounded me and the experiences they invited me to be a part of. Traveling to my roommate’s hometown of Zadar, Croatia for home cooked meals and a tour of the town and its people, was an experience I will never forget. The exposure to a new culture and continuous lessons I encountered while abroad lit an appreciation within me for immersing myself in a new place in order to learn from the people who know it best. Upon my return, I was excited to implement these lessons into my everyday life and share their importance through my interactions with others. Embracing the opportunity to study abroad was one of the most impactful decisions I could’ve made for myself and the lessons I learned were priceless and will shape my global mindset throughout the entirety of my life.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 248

Mayan, Danel
Nguyen, Kenny
Keisler, Brian National attitudes of medical students towards mandating the COVID-19 vaccine and its association with knowledge of the vaccine
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With the introduction of the novel COVID-19 vaccine, public hesitancy is being experienced with many turning to healthcare professionals for advice. As future physicians, medical students play a critical role in the public’s view of the vaccine. This study sought to determine the willingness of U.S. medical students to recommend the COVID-19 vaccine to healthcare workers and patients, as well as whether their knowledge of the vaccine plays a role in their view. The authors emailed a survey link to all U.S. medical schools with request to distribute it to their medical students. The survey included questions to determine the attitude of the medical students toward recommending the COVID-19 vaccine, and general knowledge questions about the vaccine. Chi square, Fisher’s exact test, and linear regression were conducted to determine associations between willingness to recommend the COVID-19 vaccine and general knowledge of the vaccine. Among the 1,899 responses from medical students representing 151 U.S. medical schools, 98.84% were willing to recommend the COVID-19 vaccine to patients, and 99.05% were willing to recommend it to healthcare workers. Likewise, 57.82% approved of making the vaccine mandatory to healthcare workers, and 16.27% approved of making it mandatory to patients. Additionally, those who tested most knowledgeable of the vaccine were less likely to approve of making the vaccine mandatory for patients (66.67% vs. 72.70). Those that tested most knowledgeable were also more likely to personally receive the vaccine (72.35% vs 62.99%) as opposed to those that tested the least knowledgeable who were less willing to personally receive the vaccine (4.12% vs 14.17%). The data revealed that a slight majority of medical students support a vaccine mandate toward healthcare workers while a minority of medical students support a vaccine mandate toward patients. Additionally, medical students that had relatively high knowledge of the vaccine correlated with not approving of making the vaccine mandatory for patients. However increased knowledge of the vaccine correlated with increased willingness to personally receive the vaccine.

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Columbia Ballroom (CMCC upper level)
 Poster: 139

Hebron, Tiara Pou, Jay Becoming a Nurse Advocate: Insights from Work in a Mental Health Facility
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My final, Capstone semester at UofSC was spent one on one with a nurse preceptor at a mental health facility in the Columbia area. In preparation for post graduate practice, we scheduled our own shifts of 12 hours based on our preceptor’s schedule. Each clinical day I would be responsible for between one and six patients. The day began with a basic assessment of psychiatric symptoms, where I would assess for mood, suicidal ideation, homicidal ideation, sleep patterns, appetite, delusions, and any possible symptoms of adverse medication effects. Performing this interview with patients who suffered from mental health problems that created communication barriers required me to draw on the knowledge that I learned in class regarding redirection and grounding techniques. I administered medications and provided education to clients about the role they played in their treatment. One of the most important jobs I performed was maintaining the therapeutic environment of the milieu by getting to know my clients, recognizing signs of agitation, and implementing de-escalation interventions. Each of us have a sense of our mental wellness, and yet mental health is surrounded with stigma. Nurses in every facet should be educated in providing mental health care because we encounter it regardless of its severity or patient population. This experience provided me ample opportunity to develop communication skills, interprofessional collaboration, and showed me the importance of nurse advocacy. It inspired me to pursue mental health as a specialty track after graduation. As a mental health nurse, I plan to join nursing organizations that advocate for reform in health care facilities and spread awareness of mental health within the community.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 200

McClam, Maria Workman, Lauren Examining SC Organizational Factors that Promote Client Retention Among Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting (MIECHV) Programs
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Background: The Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting (MIECHV) program provides essential supports to vulnerable families in South Carolina. This study utilized case study methodology to understand key factors that promote client retention. Evidence suggests the positive impacts of the program correlate with the amount of time that families remain in the program receiving services. Methods: Three case studies among MIECHV funded agencies with low client attrition were completed. A series of interviews were conducted with clients (n=10) and home visitors/supervisors (n=22). Additionally, an organizational assessment was conducted to better understand the context of the agency. An inductive approach was used for analysis of data. All data was combined and assessed holistically to produce a comprehensive understanding of each agency. Results: Results revealed the importance of relationship building between home visitors and clients. Clients shared that their home visitors display warmth and openness, are personable and relatable, and show respect. Agency staff and clients agreed that home visiting provides invaluable support to families. Participants shared that home visitors go above and beyond to help families prepare for childbirth, provide them with information, and give them needed supplies. Clients explained that home visitors are trusted sources of information and provide constant support. Clients also noted the difference home visiting makes for their family. Clients appreciate the focus on the importance of self-care, not just parenting, as well as support with children who have special health care needs. By listening to what clients want, home visitors can help them accomplish their goals along with the model’s goals. Lastly, participants said that flexibility in scheduling visits has helped with retention. Meeting at convenient times, as well as locations, shows the dependability and dedication of home visitors. Conclusions: Overall, key factors for client retention can be contributed to the dedication and passion that home visitors have for their clients. Clients shared their appreciation for the invaluable support that their home visitor provides. The findings from this study can be useful to home visitors and program planners as they design and discuss interventions to improve the program retention of home visiting clients.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Columbia Ballroom (CMCC upper level)
 Poster: 67

Blankenship, Kayla Hill-Chapman, Crystal Evaluation of the Perceived Benefit of a Psychiatric Resource for Parents of Children with 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome
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The objective of this study was to assess the perceived utility of an educational resource booklet addressing the psychiatric manifestations and mental health considerations within 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS) Seventy-three participants completed online surveys before and after reading the booklet. The surveys assessed personality factors and feelings of empowerment, worry, self-stigma, and ability to tolerate uncertainty. Participants reported that the booklet was easy to understand, provided better understanding of 22q11.2DS and mental illness, answered questions about mental illness associated with the condition, improved knowledge of strategies for protecting the mental health of children with the condition, led to raised confidence levels in recognizing early warning signs of mental illness, and would be helpful for other families with children affected by the condition. Participants’ feelings of empowerment increased by the end of the process while feelings of worry decreased. It was reported that the information contained in the booklet would be beneficial to receive at the timing of the diagnosis. The participants had overall high satisfaction with the booklet. Their knowledge and understanding of mental health within 22q11.2DS reportedly increased after viewing the booklet. The study results suggest a potential benefit in distributing this educational resource to other parents of children with 22q11.2DS.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Columbia Ballroom (CMCC upper level)
 Poster: 68

Lane, Dylan Peng, Xuefeng Genomic Analysis of Rhodotorula Sphaerocarpa ETNP2018 Reveals Adaptations to the Marine Environment
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The importance of marine fungi in biogeochemical cycling is intensified in extreme environmental conditions, such as those found in marine oxygen minimum zones (OMZs). OMZs are largely inhospitable for multicellular life and therefore resources are cycled primarily by microorganisms. The fungus Rhodotorula sphaerocarpa ETNP2018 was isolated from the euphotic zone (z≈40 meters) of one such environment in the Pacific Ocean at around 20° N latitude, off the coast of Mexico. Other Rhodotorula fungi are known to be aerobic heterotrophs and therefore it can be assumed that R. sphaerocarpa is as well. This experiment sought to determine the genomic adaptations which allow this strain of Rhodotorula to inhabit nutrient-limited marine environments as well as the exact mechanisms which define their carbon metabolism. To determine species specific adaptations, the genome of R. sphaerocarpa ETNP2018 was compared to those of two representative members of the genus, Rhodotorula spp. CCFEE5036 and R. mucilaginosa F6_4S_B_2B, found through the National Center for Biotechnology Information’s free assembly database. Genomic analysis determined that Rhodotorula sphaerocarpa ETNP2018 is a facultative anaerobe, adapted to its life in an oligotrophic marine environment through the utilization of multiple carbon metabolism pathways. Its anaerobic pathways include glycolysis as well as acetate fermentation and their aerobic respiration pathways operate through the Tricarboxylic Acid (TCA) Cycle and ATP synthase. It is able to continue respiration in the absence of glucose due to the presence of the protein Isocitrate Lyase in their genome, which allows R. sphaerocarpa to utilize the glyoxylate cycle, and its reported oleaginous nature which provides ample reserve energy sources. Its growth curve is characterized by a long lag phase, short exponential phase, and an extended stationary phase, during which it is proposed that carbon metabolism becomes primarily fermentative and polysaccharide storage via the biosynthesis of glycogen begins. In conclusion, we found that R. sphaerocarpa has adapted to the conditions of the Pacific OMZ by sustaining carbon metabolism under a wide array of conditions, irrespective of nutrient or oxygen supply, and suspending population growth at low cell densities in favor of stockpiling materials.

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 115

Carew, Jeremiah
Shriver, Jessica
Edwards, Hollie The answer is in the question: assessing long-term retention of learning objectives taught through simulation​
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Background: Using simulation to teach assessment and initial management of common urgent patient scenarios has been utilized at our institution with documented immediate benefit. There is no data regarding long-term clinical decision-making improvements related to this curriculum at our institution. Aims: To determine inpatient simulation’s lasting effect on intern’s decision-making, and to assess this as accurately as possible. Methods: Our project evaluated the intern class (N=13) simulation’s post-test scores immediately after the simulation as well as 3-month follow-up quizzes mirroring the post-test to establish retainment of pertinent details related to the respective simulation. In the first PDSA cycle, 3-month follow-up questions were essentially the same as those asked at the simulation. In the second PDSA cycle, wording of questions was adjusted to be more directed to the learning objectives of the simulation. The post-tests and 3-month quiz scores were compared to measure retained information concerning patient evaluation and therapeutic decision-making. Results: Initial evaluation of patients in their respective scenarios improved and was retained generally with equally high scores. Long-term retention of medication dosing was sub-optimal. Quiz content was changed in PDSA cycle two to focus on simulation learning objectives. Conclusions: The types of written questions on the post-test and follow-up quizzes may need to be more direct to not only highlight details that should be retained from simulation but to also carry over to long term memory. As we redesigned the quizzes to better focus on learning objectives, data suggests that long-term learning from simulation curriculum is adequate.

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Columbia Ballroom (CMCC upper level)
 Poster: 158

Quick, Gadison Moyer, Amanda
Cooney, Jackie
Evaluation of risk factors for valproic acid level discordance among hospitalized patients
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Valproic acid (VPA) and its derivatives exhibit high and saturable protein binding which drastically affect serum concentrations. Therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) is needed to evaluate efficacy and toxicity. VPA can be monitored by total and free serum concentrations. A free VPA level should represent approximately 10% of the total concentration. However, this percentage can vary significantly due to factors that alter protein binding like hypoalbuminemia, drug interactions, and certain endogenous substances. A free level is more accurate for TDM, however is currently underutilized in clinical practice and may be associated with higher costs. The purpose of this study is to evaluate risk factors that may lead to discordant VPA levels, better characterize VPA level monitoring in the acute care setting and establish institutional guidance for VPA monitoring. This retrospective, observational case-control study of hospitalized adult patients who had at least one simultaneously drawn total and free VPA level from January 1, 2018, through June 30, 2021, included patients categorized as cases (>15% discordance between total and free VPA levels) or controls (≤15% discordance between total and free VPA levels). Patients were evaluated for discordant risk factors, including age, serum albumin, presence of renal and/or hepatic dysfunction, and drug-drug interactions. Presence of VPA-related adverse effects were also evaluated. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were utilized to determine the relationship between patient specific factors and risk of discordance. Descriptive statistics were utilized to characterize VPA level monitoring in the acute care setting. Results are in progress at this moment

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Columbia Ballroom (CMCC upper level)
 Poster: 145

Rader, Shelby Fowler, Lauren Facilitating Conversations about Sleep between Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis and their Rheumatologist – A Potential Use of Actigraphy?
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Introduction: Poor sleep is a common complaint among patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), but few actively recognize the problem or discuss it with their rheumatologist during the clinical visit. Challenges to identification of sleep issues include a lack of standardized sleep measures used within clinical care and lack of confidence on the part of patients’ articulating how sleep is affected by RA. Clinical management is further complicated by insufficient evidence between sleep quality and disease symptomology. The objective of this study was to identify correlations between sleep measures assessed through self-report and actigraphy with disease activity for patients with RA. Methods: In a prospective, cross-sectional study, a sample of 15 participants diagnosed with RA were recruited through convenience sampling. Consenting participants self-reported sleep quality and disease activity using Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) and Routine Assessment of Patient Index Data 3 (RAPID-3). Participants’ sleep quality was also measured using actigraphy which monitors wrist movement by wearing a watch. Daily actigraphy measures of sleep efficiency, latency, and fragmentation were averaged over 6 nights. Actigraphy measures were correlated to the PSQI and RAPID-3 through Spearman correlations. Results: The sample was mostly Caucasian women with an average age of 55 years, generally reflective of the population with RA. The results demonstrated weak, nonsignificant correlations between self-reported measures of sleep and average sleep efficiency (0.12, p=0.66), latency (0.10, p=0.72), and fragmentation (-0.13, p=10). Additionally, weak, nonsignificant correlations existed between disease activity and average sleep efficiency (0.09, p=0.75), latency (0.35, p=0.19), and fragmentation (-0.12, p=65). Conclusion: This study’s implications suggest actigraphy may provide complementary information to self-reported measures of sleep. Such information may support patients’ articulation of sleep issues to the rheumatologist. Further research is necessary to understand how actigraphy measures can be effectively summarized for use by the patient and rheumatologist to discuss sleep issues during the clinical encounter as well as their ability to support clinical diagnosis of sleep disorders. Support: Prisma Health Upstate Seed Grant 2019-2020. University of South Carolina Magellan Scholar & Apprentice Programs funding Shelby Rader. Furman University Center for Engaged Learning for summer internship funding for Ava Cox.

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Columbia Ballroom (CMCC upper level)
 Poster: 151

Prescott, Meagan Schammel, Christine
Devane, Mike
Cull, John
Splenic Artery Embolization: A Non-Invasive Intervention for Blunt Splenic Injury
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Introduction/Aim: While treatment for blunt splenic injury (BSI) has historically been splenectomy, treatment has shifted toward non-operative management (NOM) to prevent consequences of an immunocompromised, asplenic state which elevates risk of life-threatening infection; however, NOM has failure rates as high as 34%. Splenic artery embolization (SAE) achieves hemostasis in BSI treatment via placement of embolic material within the proximal splenic artery (proximal SAE) or within the distal splenic artery (distal SAE) or both (combined SAE) improving success rates to 86-100%. Currently, it is unclear whether there are optimal embolization criteria for candidate selection, location, or material. Our goal was to investigate this at a single institution. Methods: A retrospective evaluation of all patients managed with SAE between 3/1/2016 and 12/31/2020 at a single institution was completed (n=91). Data were stratified by vascular injury type, BSI grade, location, and material. Patients for whom complete records were not available were excluded. It was also noted independently if the patient’s splenic injury was associated with vascular injury: active extravasation/bleeding, pseudoaneurysm, AV Fistula, or a combination. Additionally, embolization site, technique, success of embolization, abscess formation, and overall outcomes were collected and evaluated. Results: There was no difference in initial presentation when considering hemodynamic stability in ED (p=0.3418), or FAST abdominal results (p=0.7896). Presence of vascular injury (p=0.4388) and vascular injury type (p=0.093) were not different when stratifying by grade of injury. Overall, 78% of SAE were proximal, 4.4% distal and 17.6% combined. For vascular injury type, number of minor complications was significantly different between groups (p

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Columbia Ballroom (CMCC upper level)
 Poster: 84

Wienold, Natalie Grewe, Maureen Leading within the Classroom
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The University of South Carolina offers a multitude of resources for students to adjust smoothly into college during their first year. My most significant contribution to the university has been serving as a University 101 Peer Leader alongside my co-instructor. Leading a transitional class for first year students with my co-instructor has enhanced my overall college experience by providing me an opportunity to develop my communication skills and leadership skills. Through these developments, I was able to become a mentor to my students, someone they feel comfortable and confident in confiding in and asking questions. In this position, I learned to make quick, analytical decisions, interact with and lead a diverse group, and communicate and lead effectively, whether in one-on-one conversations or in large discussions. This experience confirmed that I want to help people in my future profession, and I want to do that within the legal field. This is one of various opportunities I took advantage of while attending college that have improved my abilities as a leader as well as confidence in myself that will help me as I pursue my goals after graduation.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 216

Tsai, Y. Vivian Derrick, Caroline Posaconazole-Induced Pseudohyperaldosteronism: A Case Series
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Posaconazole-induced pseudohyperaldosteronism has been recently reported as an adverse side effect associated with elevated serum concentration of posaconazole delayed-release tablets. It is suggested that the extended hydrophobic and the triazolone side chains of posaconazole allow for higher selectivity for binding within the 11β-hydroxylase and 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase. This binding then blocks cortisol conversion to inactive cortisone and leads to increased activation mineralocorticoid receptors, resulting in hypokalemia and hypertension. In addition, there is feedback inhibition which leads to reduced renin and aldosterone activity. Herein we report 3 cases of posaconazole-induced pseudohyperaldosteronism associated with the use of posaconazole delayed-release tablet.

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Columbia Ballroom (CMCC upper level)
 Poster: 109

LeClair, Rachel Cooper, Lindsey
Reihart, Layne
Impact of propranolol therapy timing on outcomes in critically ill patients with traumatic brain injury
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Purpose/Background: Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is associated with a hyperadrenergic state that can exacerbate pre-existing ischemia and metabolic crisis. Propranolol, a highly lipophilic beta-blocker that readily crosses the blood brain barrier, has been proposed in this population as it may blunt sympathetic activation associated with TBI. Studies have shown a mortality benefit with propranolol, but lack sufficient data on timing of initiation, dosing, or duration. This study aims to determine if there is a difference in outcomes between early versus late initiation of propranolol therapy in TBI patients. Methods: This is a single-center, retrospective, cohort study comparing the effectiveness of early versus late propranolol therapy initiation on outcomes in critically ill patients with TBI. Patients were identified via the trauma registry and subsequent data collection occurred via chart review. Eligible patients were those at least 18 years of age admitted to the surgical/trauma intensive care unit with traumatic brain injury who received at least 48 hours of propranolol. Patients with mild TBI were excluded. The primary endpoint is in-hospital mortality. Secondary endpoints include ICU length of stay, hospital length of stay, bradycardia incidence, indication for propranolol, and duration of continuous infusion sedation and pain medications. Results: In Progress Conclusions: In Progress

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Columbia Ballroom (CMCC upper level)
 Poster: 146

Bradley, Tyneisha Hancock, C. Nathan Identifying the location of ORF1 and TPASE proteins in Arabidopsis
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Transposable elements are DNA sequences that can move around within the genome of an organism, which can cause mutations. This project focuses on understanding the mobilization of the transposable element mPing from rice. mPing is mobilized by the ORF1 and TPase proteins from the related Ping and Pong elements. Prior protein localization results in yeast showed ORF1 appearing in the nucleus while TPase was primarily found in the cytosol, potentially acting as a mechanism to regulate transposition frequency. The goal of this project is to perform protein localization of the ORF1 and TPase proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana, a model plant. The ORF1 gene was cloned into pEarleygate104, which adds the YFP protein onto the N-terminal of ORF1 (YFP:ORF1). Similarly, TPase was cloned into pEarleygate103 to add GFP to the C-terminal of TPase (TPase:GFP). Initial separate experiments with these proteins showed YFP:ORF1 in the nucleus and TPase:GFP in the cytoplasm. However, visualization of both the a TPase:GFP and YFP:ORF fusion proteins together in the same plant was not possible due to crossover of fluorescence emission. To address this issue, we are developing a new TPase:CFP that is constructed from the pEarleygate102 plasmid. This will allow us to visualize TPase:CFP and YFP:ORF at the same time without any fluorescence crossover, providing a better understand of how these two proteins effect each other’s localization within Arabidopsis thaliana.

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 107

Fox Tran, Greyson Benton, Sarah Protecting the Health of My University: Through USC COVID-19 Testing
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Since August 2020, I have worked as a research assistant with COVID-19 testing and tracing through the University of South Carolina College of Pharmacy. I have worked for over 750 hours in this position during my undergraduate studies. I assist in setting up and breaking down testing sites, registering patients, ensuring quality and consistency of samples, answering questions about USC COVID-19 policies, keeping the sites sterilized, and delivering samples to our lab. Additionally, I have trained new staff that we hired to ensure the quality of our services. As a public health major in pursuit of medical school, this opportunity has allowed me to gain hands on clinical experience. I have trained to be HIPAA compliant, accessed electronic health records, and interacted with patients. This position has also allowed me to learn about epidemiology, contact tracing, and good public health practices. The skills I have learned and practiced through this job have greatly contributed to my pursuit of attending medical school. I hope to utilize the knowledge I have gained from this experience in my future career as a physician.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 196

Bean, Lawrence Rhodes, Morgan Implementation and analysis of a professional Continuous Glucose Monitor educational program for medical residents at a Family Medicine Clinic
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Purpose/Background: To implement a continuous glucose monitor (CGM) service in an academic family medicine residency clinic and evaluate the educational, clinical and financial impact. Methods: This was a single center, retrospective cohort study to implement a CGM service and to analyze an educational program regarding CGM use and understanding. The population in this study is the family medicine medical residents at the Prisma Health Family Medicine Center for the educational component of the study. Secondary analyses were done to look at both clinical and financial endpoints of the professional CGM clinic. For the educational portion, family medicine residents at the Prisma Health Family Medicine Center were given CGM training that included a pre-survey, an opportunity to place a personal CGM on themselves and in-person educational sessions. Residents will also complete a post-survey. The financial endpoints will include the revenue generated from the professional CGM program by the billing of CPT codes 95250 and 95251. Clinical secondary endpoints include change in A1c from baseline to post interventions. Baseline A1c is the measurement obtained prior to CGM placement, and post-intervention A1c is defined as at least 3 months after CGM removal. Data was analyzed retrospectively and included educational, clinical, and financial endpoints of the study. Results: In Progress Conclusions: In progress

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Columbia Ballroom (CMCC upper level)
 Poster: 117

York, Aly Rhodes, Morgan Evaluation of a Pharmacist-Driven Opioid Stewardship Program at a Family Medicine Clinic
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Background/Purpose: Evaluate the effect of the pharmacist-led opioid stewardship program and controlled substance policy implementation at a family medicine residency teaching clinic on prescriber adherence to CDC best practices for opioid prescribing. Methodology: This study was a retrospective chart review of patients prescribed opioid prescriptions at the Prisma Health Family Medicine Center from January 2020 to January 2022. Patients prescribed chronic opioids (any continuous use of opioid medication > 3 months) from from this practice, excluding patients who are on buprenorphine containing products for opioid use disorder, were reviewed. Prescribing practices of each physician were also completed. Prescribing practices were compared to physicians in other Prisma Health Family Medicine Group – Midlands physicians as well. Results: In Progress Conclusions: In Progress

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Columbia Ballroom (CMCC upper level)
 Poster: 118

Martinez, Alexandra Kubickova, Marketa Approaching Every Situation with an Open Heart
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Students have trouble finding resources such as counseling, diagnosis, and individualized education plans at all levels of the school system. This is exacerbated in minority students, who are already statistically overlooked when it comes to individualized resources within the classroom. Within the curriculum of education at the University of South Carolina, I learned how prevalent discrimination is. Starting at the elementary level, students of different abilities, backgrounds, and ethnicities begin to be overlooked. I decided to take what I learned in my classes and apply it to people who may have experienced this type of discrimination. Without completing my degree, it took some time to find an opportunity that was a good fit for me. Eventually, I found Open Heart Leaders; a non-profit organization geared towards helping people of color, disabled individuals, parents, and students of all backgrounds reach their full potential through mental health counseling and training sessions. As an intern, I facilitated counseling sessions for different groups each week while marketing our services in order to reach an even larger population. I completed a remote rebrand of our entire company that made our website and social media pages more accessible to those that may need it. Hearing the stories of people who came from all backgrounds spurred me on to get my degree and continue in the field of education. I gained stories of people who experienced adversity at personal and institutional levels and persevered nonetheless, which demonstrated how complex behavioral issues are. Through Open Heart Leaders, I realized that my true passion lies with education, specifically in the mental health counseling sphere in order to serve those who suffer from behavioral/mental issues and cannot advocate for themselves within the classroom. I now plan on pursuing my Master’s in Mental Health Counseling to continue a similar approach to the one I saw during my time at Open Heart Leaders. Whether I am in the classroom or working as a licensed counselor, I have an understanding of what discrimination does to the student population and can lead as an example for any future students I come across.

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 181

Brown, Haleigh Becker, Kimberly
Chu, Wendy
Is Attendance Mandatory for Therapy? Applying the REACH Treatment Engagement Framework to Examine YouTube Videos about Mental Health Services
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Low engagement in mental health services is associated with poor treatment outcomes. Disseminating comprehensive information about treatment engagement via video may facilitate higher engagement for individuals receiving mental health services. However, it remains unknown what domains of treatment engagement are discussed in widely accessible videos about mental health services. This study aimed to analyze YouTube videos to identify the engagement domains discussed in each video. Data were collected from 20 identified YouTube videos relevant to treatment engagement in mental health services. Videos were transcribed by research assistants, who were instructed to identify key messages about treatment engagement within each video. Then, messages were categorized into one of five engagement domains using a multidimensional measurement framework exemplified by the REACH acronym: Relationship (e.g., therapeutic alliance), Expectancy (e.g., beliefs treatment will be helpful), Attendance (e.g., presence at sessions), Clarity (e.g., understanding about treatment), Homework (e.g., in and out of session participation). Videos (n = 20) were on average 232.1 seconds (SD = 74.9) in duration, and each contained about 7.3 (SD = 2.9) key messages. Results revealed that the most common engagement domain discussed in the sample of videos was Expectancy (n = 19, 95%), followed by Relationship (n = 11, 55%), Clarity (n = 11, 55%), and Homework (n = 7, 35%). Only one video (5%) discussed Attendance. Of the videos, two (10%) discussed a single domain, specifically Expectancy, and the majority (n = 18, 90%) of videos discussed multiple domains (range: 2-4); though, no video discussed all five domains. Overall, the findings from this study demonstrate areas for future efforts and research regarding YouTube videos about mental health treatment engagement. Efforts in creating future videos may consider integrating content about the importance of attendance in treatment. Research may evaluate differences in unidimensional and multidimensional videos with regards to perceived impact. Given that videos are a common form of disseminating information, we believe that this line of work can enhance how treatment engagement is perceived and addressed in mental health services to improve treatment outcomes for individuals seeking mental health services.

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 66

Talib, Evan Outten, Caryn Characterization of the interaction between GRx4-Bol2 and the iron-responsive transcription factor Aft1 in Candida glabrata
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Iron is a key factor during fungal infections as the human host and invading pathogens battle over limited iron pools. The primary iron-responsive transcription factor Aft1 in the opportunistic pathogenic yeast Candida glabrata responds to iron deficiency by activating expression of iron acquisition genes. However, the mechanisms for sensing intracellular iron levels and regulating Aft1 activity in response to iron are unknown. The C. glabrata iron regulation system shares close homology to a similar system in the non-pathogenic yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, in which the monothiol glutaredoxins Grx3/4 and the BolA-like protein Bol2 form [2Fe-2S] binding complexes that deactivate Aft1 under iron replete conditions. To determine whether a similar mechanism controls C. glabrata Aft1 activity, we sought to analyze the in vitro interactions between Grx4, Bol2, and Aft1 from this yeast pathogen. We have successfully overexpressed and purified recombinant Grx4 and Bol2 alone or in complex with each other. UV-visible absorption and CD spectroscopy demonstrated that interaction of the Grx4-Bol2 complex with Aft1 is similar to our previous findings from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Surprisingly, Bol2 was also found to bind an Fe-S cluster as a homodimer form. Using this information, we are currently working on measuring the DNA binding affinity of Aft1 in the presence or absences of apo and holo Grx4-Bol2 using fluorescence polarization assays. This information may have implications for the development of prophylactic or therapeutic treatments for fungal infections.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Columbia Ballroom (CMCC upper level)
 Poster: 61

Yturralde, Kylee Chen, Elliott Brent Technique of Repair versus Nagata Auricular Reconstruction for Microtia Reconstruction: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
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Background: One in every 5,000 births are affected by microtia, but there is no consensus on a gold standard technique for autogenous repair. In this study, we compare two common methods – the Brent and Nagata autogenous costal cartilage reconstruction techniques. A systematic review of the literature and a quantitative meta-analysis to compare the outcomes of these approaches were performed. Outcomes analyzed included rates of infection, necrosis, cartilage exposure, cartilage resorption, hematoma, wire extrusion, and hypertrophic scar. Methods: One researcher executed a PubMed and Medline database systematic review with the following keywords: microtia, Brent, and Nagata. Case reports, studies including data for other techniques, and articles without original data or patient outcomes were excluded. Prevalence of outcomes for each study was analyzed through meta-analysis of proportions using Stata. Results: 536 potential studies were located with basic search terms. 12 studies met inclusion criteria. 4 studies utilized the Brent method of repair including 563 microtic ears. 9 studies implemented the Nagata technique including 2304 microtic ears. 2 studies analyzed Brent (327 ears) versus Nagata (471 ears). The rate and 95% confidence intervals were calculated. Infection of wound site rate was 0.01 (95% CI: 0.00-0.03) for Brent and 0.03 (95% CI: 0.00-0.12) for Nagata. Necrosis of reconstruction site rate was 0.00 (95% CI: 0.00-0.03) for Brent and 0.04 (95% CI: 0.00-0.10) for Nagata. Cartilage exposure rate was 0.01 (95% CI:0.00-0.02) for Brent and 0.03 (95% CI: 0.00-0.09) for Nagata. Cartilage resorption rate was 0.01 (95% CI: 0.00-0.04) for Brent and 0.05 (95% CI: 0.02-0.09) for Nagata. Hematoma rate was 0.01 (95% CI: 0.00-0.05) for Brent and 0.01 (95% CI: 0.01-0.02) for Nagata. Wire extrusion was not mentioned for any Brent, but the rate was 0.08 (95% CI: 0.05-0.12) in Nagata. Only one study for Brent (rate of 0.03) and Nagata (rate of 0.10) reported hypertrophic scars. There were no statistically significant differences in complication rates between the Brent and Nagata microtic reconstruction techniques identified in this study. Conclusion: The Brent and Nagata microtia reconstruction techniques have no difference in risk of infection, necrosis, cartilage exposure, cartilage resorption, hematoma, wire extrusion, or hypertrophic scars.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Columbia Ballroom (CMCC upper level)
 Poster: 137

Utter, Taylor Ismail, Briahnna Values Will Change over Time
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The summer after my freshman year, I worked at the University of South Carolina (UofSC) as an Orientation Leader. In this position, I represented UofSC and shared Gamecock pride with over 6,500 incoming students and 5,000 family members. Additionally, I facilitated groups of 20-30 students to teach them about the university, campus resources, and community expectations. Through that, I interacted with a variety of individuals from different backgrounds and experiences with different outlooks on life. As part of the Carolina Core requirements, I took PHIL 213: Communicating Moral Issues. A module in this course covered important values and lessons to carry throughout one’s life to be most successful and happy. Each student was asked to give a speech on their family’s most important values to share with the class. Through this assignment, I learned to appreciate the values my peers shared and understand how and why they were where they were in life. Through this classroom experience and reflecting on my experience as an Orientation Leader for UofSC, I learned how to develop valuable connections with others through both compromise and communication. Participating in both these experiences taught me that just because your values may change over time and may differ from another person, it does not mean you should avoid them in fear of conflict or incompatibility. Additionally, the experiences gave me the tools to cultivate these special connections.

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 224

Connell, Katharine Pou, Jay Cool with Community Service: My Experience in Atlanta Georgia
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In Atlanta, GA and through the Leadership and Service Center on campus, I was able to serve alongside fellow students in low-SES communities. We volunteered for our spring break with Cool Girls, Inc., which is an after-school program for girls in historically low-SES public school districts, as well as at a YMCA after-school space for kids to go to in the greater Atlanta area. Half of our work was behind the scenes, and the other half was direct interactions with students, teachers, and community members. Each day we were able to reflect on our experiences as a group. From this experience, I learned a lot about how low-SES families’ circumstances can often continue generationally.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 159

Davis, Sarah Zhu, Jun Deciphering the impact of HIV-1 on dopamine signaling
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HIV-1 associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) impacts ~50% of the 37 million people infected with HIV-1 worldwide. Dysregulation of dopamine (DA) signaling is a critical mediating factor for the development of HIV-1 HAND, as evidenced by neurodegeneration of dopaminergic neurons, increased viral load in response to DA, and decreased expression of the dopamine transporter (DAT). Using combined computational modeling, mutagenesis, and in vivo approaches, our lab has characterized the HIV-1 protein transactivator of transcription (Tat) as a negative allosteric modulator for DAT. Using the electrochemical analytical technique fast scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) we found that acute expression of the Tat protein increases extracellular DA in inducible transgenic mice (iTat-tg). Using pharmacological assays in conjunction with FSCV, my research aims to delineate the role of monoamine transporters in the molecular mechanism underlying Tat-induced increases in extracellular DA. Specifically, my project is focused on the roles of DAT and the vesicular monoamine transporter (VMAT-2). Additionally, my work aims to characterize the impact of HIV-1 infection and methamphetamine (meth) abuse on DA signaling and behavior outcomes. Meth usage is highly prevalent among HIV-1 infected persons, contributing to worsened disease state and HAND outcomes. The findings from these studies will contribute to our understanding of the impact of both HIV-1 and meth on DA signaling, with the potential of identifying drug targets for future pharmacological treatments in HAND and meth abuse.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Pastides Alumni Center Ballroom 1b
Time: 9:45 

Bouknight, Abigail Bookstaver, Nicole Integration of pharmacy interns in the ambulatory care setting of a large health-system
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Title: Integration of pharmacy interns in the ambulatory care setting of a large health-system Authors: Abigail Bouknight, Nicole Bookstaver Presentation Objective: Assess the integration of pharmacy interns in the ambulatory care setting Self-Assessment Question: What are the benefits of integrating pharmacy interns in the ambulatory care setting? Self-Assessment Question Answer: Complete internship hours requirements from professional PharmD program, provide exposure to ambulatory care early in pre-pharmacy or professional degree program, provide valuable work to ambulatory clinics, Purpose/Background: In addition to didactic and experiential hours, professional pharmacy school programs require PharmD candidates to complete a designated amount of internship hours prior to successfully completing their program. Historically, these intern hours are provided through positions in community pharmacies and acute care hospitals. To date, there are no robust ambulatory care internship programs that satisfy these requirements in a local institution. Pharmacy student involvement within the ambulatory care setting is not a new concept. Free-clinics and health education campaigns are among the many initiatives pharmacy students across the United States champion. The purpose of this study is to integrate pharmacy students into the ambulatory setting for their own professional development, as well as act as an extender to the ambulatory clinical pharmacy staff, which may ultimately improve productivity. Methods: Both pre-pharmacy and professional pharmacy students from local college of pharmacies were notified of this unique, unpaid internship opportunity in the ambulatory care setting. Interns selected were on-boarded through the student affairs office prior to being assigned to a longitudinal project with ambulatory care pharmacists. Longitudinal projects were non-time sensitive and submitted by clinical ambulatory care pharmacists and included medication use evaluations, medication access programs, and medication adherence reports. Interns will work on projects approximately 5-10 hours per week, with bi-weekly check-ins. Given the prospective nature of this study, the anticipated bi-weekly metrics tracked will include confirmation of completed tasks by interns, assessment of presumed productivity increase by ambulatory clinical pharmacists, and discuss professional development of the intern. Results: In progress Conclusions: In progress

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Columbia Ballroom (CMCC upper level)
 Poster: 95

Gregory, Taylor Dodson, Cortney
Kohn, Joseph
Evaluation of the Legionella Urinary Antigen on Azithromycin Discontinuation
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Background/Purpose: Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is a leading cause of death and hospitalization in the United States. Legionella urinary antigens (LUA) can aid in the discontinuation of unwarranted macrolide therapy. Current guidelines recommend obtaining a LUA only in the context of known association with an outbreak, recent travel, or a diagnosis of severe CAP. This study aimed to describe how LUAs are utilized at a single academic medical center. Methodology: This was a single center, retrospective cohort study that included adult patients admitted to Prisma Health Richland for CAP, and who received at least 1 dose of azithromycin between January 1, 2018, and July 31, 2021. Patients were stratified based on those that continued azithromycin therapy versus those that did not in the event of a negative LUA. The primary endpoint was the rate of azithromycin discontinuation. Secondary endpoints included the use of a respiratory pathogen panel, days of azithromycin use, ICU and hospital length of stay, and LUA utilization pre- and post- the beginning of COVID-19 pandemic. Results: In progress Conclusions: In progress

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Columbia Ballroom (CMCC upper level)
 Poster: 103

Bouali, Hadi Lavigne, John J. 3D Organic Molecular Cage
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This project focuses on synthesizing and characterizing a porous, conjugated, 3D Covalent Organic Framework (COF). Organic polymer layers are of interest in many facets of technology, including OLED lights, foldable phones, and solar cells, to be used as a more efficient conductive electrical component than metal polymers. These organic polymer layers are crystalline, porous structures that are functionally versatile, and even more so when created in a 3D structure. The problem with existing 3D COFs is they contain sp3 hybridized carbons which have diamond-like geometry, which prevents conjugation and semi-conductivity by not allowing for π-orbital overlap throughout the system. To allow for semi-conductivity, conjugation of the whole polymer along with a proposed 3D conformation can be incorporated to yield unhybridized p-orbitals (sp2-sp hybridization) in which electrons can be delocalized. The permanent porosity of the COFs allows for doping, where one of many electron-rich or electron-deficient guests can be put into the pores of the conjugated COF to fine-tune conductivity. For the purposes of this project, a conjugated “molecular cage” will be the monomer building block to form the 3D conjugated COF (ConCOF). The ConCOF can be constructed utilizing Dynamic Covalent Chemistry (DCvC) which employs reversible bonding processes and thermodynamically favorable self-assembly of the ConCOF from its molecular cage monomers.

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 136

Watts, Weston Brookins, Philip Uncertainty and Common Pool Resources
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This project explores the effects of group and resource size uncertainty in a common pool resource (CPR) environment using a game theoretic approach. The question this project seeks to answer is: How will people behave when we relax common knowledge assumptions in a basic common pool resource (CPR) environment. We vary uncertainty about (1) the number of players and (2) the size of the resource. We use a game theoretic model to describe how people behave in these sorts of situations and the correlation between uncertainties in both resource and group size and "harvesting" behavior, that is, how much people will take from the resource. This project will help determine how people behave when they do not know how many other people are utilizing a common pool resource nor the size of the resource itself. The answers to these questions have a variety of applications in managing common pool resources. For example, knowing how fishermen change their fishing habits when they have different degrees of knowledge about the sizes of the fish and fishermen populations can help to determine if there is a correlation between uncertainty and overfishing.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 12

Barber, Jacob Sarzynski, Mark Proteomic and Metabolomic Signatures of Plasma Triglyceride-Related Trait Responses to Regular Exercise
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Abstract Text

Introduction: Elevated plasma triglycerides (TG) are associated with risk of cardiovascular disease and are modifiable through lifestyle interventions such as regular exercise. However, TG responses to regular exercise are characterized by significant inter-individual differences. Hypothesis: We hypothesized that baseline levels of circulating proteins and metabolites are associated with TG response to exercise and can predict exercise-induced changes in plasma TG traits. Methods: We measured circulating proteins (n=4979 proteins) and metabolites (n=300) in 650 Black and White adults of the HERITAGE Family Study who completed 20 weeks of exercise training and had complete data on TG traits. We investigated two TG-related traits that significantly improved with training: fasting TG and large TG-rich lipoprotein particle concentration (LTRLP). The association between baseline analyte values and exercise-induced changes in TG traits were examined using linear mixed models adjusted for age, sex, race, BMI, baseline trait value, and the random effect of family membership. Significance was determined as FDR

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Columbia Ballroom (CMCC upper level)
 Poster: 47

Rapaport, Madeline Ismail, Briahnna Peer-to-Peer Learning Fosters Community
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Three years ago, I decided on a whim to apply to be a Peer Consultant in the Student Success Center. All I really knew going in is that this position dealt with helping other students in the university reach their full academic potential, which is something that I highly value. Throughout the last few years, I have learned that this role is so much more than that. Through my one-on-one meetings with students to assist them with time management and organization, I have grown immensely in my communication, empathy and problem-solving skills. The students I have the opportunity to help in this position come from all different backgrounds and view the definition of success in many different ways. I have gained the ability to put myself in someone else's shoes and approach each meeting with the willingness to adapt my own strategies to best fit their needs. I have learned that oftentimes, these students have immense potential to thrive, but just need someone to really listen to their individual struggles and help build a plan for success that is specific to them. This experience has given me the opportunity to engage and build connections with people from all parts of the UofSC community and allowed me to grow in my compassion. This past semester I was selected to be a co-instructor for a cohort of new Peer Leaders in the Student Success Center. I am so honored to be able to share my experiences and help this new class of leaders develop the skills to be the best resources to their peers. This experience has been such a vital part of my college experience and I know I will be able to utilize the leadership and effective communication skills I learned as I begin my professional career in public relations.

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 200

DiFrisco, Madison Michalos, Alexis How Peer Leadership Enriched My College Experience and Led to Personal and Professional Growth
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Abstract Text

The first-year experience at University of South Carolina is truly unmatched due to the commitment to first-year students inside the University 101 classroom. My most significant experience at the University of South Carolina was serving as a peer leader for University 101. As a freshman, I was very connected to my University 101 class and was motivated to be a peer leader because of how the class impacted me in such a positive way. During my time as a peer leader though I was on the other side of University 101 teaching a classroom full of first-year students, I learned a lot about myself too. I grew tremendously as a leader, and ultimately decided that I want to pursue education after college. I learned that communication skills are at the forefront of being a good leader. My presentation will discuss the positive impact that the University 101 experience has on freshmen students as well as the impact that peer leadership had on my senior year, specifically shaping me into an individual excited about my future post-graduation.

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 172

Lomas, Madison Grewe, Maureen Nursing Clinical Rotations as The Foundation of Student Learning, Success, and Drive: How Time in The Hospital Inspires Future Nurses To-Be.
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As a nursing student, I discover new passions through my learning in the classroom and in my hands-on experiences in the hospital every semester. The one thing I have grown to become most passionate about is my time in the clinical setting. Clinical rotations give me the opportunity to not only learn new skills as a future nurse, but also how to become more empathetic, compassionate, and a better communicator and leader for all populations and people of all ages. Through clinical rotations, I am able to connect with patients beyond a textbook case study and learn from them and their health experiences all while they are able to learn from me as a caregiver as well. During clinicals, I work with the primary nurse and my clinical preceptor to determine my patient’s priority concepts in relation to their health problems in order to find the best interventions to prevent complications and optimize their health. We implement these interventions as a team and assess patient responses to form a complete evaluation and observe their impact on the overall outcome. I am passionate about clinicals because these days test my strength both mentally and physically, allow my brain to think more critically and abstractly, and give me the chance to truly change the lives of others around me. You never know what patient or health problem you are going to work with that day, so you must be prepared to approach the day with optimism, positivity, clarity, and patience in order to make these hours in the clinical setting truly count. My time in the clinical setting has driven my passion for nursing and has driven me to aspire to be the best nurse, co-worker, caretaker, and student possible so that I can soak up every experience I am given and use this time to one day inspire positive change no matter my atmosphere or environment.

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 162

Sottak, Savannah Ismail, Briahnna Growth Through Experiential Learning
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During my Junior year at UofSC, COVID-19 forced most classes to go online, which encouraged me to pursue a different type of learning: experiential learning. As a political science major, I was leaning towards law school after graduation. To ensure that I really wanted to commit to this, I got a job as a legal assistant back home in the Turks and Caicos Islands while all of my classes were online. While I learned the ins and outs of actually practicing law, the types of cases I worked on possibly aged me; medical negligence, fraud, and even a murder trial turned me into a paranoid, pessimistic person. Even so, it was one of the best experiences of my life and properly prepared me for a career - any career - after college. Stepping away from the theoretical and getting real-life experience helped sharpen my ideas of what sort of career I want and how best to achieve it. This is something that I think everyone should do while in University; even if you are not sure what you want to do after graduation, the best way and time to explore your interests is now. I have decided to take a year before applying to law school to continue my experiential learning. Experiential learning provides students with a deeper understanding of their chosen area of study and career path as well as helps develop practical skills desired by future employers.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 221

Almutairi, Abdullah White, Lourie The Effect of Pacemakers on Patients with Heart Failure
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A cardiac pacemaker is a medical device that sends electrical impulses to the heart muscle chambers, causing them to contract and pump blood. This research analyzes the effectiveness of pacemakers in relation to patients who have heart failure and whether it is helpful to enhance their lifespan. In the last few years, medical experts have focused on the use of pacemakers as one of the most effective ways of helping patients with heart failure. As a result, the main objective of this study is on the positive and negative aspects of using this medical technology. The research approach involved focusing on published research articles that outline the outcome of patients who have used pacemakers. We explored the effects of these devices on patient survival rates and health outcomes All the research articles used in the research have included primary data which was collected from patients who have used pacemakers extensively. Additionally, the data from the patients have been statistically examined to determine the positive or negative effect of the pacemakers on the affected individuals. In conclusion, this research indicates that the use of pacemakers has a positive effect on patients who have heart failure, as pacemakers are contributed to increased lifespans and the benefits outweigh the negative effects. From a health perspective, this research outlines the importance of the adoption of the latest pacemaker technology by patients with heart failure issues. This device enables their hearts to function normally, allowing them to proceed with their lives without any disruptions. Research in the future should focus on the underlying health conditions that can affect the working of pacemakers, which may lead to a reduction of their effectiveness. Keywords: Pacemakers, positive effects, health outcomes, patients.

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 35

Hutto, Sully Reinhardt, Sara Teaching Tactfulness
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Abstract Text

I first served as a Peer Leader for University 101 as a junior in the Fall of 2021. As a U101 Peer Leader, I was responsible for serving the freshmen class in the roles of mentor, resource, and facilitator. Through assisting my co-instructor with creating relevant and challenging lesson plans, being fully present with my students both inside and outside the classroom, and exhibiting vulnerability about my experiences as a Gamecock, I was able to build a tight knit community of Baby Gamecocks in my classroom. Beyond that, the skills of tact, leadership, and communication were boldly refined within me as a result of this experience. I was able to collaborate with and learn from other Peer Leaders through the process, work hand in hand with my co-instructor, and build rapport with each of my students in a different way, which in turn resulted in all of those individuals having countless impacts on me. I walked into my experience as a Peer Leader unsure of myself and my abilities, and I closed the door on my classroom for the last time as a student, friend, and mentor that felt infinitely more sure of her abilities to guide difficult conversations, help others bear sensitive and personal matters, and build community than when she opened that door for the first time. The skills that being a University 101 Peer Leader afforded me will launch my career in the helping field off to a grounded and successful start, giving me an already full toolbox of helping, communication, and leadership skills to which I can add for the rest of my personal and professional life.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 225

Kelly, Katherine Crouch, Elizabeth Examining the influence of positive childhood experiences on childhood overweight and obesity
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Positive childhood experiences (PCEs) promote healthy social development, improve overall wellness, and help to moderate and prevent exposure to adverse childhood experiences. There has been limited research examining the association between positive childhood experiences and overweight or obesity status in children. The purpose of this study was to examine whether experiencing positive childhood experiences are associated with lower rates of overweight or obesity status in children between 10 and 17 years of age, using cross-sectional data from the 2018–2019 National Survey of Children's Health (n = 28,771), a nationally representative mail and online survey. Frequencies, proportions, and unadjusted associations for each variable were calculated using descriptive statistics and bivariate analyses. To examine the association between overweight or obesity and PCEs, multivariable regression models were used. Compared to children who were underweight or had a healthy weight, children who were overweight or obese were less likely to: participate after school activities (78.1%, p

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Columbia Ballroom (CMCC upper level)
 Poster: 132

Golden, Kennedy Raynor, Phyllis Exploring Religiosity, Perceived Mental Health, and Coping Behaviors of Undergraduate African American College Students During the Covid-19 Pandemic
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African-Americans (AA) have the highest severity of untreated mental illness compared to any other racial group (Dempsey et al., 2016). AA who seek mental health treatment from trained clinicians are often perceived within their community to be “crazy” or “emotionally weak” (Williams & Justice, 2010). Others believe that seeking professional help for emotional problems is a sign of low levels of faith in God or spiritual weakness in one’s life (Payne, 2008). When combined with the circumstances arising from the COVID-19 pandemic, students face new challenges in the pathway to effectively cope with mental health difficulties. The aim of this thesis is to explore the relationships of religious practice and religious activity on the perceived mental health and coping of undergraduate AA college students. We aim to better understand the mechanisms of coping that AA college students employ, and examine the effect of the changing social environment, religion, and cultural stigma on overall mental health. Participants were recruited online solely from a predominantly African American chat group on GroupMe, a group messaging app frequently utilized by college students. The Brief-Cope tool was used and modified to include demographic questions and a question asking participants to rank their overall mental health. Participants were ranked their overall mental health score as Excellent (1), Very good (2), Good (3), Fair (4), or Poor (4). Results indicated that 12.2% rated their mental health as “Excellent”, 20.6% as “Very good”, 30.1% as “Good” , 27.5% as “Fair”, and 7.3% as “Poor”. There was a positive correlation between increased religious activity and overall mental health score (r=0.30, p-value = 0.0006). Those who specified their practiced religion as “Other” had a comparably lower total mental health score than other religion options. Cultural mental health stigma is a very prominent factor that can influence how college students choose to rank their overall mental health, and which coping measures they feel comfortable disclosing or relying upon in everyday life. Additionally, there may be other circumstantial factors that influence individual mental health status outside of what was discussed including social health determinants.

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 43

Shea, Daniel Gavin, Michael
Dubinsky, Stanley
Language Conflict and Ethnolinguistic Marginalization in Uzbekistan
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Abstract Text

The research in this presentation explores the interaction between Russian and Uzbek language in Uzbekistan, and examines how the conflict evolved towards its current status. Uzbekistan has been independent since 1991, but was occupied by Russia for over a century before under various governments. Due to the steady presence of a Russian population in the country and a series of Soviet language programs, the Uzbek language was repressed for decades preceding independence, and with it the ethnic identities of its speakers (Fierman 1991) . In the early 1860s, the vast Central Asian territory previously referred to as Turkestan was conquered by Russian forces through the capture of cities such as Bukhara and Tashkent, the capital of modern Uzbekistan. The perceived inferiority of non-Russian languages by elites led to the normalization of Russian as the primary language for public discourse. This power dynamic was further reinforced by the arrival of the Soviet Union, through a series of Stalinist language construction projects that separated and altered Turkic languages in the area. (Fierman 1991). In the 1990’s newly independent Uzbekistan aimed to encourage revitalization of both Uzbek language and ethnic identity, and the new constitution of Uzbekistan required that comprehensive language education would be provided for both Uzbek and Russian (Uzbekistan 1992). Due to this shift, Russian speakers felt increasingly disconnected with the Russian influence that once dominated the Uzbek socio-political landscape (Karimzad, Farzad, and Catedral 2018). The most recent development in the conflict was a 2020 draft law proposing that officials must conduct public business in Uzbek at risk of receiving fines for noncompliance. This garnered backlash both from Russians within the country and in the Foreign Affairs Ministry in Moscow (Tolipov 2020). The purpose of this research is to write an encyclopedia entry for the online Language Conflict Project. The entry includes a synopsis of the conflict as well as a historical and linguistic background, and stories pertaining to the conflict’s development. The entry will contribute to a larger body of work that studies and categorizes many more examples in the interest of better understanding the causes and effects of linguistic conflict.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 5

Zhang, Ran
Aghaei, Atefeh
Qiao, Shan Impact of persistent COVID-19 symptoms on social life of female long haulers
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Persistent COVID-19 symptoms (long COVID) may bring numerous challenges to long haulers' social lives. Women may have to endure more profound impacts given their social roles and existing structural inequality. This study aims to explore the impacts of long COVID on various aspects of social life among female long haulers. Semi-structured interviews were conducted online via Zoom meetings between April and June 2021 with fifteen female long haulers in the United States, who were purposely recruited from Facebook groups, Slack groups, and organization websites. The interviews were audio recorded after appropriate consent and transcribed verbatim. The interview data were managed and thematically analyzed using MAXQDA software. Persistent COVID-19 symptoms negatively affected female long haulers’ social lives in many aspects including physical function, financial security, social relationship, conflict of social roles, and social stigma. Physical limitations changed their body image. Social isolation and work-family conflicts caused huge stress. They experienced internalization of stigma and job insecurities. Shifting to new methods of communication, especially social media may buffer the negative effects of social isolation because of long COVID. Existing policies and intervention programs need to be adapted to address the challenges and barriers that long haulers face in returning to normal social life, especially for females. Tailored social life-related recommendations and social support are needed for female long haulers.

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Pastides Alumni Center Ballroom 1b
Time: 1:20 

Orr, Stephanie Lewis, Elise Redefining the Role: Leveraging Individual Strengths to Construct Unique Leadership Positions
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Sport clubs provide students with an opportunity to remain physically active, meet other students with shared interests, and provide an outlet for leadership and growth. My most significant contribution to the University of South Carolina has been my time developing the sport club community at the university. Becoming a member of Gamecock Club Swimming greatly impacted my college career by serving as a foundation to grow socially, as an individual, and as a leader. Serving as Gamecock Club Swimming President, I expected to develop my communication and leadership skills. However, alongside those attributes I also learned how to think critically and creatively, have the confidence to expand the system, and collaborate with a diverse group of people. My presentation will discuss the intuition I’ve gained through my experience Club Sports at the University of South Carolina has influenced my college experience and my growth as an individual.

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 248

Geisler, Rachel Benton, Sarah Study Abroad Experience in Florence, Italy
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During my Fall 2021 semester, I had the opportunity to study abroad in Florence, Italy. At USC, my major is Retailing, with a concentration titled Fashion Merchandising, and a minor in Event Management. In Florence, I took courses in Fashion Forecasting, Consumer Behavior and Retail Strategies, Creative Advertising of Italian Destinations, and Grow Green and Learn Italian. I also participated in experiential learning experiences by completing shifts at the school restaurant, pastry shop, and vintage boutique. To maximize my time while abroad, I had the opportunity to travel to other countries and cities on the weekends. The semester before going abroad, I gained a particular interest and passion for Italian craftsmanship and design in luxury fashion through my job at a local boutique. Through experiential learning opportunities and class visits to local designers and small business owners, I gained an increased appreciation for the fashion industry in Italy. In my Fashion Forecasting for Merchandisers course, I learned a lot about fashion history and how to predict fashion trends. This course made me realize that I want to pursue a career in fashion forecasting in the future. I also learned about new concepts such as tourism marketing for Italy and the importance of community gardens for Italian communities. In my travels outside of Italy, I was able to apply my studies about tourism and learn how other countries rely on it. I could not have imagined how much my study abroad experience would enrich my college experience and add to my passion for my major. I want to inspire others to study abroad by highlighting some key moments from my study abroad experience. I plan on using the information learned in my experience in Florence in my future career and endeavors. I also hope to come back to Florence and possibly even pursue a master’s degree.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 155

Messina, Carolyn Wellman, Denise The Riverbanks Zoo & Garden Aquarium Internship
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The summer of 2021, I had an internship at the Riverbanks Zoo & Garden in their aquarium department. I was responsible for a multitude of animal husbandry duties including things such as preparing and feeding out diets, cleaning exhibits both inside and out, ensuring proper water chemistry parameters through testing procedures, and helping to monitor the animals of the Aquarium collection through detailed observations. I completed this internship because I am a marine science major and I potentially want to work in an aquarium once I graduate. Throughout my internship, I learned about the hard work and commitment it takes to be responsible for the lives of countless animals. I also learned about how important teamwork and respect for other aquarists, as well as people in other departments is vital to making the zoo community functional. This is a lesson that I will take into all aspects of my life that will help make me a more valuable member of the community. I learned how to work with a group of people with different priorities and ideas to accomplish many things. This is a useful skill for anyone to have and will help me in my future community service endeavors. I plan on taking these lessons into every future job and interaction to help me act as effectively as possible to accomplish different things. These are lessons everyone should learn.

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 247

Maile, Rachel Mousseau, Timothy The Successes and Pitfalls: Deep Learning Effectiveness in a Chernobyl Field Camera Trap Application
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Camera traps have become a popular in-situ sensor for collecting information on animal abundance and occupancy estimates. The ability of field camera traps to be deployed over a large habitat extent with minimal anthropological disturbance and expense has become ideal for measuring the health of an ecosystem, particularly in unstable ones where there have been nuclear accidents. However, manually sorting through field camera trap imagery is extremely time and labor intensive. Due to this, many studies have started to employ the use of deep learning tools, such as convolutional neural networks (CNNs). For the purposes of this study, we examined specific factors pertinent to camera trap locations that may influence the accuracy metrics of a CNN that has been trained with a small set of images. False negatives and false positives may occur due to a variety of reasons, including local weather patterns and degree of light present. Following an application of Duggan et al. on our Chernobyl study site, we explored the deficiencies of utilizing fewer images and the factors necessary to consider when implementing CNN architectures in field camera trap imagery. Camera traps recorded temperature, and visual precipitation and daylight were noted. Wind speed and cloud cover data were collected from World Weather Online. We trained the model to detect 16 different object classes across 9,576 images from camera traps placed in the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone. After analyzing wind speed, cloud cover, and temperature, there was a significant correlation with model error and temperature but not with wind speed and cloud cover. Furthermore, we found that the model had a greater number of successes when images were taken during the day and when precipitation was not present. Given the relationship between the influencing variables studied and model error rates, these factors may apply to other camera trap identification and classification models.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 113

Mundok, Allen Shorter, Kimberly Does a 2x Dose of Different Vitamin B12 Forms Affect Tau Phosphorylation and Expression of Proteins That Regulate Tau Phosphorylation?
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Vitamin B12 consumption has been increasing since the mid-1990s after the fortification of grains with folic acid and Vitamin B12. As consumption of Vitamin B12 has increased, prevalence of Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) has also increased. In 2020, 1 in 54 children in the U.S. was diagnosed with ASD. Individuals with ASD commonly possess a mutation in methyltetrahydrofolate reductase enzyme (MTHFR). This mutation leads to a loss of folic acid metabolism to a one-carbon methyl group in the cell. ASD is now known to have both genetic and epigenetic components. Loss of MTHFR function seen in ASD patients likely changes Vitamin B12 usage and affects epigenetics. Therefore, excess Vitamin B12 may affect gene expression. As a result, we investigated the effects of 3 Vitamin B12 forms: +2 Cobalt cyanocobalamin, +3 Cobalt cyanocobalamin, and cobamamide at a 2x dose, with and without a knockdown of MTHFR expression, on gene expression of several kinases involved in phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of Tau. Using a neurobiological model, the SHSY5Y cell, we hypothesized increased Tau phosphorylation for the +3 Cobalt cyanocobalamin and Cobamamide forms and hypothesized that the +2 Cobalt cyanocobalamin would have no effect on Tau phosphorylation, based on previous findings in the lab.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 86

Worrell, Faith Pou, Jay Understanding NFL Communications, the Patriot Way
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During the summer before my senior year of college, I was the New England Patriots' Communications Associate and their first ever photography intern. My daily activities including sorting photo archives, compiling clip reports, and assisting the photo editor and public relations staff. While in New England, I learned how to keep up creatively and professionally in the fast-paced environment of the National Football League under the expectations set by Robert Kraft. The message given in orientation was to conduct yourself as if you were an owner to facilitate bringing your best effort to work every day. Whether I was photographing practice, designing graphics, or handing out credentials to the media, I made sure to represent not only myself but the Patriots professionally and responsibly. As an intern I spent a lot of time overseeing the media work room and press box, which meant I was the first line of help for anyone needing directions or instructions during practices and preseason. I found that prioritizing little things like giving cold waters to tired photographers on a hot summers’ day was a good way to show I and the organization cared about their wellbeing as a person. My boss, Stacey James, always instilled in our staff that players, coaches, media and fans are most importantly human beings that deserve to be treated well and with respect when visiting Gillette Stadium. This job meant the world to me, not only because of the exciting resume booster it is, but because of the professional sports values and techniques I learned from the high standards implemented in New England.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 234

Rougelot, Emily Morris, Caleb Cultivation of Personal Growth and Passions
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Abstract Text

As a Psychology major and counseling minor I have a passion for helping others, especially in the mental health field. My time at The University of South Carolina has provided guidance and inspiration in order to pursue a career in the mental health and counseling fields. My experiences within the university have shaped me to be a better listener and a more confident person all while cultivating the desire to help others. In order to gain more experience in the mental health field I worked as a SAPE (substance abuse and prevention) peer leader on campus. In doing this I shadowed counseling sessions in the STIR office as well as facilitated meetings and presentations with my peers in the campus community. As a SAPE peer leader I encouraged healthy habits both in and out of the campus environment. In doing this I learned that there are a variety of perspectives when caring for mental health. As I was faced with challenges, I was pushed out of my comfort zone, further inspiring me to be a more open and confident individual. Ultimately my experiences within the University of South Carolina and as a SAPE Peer leader taught me the importance of adapting and honing in on personal passions, all while staying true to yourself and your goals. As I end my college career and enter this next chapter, I will be taking these lessons with me in order to become the best mental health practitioner I can be.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 185

Gregory, Katherine Steck, Susan
Zhao, Longgang
Eberth, Jan
Felder, Tisha
Murphy, Angela
Proportion of Cancer Survivors in the United States Who Are Meeting Healthy Lifestyle Guidelines
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Abstract Text

Objectives: We aimed to determine the proportion of cancer survivors who are following each of five health behavior guidelines recommended by the American Cancer Society (ACS), including consuming fruits and vegetables at least 5 times per day, maintaining a body mass index (BMI) <30kg/m2, engaging in 150 minutes or more of physical activity weekly, not currently smoking, and not excessively drinking alcohol. Design: Cross-sectional analysis using data from the 2019 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS). Methods and Instruments: A total of 42,727 survey respondents who reported a previous diagnosis of cancer other than skin cancer were included in the analyses. Prevalence with 95% confidence intervals (95%CI) were estimated for the five lifestyle-related factors accounting for BRFSS’ complex survey design. Statistical analyses were performed using R statistical software. Results: The prevalence of cancer survivors who were meeting ACS guidelines was 15.1% (95%CI:14.3%, 15.9%) for recommended fruit and vegetable intake; 66.8% (95%CI: 65.9%, 67.7%) for BMI <30 kg/m2; 51.1% (95%CI: 50.1%, 52.1%) for recommended physical activity; 84.9% (95%CI: 84.1%, 85.7%) for not currently smoking; and 89.5% (95%CI: 88.8%, 90.3%) for not drinking excessive alcohol. Conclusions: While the majority of cancer survivors met the guidelines for smoking and alcohol drinking, almost half were not engaging in recommended physical activity levels and a large majority had inadequate fruit and vegetable intake. Additional programs and counseling may be needed to support cancer survivors in adopting and maintaining healthy lifestyle habits, especially for physical activity and fruit and vegetable intake.

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 48

Hanna, Brandon
Rice, Garrison
Schwarz, McKenzie
Rhodes, Morgan
Foster, Zoe
A Didactic and Simulation Curriculum for Sport Event Coverage
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Abstract Text

Introduction: Didactics alone are not an optimal form of education for skill-based competencies such as sideline coverage. Currently, there are no guidelines for education of family medicine residents on common evaluations performed during sideline coverage that is a requirement for residency education. Method: The aim was to develop curriculum for sideline coverage in a family medicine residency, developed by residents interested in sports medicine, under guidance of sports and family medicine faculty. The curriculum was evaluated with a voluntary survey of residents before and after each component to assess comfort with sideline coverage and injuries, with a unique identifier to link pre/post surveys. Results: The curriculum was implemented in the 2021-2022 academic year, consisting of a lecture, practicum, and simulation lab developed by a PGY2 and PGY3 resident. The lecture and practicum were conducted in July 2021, covering roles/responsibilities of team members on the sidelines, common sideline diagnoses, and knee/ankle exam. The simulation occurred in Dec 2021 and included scenarios on heat illness, sudden cardiac death, and exercise collapse associated with sickle cell trait. Residents were surveyed before the curriculum and after the didactic/practicum in July and Nov 2021. Before the curriculum, about 30% of responses reported understanding of a team physician and athletic trainer's role. Roughly 30% of residents reported confidence in their ability to treat concussion/spinal injuries, while about 40% reported confidence in treating heat-related illnesses. Over 50% felt confident treating cardiopulmonary illness on the sideline. Curriculum evaluation via resident surveys is ongoing. Conclusions: Implementing a resident-led curriculum for sideline coverage in a family medicine residency is feasible. Although there was time required to set it up, it was cost neutral to develop the curriculum. Our curriculum included high fidelity simulators, but the scenarios were developed without these as a requirement to set up and perform. A similar model could be used without a high-fidelity simulator or in non-academic facilities. Significance: A resident-led, simulation and practicum-based sports medicine curriculum is an innovative method to integrate sideline coverage skills into a family medicine residency.

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Columbia Ballroom (CMCC upper level)
 Poster: 123

Evans, Caroline Fitzpatrick, Mary Anne Now is the Time to Listen to Science: Analyzing Sourcing Strategies amongst Newspapers
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This study analyzes coverage of the COVID-19 pandemic from eight major United States-based publications: The Atlanta Journal-Constitution, The Chicago Defender, The Los Angeles Times, The Minneapolis Star-Tribune, The New York Times, The Philadelphia Inquirer, USA Today, and The Washington Post. These publications were chosen because of their impact within the larger media environment and their geographic reach. The study content analyzed the sources quoted in these publications (that is, government officials, politicians, medical and health experts as well as the public). A sourcing analysis of randomly selected front-page articles on an aspect of the COVID-19 pandemic published within specific time periods between February 2020 and December 2021 revealed that journalists used anonymous sources and consulted government officials and politicians in addition to qualified scientists. This approach amplified the politicization of this public health crisis. In addition, the use of anonymous sources undercuts the importance of transparency and source expertise in ethical and effective journalistic communication.

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 2

Warren, Erin Bookstaver, Brandon
Justo, Julie
Kohn, Joseph
Al-Hasan, Majdi
Incidence and clinical predictors of complications in gram-negative bloodstream infections
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Abstract Text

Background/Purpose: Over 500,000 patients develop a bloodstream infection (BSI) in the United States each year. Of these, about 45% are caused by gram-negative isolates. Complications following gram-negative bacteremia are rare, however the precise incidence has not been defined in the literature to date. Furthermore, risk factors for complicated gram-negative bacteremia are unknown, much unlike clinical predictors for complicated Staphylococcus aureus BSI. The purpose of this study is to determine the frequency at which complications of gram-negative bacteremia occur, what those complications are, and clinical criteria that may predict those patients at highest risk for developing complications. Methods: Retrospective chart review will assess how many patients developed complications following BSI due to gram-negative bacilli at two of our regional hospitals from January 2010 to December 2015 using a pre-existing database. Eligible patients are those ≥ 18 year of age with a monomicrobial BSI caused by gram-negative organisms. Recurrent episodes of bacteremia will not be included. Results: In progress Conclusions: In progress

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Columbia Ballroom (CMCC upper level)
 Poster: 95

Javaheri, Armaan Averch, Timothy Refining OR Pick Sheets to Improve Efficiency of Ureteroscopy with Laser Lithotripsy Procedures
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Title: Refining OR Pick Sheets to Improve Efficiency of Ureteroscopy with Laser Lithotripsy Procedures Authors: Armaan Amin-Javaheri, Alec Giakas, Timothy Averch, MD Background: In the operating room, pick sheets are lists of equipment needed for each specific surgery; it is the reference used by surgical staff to gather and organize instruments before a case. Pick sheets should be updated regularly and reviewed prior to the start, otherwise there can be significant delays during the procedure while retrieving needed equipment. These inefficiencies prolong the surgery and put patients at risk, notwithstanding adding to the cost of care, considering the high cost of OR time. Purpose: This quality improvement project aims to improve efficiency in the Prisma Health Baptist hospital operating room for ureteroscopy with laser lithotripsy by ensuring that all required equipment is readily available for each case. Methods: A questionnaire was completed by all urological surgeons at the completion of each ureteroscopy with laser lithotripsy. A Likert scale was used to assess and compare surgeons’ satisfaction both before and after the pick sheets were customized to their preferences. Data was analyzed using student’s t-test, to compare quantitative means, as well as descriptive statistics. Results: Physicians perceived greater efficiency and fewer interruptions to ureteroscopy with lithotripsy procedures after the customization of Pick sheets. Discussion: Updating and customizing pick sheets is a valuable process to help improve efficiency and decrease interruptions in operating rooms. Future improvements will look to implement a system through which physicians and surgical staff communicate regularly to update pick sheets and then restudy the cohort. Developing such as system would help decrease wasted operating room time to focus on improving patient care.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Columbia Ballroom (CMCC upper level)
 Poster: 123

Rice, Garrison Foster, Zoe
Rhodes, Morgan
Chest Pain in a High School Athlete
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History: A 17 yo HS football athlete presented during halftime with acute chest pain and difficulty with inspiration. Patient reported pain on left side of chest. Reported PMH of sickle cell trait and costochondritis (diagnosed in January, flared two weeks earlier, evaluated with a negative CXR and treated with rest + NSAIDs). No reported injury. He described gradual progression of pain with tackling. Pain localized over the left anterior superior chest between the sternum and mid clavicular line of ribs 1-3. Pain worsened with inspiration, back extension, and lifting arm above chest level. Denied SOB, weakness, or dizziness. Physical Exam: GEN: Alert, leaning forward rubbing chest, acyanotic. Chest: No visual deformities or ecchymosis. NT to palpation of sternoclavicular joint, clavicle, and coracoid. Tender to palpation over the sternoclavicular joint L>R. Pain with shoulder adduction and flexion. Left Shoulder: AC joint non-tender. Strength 5/5. ROM wnl. No winging of the scapula. Neurovascularly intact. 2+ radial pulses Special Tests: Hawkins, O’Brien’s, cross body, load and shift, impingement, and apprehension all negative. DDx: 1. Costochondritis 2. Sternoclavicular injury 3. Chest Contusion 4. Rib Fracture 5. Pectoralis Strain Imaging/Results XR Clavicle Left: Left 1st rib fracture with mild displacement CT Chest without Contrast: Oblique subacute fracture of the anterolateral aspect of left first rib with no significant bridging. Final Diagnosis: Left 1st Rib Fracture Discussion: This player likely developed a 1st rib stress fracture, progressing to complete fracture with routine football activities. This fracture is uncommon, usually seen in baseball pitching, basketball, weightlifting, and ballet. Most commonly located in the anterolateral aspect of the first rib. Patients develop pain with coughing, deep inspiration, and overhead activities, similar to costochondritis. Chest XR is negative in 60% of individuals with this fracture. MRI or CT is used when chest XR is negative with continued concern for fracture. Prognosis good and most can return to play with conservative management. Outcome: Athlete treated conservatively, removed from athletic activities for two weeks, and started on Calcium and Vitamin D. Repeat XR two weeks later showed unchanged 1st rib fracture. Patient continued to be symptomatic, undergoing rehab with athletic trainer.

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Columbia Ballroom (CMCC upper level)
 Poster: 124

Powers, Jillian Morris, Caleb The Importance of Implementing a Values-Based Sorority Recruitment
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It is the place where women can chase their passions, nurture their academic endeavors, and foster personal development – and have a sisterhood to support them each step along the way. A shared commitment to be leaders in reinventing what a women’s organization can be and how they can serve the community both within and around them. Joining a Panhellenic sorority gets you to this place; it guides a woman to an organization in which she can develop lifelong friendships, leadership experience, and participate in philanthropic causes. The recruitment process is a values-based journey of self-discovery and reflection. My most impactful contribution to the University and the Greek community was my time serving on Panhellenic’s Recruitment Staff as the Director of Potential New Member Education. I triaged the education, management, and administrative needs to best inform participants on the importance of discovering and maintaining their values as they enter new experiences and arenas. But my most important influence was the emphasis I put on staying true to your personal values and beliefs throughout the process. Joining a sisterhood is choosing to participate in genuine experiences while remaining true to yourself. It is the recruitment process and the journey of self-discovery that is the first step. My presentation will explore the benefits of taking a values-based approach to the sorority recruitment process and how implementing that approach enhances the experience of potential new members throughout the process and the entirity of their membership- as well as activities I facilitated to reinforce that.

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 175

Henry, Shannon Chruszcz, Maksymilian
Hernandez, Ricardo
Study of the Structure and Activity of UDP-glycosyltransferase Originating from Tetranychus urticae
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The Two-Spotted Spider Mite (TSSM) also known as Tetranychus urticae is a classified agricultural pest that can feed on more than 1100 different plant species [1]. What makes the TSSM a danger to agriculturalists is its known ability to rapidly develop adaptive resistance to a variety of pesticides. Studies have shown the TSSM has resistance against even newly synthesized acaricides and has the highest rate of pesticide resistance among any arthropod [2]. To address this problem we aim to characterize uridine diphosphate glycosyltransferases (UGTs) both structurally and biochemically. UGTs are phase II detoxification enzymes that play a major role in processing of toxic compounds. Specifically, UGTs catalyze the covalent addition of sugar moieties to small hydrophobic molecules to increase their solubility and facilitate their excretion [1]. It was previously shown eight UGT genes in the TSSM genome were upregulated upon long-term plant adaptation and acaricide resistance [2]. This study aims to biochemically characterize the enzyme UGT440 and determine its structure using X-ray crystallography. Previously we were able to crystallize the wild-type enzyme, however, the crystals did not diffract well and no structure was determined. Therefore, using the surface entropy reduction (SER) method we determined three residues that likely interfered with the ability of the protein to form crystals [3]. We mutated these residues to those with lower entropy side chains to generate surface patches that can participate in formation of crystal contacts. We also aimed to characterize the enzyme using enzymatic assays and differential scanning fluorimetry (DSF). Our results showed the inserted mutation successfully increased the protein’s ability to crystallize, although the diffraction was not good enough to determine the 3D structure. The enzymatic assays indicate UGT440 is most active at a slightly basic pH and more stable in high salt concentration. With this knowledge we aim to gain more insight about the role UGTs play in detoxification of insecticides with hopes of developing compounds for improved control of the TSSM.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 136

Sans, Isabel Gavin, Michael
Smith, Kaitlyn
To Raise or Raze: Nahuatl Speakers in Mexico
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The status of Nahuatl — Mexico’s most spoken Indigenous language — and its speakers has long fluctuated between privileged, ignored, or scorned. Conflict between the Mexican state and Nahuatl speakers is defined not only by a physical language barrier, but prevailing rhetoric surrounding the role Mexico’s Indigenous populations should play in its social, educational, and cultural spheres. The Nahua are indigenous to central Mexico and their language came to dominate Mesoamerica by 16th century, spoken and spread by the Toltecs and Aztecs. The arrival of Spanish conquistadors destroyed indigenous empires but not their language: Nahuatl became the lingua franca of New Spain, linking diverse communities of Indigenous speakers. This privileged position allowed Nahuatl to develop not only through its encounters with Spanish but also as a literary language. Colonial Nahuatl texts comprise the largest surviving corpus of Indigenous-language literature in the world. Tides shifted in the 18th century, when Spanish was declared the only language of administration. Even after Mexican Independence, Nahuatl made only brief forays into mainstream culture, relegated more and more to rural communities as Indigenous populations were isolated from mainstream Mexican society. Fragmented and isolated from other speakers, regional varieties of Nahuatl developed further until some became mutually unintelligible. A policy of Hispanization throughout the 20th century ensured that when Mexico’s government did consider Nahuatl, it was with a mindset of eventual elimination. Only recently has Mexico truly begun the process of accepting not only its indigenous past, but present and future Indigenous communities. Modern Nahuatl speakers live in a Mexico which enshrines ‘bilingual and bicultural education’ in its constitution and recognizes Indigenous cultures as part of its ‘pluricultural’ makeup. However, Nahuatl speakers still struggle to preserve and raise their language to even a shadow of its former status. They face underfunded bilingual schools, isolated communities, and suffer from negative perceptions of Nahuatl as a language. Speakers must also grapple with a national social and political system that is only beginning to address discrimination against Indigenous citizens.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 11

Ruffin, Jaya Pirich, Laura Confidence is Key to Accessing the Port: Improving Nurse Competency with Port Access in the Pediatric ED
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Background- Pediatric patients with ports often present to the Pediatric ED for fever with central line. Nurses in the Pediatric ED do not access ports as often as nurses on the Hematology/Oncology floor do and often feel uncomfortable accessing ports to draw cultures and labs. Often, the nurses up on the Hematology/Oncology floor are called to come down and assist. Aims- The aim of this quality improvement project was to improve nursing comfort and competency with accessing ports in the Pediatric ED. Furthermore, we also aimed to determine whether a PowerPoint presentation or video presentation for education would be most effective at increasing the number of items on the checklist for accessing ports that nurses completed properly. Methods- A port access simulation was set up in the Peds ED. Nurses were observed accessing a port and were checked off using a step-by-step checklist for proper port access. They were then sent either a PowerPoint or video to watch which demonstrated all the steps for properly accessing a port. They were then checked off again post-intervention and results were compared to their preintervention check off. The percentage of correctly completed steps on the checklist were compared from prior to intervention and post intervention. Results- Our PDSA cycle 1 had 20 participants and a 15.4% relative increase in properly completed items on the checklist from the pre-intervention to post-intervention. Our 2nd PDSA cycle had 16 participants and an 8.34% relative increase in properly completed items on the checklist from the pre-intervention to post-intervention. Nurses who watched the educational PowerPoint for intervention had relative percentage score increase of 10.7% in cycle 1 (n=9) and 17.6% in cycle 2 (n=10). Nurses who watched the educational video for intervention had a relative percentage score increase of 14.4% in cycle 1 (n=11) and 7.87% in cycle 2 (n=6). Conclusions- There was a relative percentage score increase for both PDSA cycles when nurses were in a simulation to access ports. Nurses who watched the PowerPoint presentation. had a greater relative increase in their post-intervention scores that nurses who watched the video in both rounds 1 and 2.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Columbia Ballroom (CMCC upper level)
 Poster: 133

Varanasi, Sreya Schatz, Jeffrey
Bills, Sarah
Medical complications of comorbid α-thalassemia and pediatric sickle cell disease
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Abstract Text

Introduction: Pediatric sickle cell disease (SCD) and α-thalassemia are inherited blood disorders that frequently co-occur and are independently linked to severe physiological complications, including organ damage and shortened life expectancy. However, there is limited and contradictory research exploring the additive effects of these hemoglobinopathies. This study examines the incidence of α-thalassemia within the pediatric SCD population and α-thalassemia as a modifier of morbidity outcomes. We hypothesized that there would be a greater incidence of α-thalassemia in the pediatric SCD population than in the general population. Additionally, we hypothesized that rates of medical complications would vary by α-thalassemia status. Methods: This study evaluated 107 children with SCD (M = 9.4, SD = 1.44, % female = 41.1, % higher-risk genotype= 69.2) as part of a larger psychosocial screening program. Medical chart reviews were conducted to compile data about α-thalassemia co-inheritance, SCD genotype, and history of common medical complications such as acute chest syndrome (ACS), pneumonia, and splenomegaly. Descriptive statistics and chi-square analyses were used to compare the incidence of α-thalassemia within the pediatric SCD population to the base rate in the general population and explore associations between α-thalassemia and medical outcomes. Results: Descriptive analyses indicated that the incidence of α-thalassemia within the pediatric SCD population was 22.4%, which is less than the reported incidence in the general population (31%). Chi square analyses revealed no significant associations between α-thalassemia and history of medical complications within the full sample (n=107). Further analyses within the higher-risk genotype participants (n=74) yielded significant associations between α-thalassemia and ACS, X2(1, N = 74) = 5.369, p=0.020, and pneumonia, X2(1, N = 74) = 4.396, p=0.036, respectively, such that there was lower incidence of ACS and pneumonia in patients with α-thalassemia. Conclusions: The primary hypothesis was not supported; incidence of α-thalassemia within the sample pediatric SCD population was lower than the reported incidence of α-thalassemia in the general population. The secondary hypothesis was partially supported; comorbidity of α-thalassemia and SCD may confer a protective effect against ACS and pneumonia. Further research is needed to clarify the effects of α-thalassemia and SCD co-inheritance.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 53

Dezanet, Laney
Bello, Catelyne
Pazda, Adam An Exploration of Authenticity and Its Effects on The Self and Social Relationships
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Previous research has addressed the relationship between authenticity and psychological well-being. It has been found that satisfaction of all three psychological needs is associated with positive self-esteem (Heppner et al., 2008) and that authenticity is linked to emotional well-being (Brownfield & Brown, 2020; Landa & English, 2021). Additional research found that self-esteem has an impact on our social relationships and overall well-being (Moore et al., 2021; Yan et al., 2019). Previous research by Rasco and Warner (2017) has found that attachment and life satisfaction are mediated by relationship authenticity. The aim of this study is to expand on this previous research to see what factors mediate the relationship between authenticity and several closely related variables. This includes authenticity in relationships, depression, narcissism, psychological needs, attachment styles, life satisfaction, self-esteem, and anxiety. The current study utilized self-report, participants completed a 30-minute questionnaire included the Authenticity in Relationships Scale (AIRS; Lopez & Rice, 2006), Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D; Radloff, 1977), Narcissistic Personality Inventory (Raskin & Hall, 1979), Satisfaction with Life Scale (Diener, Emmons, Larsen, & Griffin, 1985), Basic Psychological Needs Satisfaction Scale (Deci & Ryan, 2000; Gagné, 2003), Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (Rosenberg, 1965), Authenticity Scale (Wood et. Al., 2008), State-Trait Anxiety Inventory for Adults Self Evaluation Questionnaire (Spielberger et. Al., 1983), and Experiences in Close Relationships-Revised (ECR-R) Questionnaire (Fraley et. Al., 2000). Participants were recruited through Amazon Mechanical Turk (MTurk). We are conducting exploratory research to see how these different variables relate to each other. Data has not been analyzed yet, but we expect to find that authenticity would mediate the role between psychological needs and self-esteem. We also hypothesized that authenticity would mediate the role between attachment styles and psychological needs.

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Columbia Ballroom (CMCC upper level)
 Poster: 43

Bohnenkamp, Rachel Stewart, Jill
Lewis, Allison
Effect of social comparative feedback on motor learning differs based on dopaminergic genetics
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Dopamine is an important regulator of physiological processes such as motor function and reward response. Higher levels of neurotransmission of dopamine are associated with better motor learning. Endogenous dopamine levels vary based on genetic variation and may impact how a learner responds to interventions targeted at dopamine pathways. Positive social comparative feedback facilitates motor skill learning by potentially triggering a dopaminergic response. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine the impact of dopamine genotype on learning of a motor sequence task when positive social comparative feedback is provided. Fifty-two adults completed a joystick-based motor task over two consecutive days. Feedback was provided after each block of practice on Day 1. Participants were randomized into one of two feedback groups: response time only (i.e. “You completed the block in 80 seconds”) or positive social comparative feedback (i.e. “You completed the block in 80 seconds. You were faster than others”). Retention, the change in response time from the first block of Day 1 to the first block on Day 2, was used to measure motor learning. Genotypes for dopamine receptors DRD1, DRD2 and DRD3 and COMT were sequenced from saliva samples. Each gene was assigned a score from 0-2 and summed for a polygene score from 0-8 whereby dopamine expression increases with increased score. Participants were grouped into low (1-4) and high (5-8) polygene groups. Feedback groups were not different in sex, age, state or trait anxiety at baseline. A GLM that included a covariate for state anxiety (significantly different between polygene score groups) found a significant interaction (p<0.05) between summary polygene group and feedback group on retention change. The Low dopamine group had greater performance improvements with response time only feedback, while the High dopamine group tended to have greater performance improvements with positive social comparative feedback. The Low dopamine group did not benefit from positive social comparative feedback whereas the High dopamine group did, suggesting that feedback targeting dopaminergic pathways may be more beneficial for individuals with higher endogenous dopamine expression. These findings indicate that dopaminergic genetics impact the efficacy of positive social comparative feedback on motor learning.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 24

Pickens, Andrew Taylor, Jay Hypoxia during the COVID-19 Pandemic – An Old Enemy Returns
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As physicians, the COVID-19 pandemic has changed how we view patients with respiratory symptoms. Patients who present with respiratory failure are presumed to have COVID-19 until proven otherwise. However, numerous other respiratory pathogens may account for the patient's symptoms. Our case examines a 57-year-old male with a history of hypertension presenting with shortness of breath for three months. He was recently discharged from an outside hospital had an extensive workup without a definitive diagnosis. He was subsequently discharged with a referral to a pulmonologist. Upon arrival to our ER, he was hypoxic, requiring a high-flow nasal cannula, and had bilateral ground-glass opacities on computed tomography (CT) scan of the chest. He had tested negative for COVID-19 and was diagnosed with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and pneumocystis pneumonia. This case highlights the numerous clinical and radiographic similarities between COVID-19 and Pneumocystis jirovecii. It also demonstrates the importance of keeping a broad differential diagnosis when evaluating patients presenting with respiratory distress.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Columbia Ballroom (CMCC upper level)
 Poster: 104

Purtell, Jacqueline Karami, Amir Spread of Vaccine Mis(Dis)information on Social Media
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There is a lack of information regarding vaccine misinformation. Misinformation is one of the most pervasive problems in public health as social media and the Internet allow for the rapid exchange of ideas regardless of their factual legitimacy. The definition of the word misinformation has been debated over time, but most agree that health misinformation is a health-related claim that is demonstrably false according to the most recent science. Misinformation, as an umbrella term, is rampant on the Internet in health related fields. Studies have shown that there is a genuine concern across the board, as seen in cases of climate change and viral outbreaks. When misinformation is presented to the public, the effects can be psychological or physical as debates spark opinions that might lead to false treatments or inaction. The opinions formed on facts that are proven false, such as homeopathic treatments for cancer that have been proven ineffective, can lead people to make decisions detrimental to themselves and others. This misinformation can have drastic financial consequences as well. The reaction to the pandemic in society is a global example of the harm of misinformation in health. Many delayed reactions, failures to correct falsehoods, and circulations of misinformation prompted the lack of immediate response and mitigation of the virus. Financially, there have been tremendous consequences. Our research question will be: how vaccine misinformation spread in social media across different times and locations.

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 11

Lynn, Katie Nolan, Melissa Chagas Disease in the United States: Newly Identified Cases of Locally Acquired Infection via Routine Blood Donation
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Background: Chagas disease is a neglected parasitic infection that can cause non-ischemic cardiomyopathy. Early identification of cases is critical to effective parasite clearance via treatment intervention; however, many individuals do not present with symptoms until past the point of treatment efficacy. Though no national surveillance exists for Chagas Disease, routine blood donation has become an unintentional form of surveillance and source of infection identification in the United States. Study Design and Methods: Blood donors first identified through screening at California and Arizona blood-banks completed risk factor questionnaires and donated a small blood sample for confirmatory testing. Samples underwent testing by four distinct assays at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the University of South Carolina. This study was approved by the University of South Carolina Institutional Review Board and collaborating blood banks’ respective human subjects research committees. Results: We identified three confirmed and one probable locally acquired Chagas disease cases to add to the existing body of literature surrounding autochthonous Chagas disease in the United States. Discussion: Locally acquired Chagas disease cases are at particular risk of remaining undetected due to lack of symptomology and absence of traditionally considered risk factors for this neglected tropical disease. Transmission dynamics should be clarified to increase physician awareness of these rare infections that do occur in the United States.

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Columbia Ballroom (CMCC upper level)
 Poster: 47

Packer, Margaret Lewis, Timothy Personalizing Globalization
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From January 2021 through August 2021, I lived, studied, and worked in Vienna, Austria. Having known for years my top professional and personal goals were to achieve fluency in German, and work in a German-speaking country, studying abroad was a natural step towards achieving those goals. Through the International Business major, I studied at Wirtschaftsuniversität Wien from March until the end of May, taking courses with an international perspective on management and business. Although originally scheduled to return stateside in late May for a summer internship in Georgia, by April I recognized the true long-term value of this international experience in how it was ultimately contributing to my life goals. After roughly two months of researching, applying, and interviewing for dozens of positions, I accepted an internship with the United Nations Commission on International Trade Law. Remaining in Vienna through the summer, experiencing the life of a working professional and not simply an international student, was the perfect way to conclude my time abroad. Originally only planning to be in Vienna for the four-to-five months of the semester, completing courses required for my major and hopefully improving my language skills before coming home for an internship, the extended time in Vienna provided a far more enriching experience. From joining the commuters crowd on the early morning U-Bahn, to finally experiencing the famous café culture of Vienna as pandemic restrictions loosened, I felt like more of a local and less of a visiting international student during those summer months. Finally achieving my longtime dream of living and working in a foreign country, it was the realization that this was the beginning of more to come that made me certain of my future goals. Although those seven months were just the beginning of my life and career in Europe, the key insights I took away from that time is imperative to my future-to-come on the other side of the Atlantic.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 156

Turner, Lauren Nolan, Melissa
Braumuller, Kyndall
Evaluating the Emergence of the Gulf Coast Tick and Rickettsia parkeri Pathogen in South Carolina
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The Amblyomma maculatum tick, also known as the Gulf Coast tick, has increased in prevalence in states neighboring South Carolina and is thought to have increased in South Carolina as well. This is of public health importance because it has been documented that the Gulf Coast tick is the primary vector of the pathogen Rickettsia parkeri. This pathogen causes rickettsiosis, a disease similar to Rocky Mountain spotted fever. This disease causes flu like symptoms, which results in low diagnosis and misdiagnosis. South Carolina is predicted to be a high-risk area for this disease because of our favorable climate for the Gulf Coast tick and our high tick abundance. Although Rickettsia parkeri does not have as high of a case fatality rate as Rocky Mountain spotted fever, it is still a concern because of the significant morbidity this disease causes. The Gulf Coast tick has been found in multiple mid-Atlantic states, having high R. parkeri infection rates. When speciating ticks from a South Carolina state-wide tick surveillance project, it became clear that there are hundreds, if not thousands, of Amblyomma maculatum ticks in our state. Using the ticks that have been collected from this project, we will conduct DNA extraction followed by PCR amplification to identify rickettsial pathogens, including Rickettsia parkeri, in Gulf Coast ticks. If this study proves the R. parkeri pathogen is present in the state of South Carolina, physicians can become more aware of the disease this pathogen causes, ultimately leading to a more accurate diagnoses of Rickettsioses.

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 56

Anil Peethambar, Gowri Venkatesh, Y. Swamy Existing controversies in the management of cavernous sinus thrombophlebitis
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Abstract: Background: Septic cavernous sinus thrombophlebitis is a rare but deadly disease requiring prompt rapid evaluation with appropriate imaging and early initiation of treatment. Case Report: We describe a HIV positive female with Stage IV DLBCL with sinus involvement who presented with new onset left Abducens nerve palsy secondary to septic cavernous sinus thrombophlebitis. Our patient was treated with both broad-spectrum antibiotics and anticoagulants. She simultaneously underwent chemotherapy for DLBCL. Patient’s nerve function improved gradually with time. Conclusion: Septic cavernous sinus thrombophlebitis is an infrequent diagnosis requiring complete awareness among Neurologists. Timely diagnosis and accurate treatment is critical. Controversies regarding use of anticoagulation, optimal timing, and length of treatment are discussed.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Columbia Ballroom (CMCC upper level)
 Poster: 105

Williams, Desiree Shorter, Kimberly Does miR-718 affect PLC-B2 expression and CREB phosphorylation?
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Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) manifestations in behavior include aggressive tendencies, issues with social communication and other challenging behaviors. The number of diagnoses has increased over the past decade. There are also some dysregulated cellular mechanisms, seen in patients with ASD that effect brain morphology. For example, cell cleaning, or autophagy, has been shown to be decreased in ASD brains, and autophagy dysregulation can result in increased dendritic spines in the brain. Further, Calcium signaling and neurotransmission are lost to some degree in ASD patients. MicroRNAs are small RNAs, roughly 22 nucleotides long, that can bind to and degrade many different messenger RNAs, and they can exert their effects on many different pathways. Previously in our lab, miR-718 was shown to have effects on autophagy through targeting PTEN. MiR-718 is also suspected to target PLC-B2, which is an enzyme that cleaves phosphatidylinositol molecules in the cell membrane and form two second messengers: IP3 and DAG. IP3 binds the smooth ER membrane to allow for Calcium release, which affects transcription factor CREB’s phosphorylation and subsequently gene expression. Here, we present data for our investigation of whether miR-718 targets PLC-B2 and whether this subsequently affects downstream CREB phosphorylation.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 101

Cortinas, Alexis Grewe, Maureen Oh, yes I Madrid
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Through the university, I was offered the experience to attend the University of Carlos III of Madrid (Universidad de Carlos III de Madrid) during the fall semester of my freshman year. Upon graduation, I plan on traveling throughout Europe for the summer before returning to California and pursuing a career with JP Morgan Chase as a commercial banker. Currently, at my university I am a part of several on campus organizations including the Women in Business Council and also serve as the head of the Diversity and Inclusion Committee for my sorority, Phi Mu. These experiences have helped me gain confidence in myself and in leading others. This eportfolio was created based on my study abroad experience in Madrid for my Graduation with Leadership Distinction in Global Learning. Although this opportunity only lasted a few short months, it has forever impacted my life, my outlook on the world, and most of the way I view myself. I am now able to approach professional and personal situations with an expanded mindset that I would not have developed had I not studied abroad in a different country. Many people may ask, “How does living in a different country help influence someone’s finance or marketing major?” Well, through taking several marketing courses and learning about the various financial systems and institutions throughout the world, I now have a better understanding on how the world is similar, and differs. Hopefully while reading about my three insights: How food is a window to culture, The different places you’ll go, and discovering yourself, I can give a slight glimpse into sharing that this opportunity offered a comprehensive experience for not only my academic improvement but also my individual improvement as well.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 229

Dea, Alana Bradshaw, Jessica
Federico, Alexis
Bimanual Object Manipulation and Motor Skills in Infants at Elevated Likelihood for Autism Spectrum Disorder
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Current autism spectrum disorder (ASD) research focuses on identifying early indicators of the disorder, such as motor skills, to help promote early intervention and the success that results from such interventions. Manual manipulation of objects is a specific motor skill often studied in infancy due to its relevance to more general exploration and interaction skills (Vollmer & Forssberg, 2009). A preliminary review of the literature suggests that infants who are at an elevated likelihood (EL; indicated by an older fully biological sibling diagnosed with ASD) for ASD score low on motor skill tests, specifically on fine motor skills, in early infancy. The same research also suggests that motor scores can predict severity of ASD symptoms as age progresses (Iverson et al, 2019). The purpose of this study is to assess the relationship between the use of bimanual manipulation at 6 months of age and the maturity of gross and fine motor skills at 12 months of age. This study will also examine both low likelihood (LL) and EL groups for ASD to assess the relationship between bimanual manipulation at 6-months of age and likelihood status for ASD. Infants enrolled in a longitudinal study of infant development completed a one-minute interaction with an age-appropriate toy at 6 months of age to assess manipulation. The Mullen Scales of Early Learning assessment was administered at 12 months of age to assess motor skills, and the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule (ADOS) assessment was administered at 24 months of age to determine ASD status. Results of this study will reveal associations between object manipulation and motor skills that may influence future screening and intervention efforts.

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 79

Gual Gonzalez, Lídia Nolan, Melissa State-Wide Cross-Sectional Evaluation of Knowledge and Level of Concern of Rabies Among South Carolina Residents
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Abstract Text

Animal rabies cases have increased steadily in South Carolina over the past decade. Since the last human rabies case in 2011, the state population’s awareness about rabies has not been evaluated, potentially underestimating the rabies transmission risk to humans. An understanding of community disease perceptions is needed to tailor public health interventions. Using a marketing list-serv of South Carolina residents’ email addresses, we recruited anonymous respondents to answer a Knowledge, Attitudes and Practices 31-question electronic survey. A total of 516 South Carolina residents completed the electronic survey. The survey evaluated knowledge on topics of rabies biology, state prevalence, and rabies pet-related laws; concern was evaluated at the community and personal level; and finally, there was an assessment on rabies-related practices for pet owners. Quantile regression and Pearson’s correlation evaluated the potential associations between respondent’s rabies knowledge and their attitudes and practices. Level of concern and level of knowledge showed to be positively correlated. Geographical Information Systems (GIS) approaches were used to perform state-wide hotspot analysis and a bivariate representation of rabies cases in animals, revealing areas warranting targeted public health interventions in the upstate region; counties with low public concern were juxtapositioned with areas of higher animal rabies prevalence. Rabies remains a potential risk for certain areas upstate such as Greenville and Spartanburg counties and should not be neglected in the minds of health professionals and public health leaders. The results of this study demonstrate the utility of state-wide KAPs to gauge population’s rabies perception and related preventive actions to tailor appropriate educational programs to limit human-animal rabies exposures.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Columbia Ballroom (CMCC upper level)
 Poster: 39

Ladouceur, Madeline Edwards, Janice Describing the Experiences of Canadian Genetic Counseling Students Studying in the United States
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Abstract Text

There are fewer and smaller genetic counseling master’s programs in Canada compared to the United States, which makes it challenging for prospective Canadian students to train in their home country. We investigated which factors influenced Canadian students to apply or not to apply to American genetic counseling training programs, as well as the experiences of those Canadians who attended a program in the United States. We predicted that Canadian students applied to American genetic counseling training programs primarily because of limited training opportunities in Canada and a competitive application process across North America. We used a mixed method, online survey to study Canadian genetic counseling students who matched with a training program during the 2018-2021 application cycles. Descriptive statistics and thematic analysis were used to analyze the collected data. We had a total of 72 respondents, most of whom identified as female, white, and not Hispanic or Latino, and a response rate of 48.6%. Limited training opportunities in Canada and a competitive application process were the most common factors that influenced Canadian students to apply to American programs. Cost of education in the United States and cost and logistics of the GRE requirement for American programs were the most common factors that influenced Canadians not to apply to an American program. Canadian genetic counseling students who studied in the United States faced challenges related to being an international student and stated that more information, contact with other Canadians, and personal support from the program and/or institution would have improved their experience. We propose the development of informational materials and a support network of Canadian genetic counseling students that can be advertised in a joint effort by NSGC and AGCPD. To our knowledge, this is the first study to investigate the experiences of Canadian genetic counseling students and our findings highlight the unique challenges faced by this group.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Columbia Ballroom (CMCC upper level)
 Poster: 69

Roland, Mary Kubinak, Jason B-cell-intrinsic MHCII signaling limits bacteremia and systemic invasion by Citrobacter rodentium
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B-cell-intrinsic major histocompatibility complex class II (MHCII) antigen presentation is central to the development of T-cell-dependent antibody responses. However, the physiological significance of B-cell-intrinsic MHCII signaling during homeostatic conditions and infection are unknown. Here, using a B-cell-intrinsic MHCII knockout mouse model, we demonstrate that B-cell-intrinsic MHCII signaling is important for the development of systemic IgG1 and mucosal high-affinity IgA responses. We also show that the conditional ablation of MHCII signaling on B cells results in a change in the microbiota composition, exhibiting a significant increase in the mucin-degrading bacteria Akkermansia muciniphila. This change in the microbiome is also associated with elevated bacterial dissemination from the gut into the systemic compartment under homeostatic conditions. Additionally, using a Citrobacter rodentium model of acute gastrointestinal infection, we also demonstrate the relevance of B-cell-intrinsic MHCII signaling in limiting invasion of the systemic compartment by an opportunistic enteric pathogen. Results from these experiments demonstrate that B-cell-intrinsic MHCII signaling is an important factor minimizing the physiological cost of microbial colonization of the gut.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Columbia Ballroom (CMCC upper level)
 Poster: 55

Gange, Gayathri B. Peryshkov, Dmitry V. Metal-free Bond Activation by Carboranyl Phosphines
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Abstract Text

Among the main group-based catalysts, Phosphine based compounds have shown a variety of bond activations due to the strong nucleophilicity from their congener species. To the contrary, unique electron deficient boron-based clusters have the tendency to accept two electrons reversibly due to their electron deficiency. In this study, we have synchronized the electron donor ability of the phosphine with the electron acceptor ability of the ortho-carborane to construct a new carboranyl phosphine cluster. The unusual steric and electronic properties of this cluster have demonstrated strong bond activation analogous to transition metal-based bond activation such as oxidative addition and reductive elimination. Herein, metal free activation of small molecules by the carboranyl phosphine ligand and its applications will be introduced.

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Columbia Ballroom (CMCC upper level)
 Poster: 73

Jayaweera, Hindurangalage Don Asela Chathumal Peryshkov, Dmitry V. Synthesis, Isolation and Characterization of “Naked” Three-Dimensional Carbanions
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Carbanions are important highly-reactive intermediates in organic synthesis. Their reactivity relies on extreme nucleophilicity of a carbon atom bearing partial negative charge. The majority of carbanions exists as ion pairs that have significant covalent bonding interactions between carbanion and the corresponding cation. In this work, we utilized carboranes, icosahedral boron-carbon molecular clusters, as a platform to explore feasibility of formation and isolation of completely separated ion pairs that have carbanionic centers that are not bond to any charge-compensating cations. The acidic C-H group in the carborane cage is metalated by a strong base in these functionalization reactions to generate the reactive carbanion. The pathway of this metalation reaction was studied by isolating the intermediates. Herein, by the use of metal chelating ligands the metal cation is separated from the carborane cage without charge compensation for the first time to isolate the highly nucleophilic “naked” 3D carborane carbanion and the metal cation. Importantly, these findings shed light on functionalization of the carbon atoms of the carborane cage that is carried out via formation of transient carbanions

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Columbia Ballroom (CMCC upper level)
 Poster: 74

Hathaway, Holland Goldberg, Kelly Observations on the Keys to Student Success within Early Childhood Classrooms
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There has been substantial and on-going discussion in academia regarding how educators in Early Childhood classrooms can increase student engagement, growth, and success. Through my professional and civic engagements at the University of South Carolina, as well as my Internship experiences in 4K and 1st grade at Oak Pointe Elementary School, I have identified these three key-insights that reflect my teaching philosophy as an Early Childhood Educator. My insights include observations on the ways positive engagements generating student success, how engaging culturally relevant practices impacts students, and that employing differentiated instruction can lead to success for all learners. By building positive relationships with their students, teachers can understand student’s interests and developmental levels and then implement this information when generating lesson plans and activities. By practicing Culturally Relevant Pedagogy, students will know they are in a supportive environment where their different identities will be acknowledged and celebrated. Lastly, by utilizing differentiated instruction, students’ individual learning needs will be met, while helping all students remain engaged and experience success within a lesson or unit. By implementing these insights into one’s classroom, all students should be able to experience success and grow within their learning experiences.

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 192

Clarkson, Wright Rainwater, Brittany An Analysis of Missed Appointments
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Missed appointments, more commonly known as "no-shows", account for the loss of time, money, and patient well-being. A behavioral health practice based in McLeod Health underwent data-analysis to identify potential factors that may be influencing an increased "no-show" rate, and the results bring to light interesting conclusions.

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Columbia Ballroom (CMCC upper level)
 Poster: 159

Bloomquist, Ryan Bloomquist, Ryan Reduction of Sars-CoV-2 Oral Viral Load with Prophylactic Mouth Rinse
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Background Since the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, preventative pre-procedural oral rinses have been widely used to reduce the spread of SARS-CoV-2 in dental settings, hoping that these rinses can reduce disease transmission by lowering the amount of virus in a potentially infected patients mouth. However, little direct clinical empirical evidence exists that establishes their efficacy in reducing the oral viral load of SARS-CoV-2. The purpose of this study was to test the short-term efficacy of four commercial mouth rinses compared to water, in reducing SARS-CoV-2 viral load in the oral cavity over clinically relevant time points, thus helping to prevent the spread of COVID-19 in healthcare practices. Methods 32 subjects positive for SARS-CoV-2 virus in a PCR-based diagnostic test at the local hospital were recruited and randomized into 5 parallel arms. Cycle threshold (Ct) values were compared in saliva samples between the groups and within the groups at baseline (pre-rinse) and at 0 hours, 1 hour, and 2 hours post-rinse, using SARS-CoV-2 RT-PCR Analysis. Results Using a two-way, repeated-measure analysis of variance, we observed a significant increase in Ct values in saliva samples collected immediately after rinsing with all the four mouthwashes-0.12% Chlorhexidine gluconate (n=3), 1.5% Hydrogen peroxide (n=4), 1% Betadine (n=3), Listerine (n=3) compared to water (n =3) (p

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Columbia Ballroom (CMCC upper level)
 Poster: 87

Wedge, Taylor Morris, Caleb Respecting the Dignity of All Persons: Education Through Student Conduct
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The Carolina Judicial Council is an honors organization at the University of South Carolina that exists to promote the Carolinian Creed and allow students to serve on hearings for individual instances of student conduct or academic integrity appeals. In my time in CJC, I have served on and chaired multiple hearings in which a charged student has disagreed with the outcome of their OSCAI meeting and decided to allow a panel of their peers to decide responsibility for the violation, as well as what their sanctioning should be given that they are found responsible. I decided to join CJC because I am passionate about making UofSC a better place and ensuring that the rights and privileges of all students and faculty are upheld. From this experience, I have learned the importance of respecting the dignity of all persons and I have gained the ability to look at situations from an unbiased view. When taking on a CJC hearing, it is vitally important to study all parts of the situation at hand, whether this is a first-time violation or grounds for possible suspension. I would like others to know that I am able to communicate effectively, work in a team, and analyze the whole of a situation better than I was able to before joining CJC. As far as my future plans for CJC, I plan to finish out my time in college serving on as many hearings as possible, as well as helping the Creed Programming Committee with promoting and educating students on the importance of the tenants of the Carolinian Creed.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 181

Bloomquist, Ryan Bloomquist, Ryan De-Novo Innervation of a Transplant Organ
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Abstract Text

At present, damage to nervous tissue is difficult to treat, often irreversible, and furthermore nerve growth to new sites is very limited. I hypothesized that teeth have a special capability to induce nerves and that we can isolate tissues and factors that could be used in a clinical setting to completely regenerate nerves. In human clinical studies, developing third molar teeth have been autologously transplanted to 1st molar defect sites, and have continued to grow and more astoundingly have gained the ability for thermal-regulated nociception. This finding implies that developing teeth transplanted to a bony defect induce de-novo nerve growth at the recipient site. In this working study I utilize the rat model to demonstrate de-novo nerve growth by transplanting whole teeth to iatrogenic bony-defects and performing histological and biochemical analysis. Demonstrating innervation in transplanted teeth of post-natal rats would indicate that dental tissues are indeed capable of promoting nerve growth in a transplanted organ. I created a novel system wherein I transplanted growing third molars autologously to rat tibias. Wounds were closed and the animal recovered for later analysis of tooth integration into tibia. Transplants were analyzed using micro-CT, hematoxylin and eosin stain, and immunofluorescence with a nerve marker, Anti-Acetylated Tubulin antibody. At 7 weeks post-surgery inflammation and bone remodeling was dominant, but by week 14 post surgery teeth were well integrated into bone and vitalized with both vascularization and innervation. These results demonstrate that teeth transplanted autologously to tibia can integrate into the leg, survive as independent organs with their own blood supply, and early evidence indicates innervation of the transplanted tooth. These results will be supported with a genetic transcriptome analysis, and the combined results of these studies will be the establishment of a nerve growth model with identification of dental tissue layers and specific molecular candidates that can eventually be used in regenerative medicine. These data are applicable to patients’ needing re-innervation of eye, spine, extremity, teeth and many other organs. The implications are far-reaching and may lead to novel nerve regeneration therapeutics.

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Columbia Ballroom (CMCC upper level)
 Poster: 88

Gallello, Vittoria Morris, Caleb Going Abroad During a Pandemic
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Coming from an Italian family, I was always interested in gaining a greater appreciation for my family and where they come from. I decided to spend a semester in Florence during Spring 2021. This gave me the opportunity to fully immerse myself and get to relate to my family on another level. My experience was far from the traditional abroad. Living in Italy during a Pandemic, I was one of the few Americans in Florence. Although this prevented me from traveling, I was able to explore the city to its full potential, developing relationships with locals, and other international students. I formed unbreakable bonds and became a local at some of my favorite Florentine spots. My abroad experience offered me more than I could ever imagine. Through my studies, I also truly understood the impact of global marketing and how brands adapt messaging to different cultures. I got a glimpse of the global marketing space and understand my passion for the field. I am so grateful for UofSC for giving me the opportunity to study abroad especially in such a time of uncertainty. I will truly never forget this experience. I’ve learned so much about myself and what I want within a future career. The world is so big, and it truly is so beautiful to learn and experience other cultures and ways of life.

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 221

Willard, Madie Carrico, Alex Music Field Day
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Abstract Text

Music is said to be the universal language. However, the reality is that our understanding of music often privileges a hearing-centric experience of music, which excludes the Deaf and hard of hearing community. In order for music to be universal, we must expand our definitions to include the way music is enjoyed by the Deaf community (Schraer-Joiner, Lyn, and Manuela Prause-Weber). Narrowly defining music as sound interpreted by the ear assumes that the audience can hear and solely processes and understands sound through the ear (Loeffler, 2014). It is often assumed for a non-hearing or hard of hearing person that silence can mean absence (Schraer-Joiner, Lyn, and Manuela Prause-Weber). However, beyond sound audiation, Deaf people experience music through poetry, visual stimulation, and body by vibration via the beat. This necessitates the creation of an event where these students are allowed to do just that. This project will allow the Deaf community to come together and experience music in an accessible way. Furthermore, this event will allow members of the hearing community to expand their understanding of music by experiencing sound from a Deaf perspective and engaging with people from the Deaf community. The goal is for the children to experience music tailored to them and to create a sense of community from this shared experience. In addition to creating an event that serves the unmet needs of this community, as a music major with a concentration in entrepreneurship, planning for this event has allowed me to build essential skills, such as engaging in community outreach, collaborating with community partners, and securing material and financial buy-in from organizations in the public and private sector.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 164

Kemp, Cassidy Blandy, Sarah
Dubruille, Gabrielle
Efficacy of oral and intravenous magnesium replacement in hospitalized heart failure patients undergoing intravenous diuresis with loop diuretics
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Abstract Text

Hospitalized heart failure (HF) patients are at an increased risk for hypomagnesemia, leading to worsening comorbidities and adverse events. There is limited literature that has assessed the optimal route and dose for magnesium replacement, as well as contributing factors influencing replacement in the HF population. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of differing magnesium replacement regimens based on institutional protocols. This was a single-centered, retrospective, cohort study of an inpatient adult population with HF treated between 5/1/2021 and 9/1/2021. The primary outcome was to evaluate the efficacy of oral and intravenous (IV) magnesium replacement in patients with HF undergoing diuresis with IV loop diuretics by reviewing the mean increase (mg/dL) in serum Mg level from baseline. Secondary outcomes include evaluation of influencing patient-specific factors, normalization of Mg levels, and timing of replacement. Statistical methods for this study included Chi-square test, T-test, and linear regression. The results and conclusions are in progress to be presented with final poster.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Columbia Ballroom (CMCC upper level)
 Poster: 147

Nye, Eric Epps, Lauren Internship Experience with Live Oak Consultants
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Abstract Text

While working at Live Oak Consultants (LOC), I designed and analyzed many electrical systems in industrial and commercial settings. One of the main assessments of electrical systems I performed at LOC was called Arc Flash Hazard Analysis (AFHA). The purpose of the Arc Flash studies is to ensure that electrical systems are safe and up to date. The first thing I’d do once the job has started is to go out to the site and record data. Using pictures and notes, I would record the location of all major electrical equipment, the wire sizes and lengths, and the breaker models and settings for the entire plant. Then, I would develop a schematic in a specialized program to model the plant. Once this has been created, I could run tests and calculate the incident energy all around the plant for the worst-case scenarios. This gives us a sort of “danger rating” for all the large electrical equipment around the plant. Once I have completed this process, labels are printed and posted on the electrical equipment, so electricians along with anyone reading the label will know how large a possible arc flash could be at that location. Through this process, I have learned quite a lot about how electrical systems are designed, maintained, and much more. These studies are very important in ensuring the safety and wellbeing of electricians and the general public in and around these plants. I have thoroughly enjoyed this process and will be starting my career at LOC in May upon my graduation from University of South Carolina.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 210

Brown, Jacob Lu, Kevin Assessing the Risk of Dementia among Older Adults with Hypertension in the U.S.
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Abstract Text

Jacob Brown1, Xiaomo Xiong1, Jun Wu2, Minghui “Sam” Li3, Z. Kevin Lu1 Background Hypertension is one of the components of MetS and has a high prevalence among the elderly, especially among individuals with dementia. Objective To assess the association between hypertension, one of the components of MetS, and dementia, and to determine if there are racial/ethnic disparities that increase the association further. Methods A cross-sectional study design based on the Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey (MCBS) 2017 was conducted. The study population of this study included Medicare beneficiaries aged 65 years or older. Participants were excluded if they were eligible for the Medicare program due to end-stage renal disease (ESRD), disabled, or joined the Health Maintenance Organization (HMO). Multivariable logistic regression models were used to estimate the association between hypertension and ADRD. Subgroup analyses were conducted to assess if there were racial/ethnic disparities. Results Among 15,207 Medicare beneficiaries, a total of 7,049 (46.4%) and 1,335 (8.8%) individuals were identified with hypertension and dementia, respectively. The prevalence of dementia was more than 5 times higher among patients with hypertension (17.9%) compared to those without (2.7%, P<.001). After controlling for covariates, compared to beneficiaries without hypertension, those who had hypertension were significantly more likely to have dementia [Odds ratio (OR) = 3.49; 95 % confidence interval (CI): 2.73–4.46]. The association between hypertension and dementia was strongest among Hispanic beneficiaries (OR = 5.90; 95% CI: 1.64–21.02), followed by among non-Hispanic Caucasian beneficiaries (OR = 3.36; 95% CI: 2.58–4.36). Conclusion Hypertension appears to be associated with a higher risk of dementia in the older adults. Clinically, health care providers may need to be paid more attention to their conscious health. In addition, there may be racial differences in the association between hypertension and dementia, and the difference should be noted for diagnosis and/or management of the chronic conditions for older adults.

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Columbia Ballroom (CMCC upper level)
 Poster: 89

O'Keeffe, Emma Gavin, Michael
Dubinsky, Stanley
Language Rights for Berber Speakers in France
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Abstract Text

This presentation examines the relationship between French speakers and Berber speakers in France and examines how Berber speakers are marginalized in a Francophone nation. The Berbers, or Amazigh, are an ethnolinguistic group indigenous to North Africa, specifically Algeria, Morocco, and Tunisia. The Berber language is a branch of the Afro-Asiatic language family with four major varieties spoken in Northern Africa. Berber speakers have historically lacked recognition in representation even in their native countries. Only recently have Berber speakers in Morocco and Algeria received official recognition in any capacity, despite being indigenous to the area. The 1930’s to 1960’s brought about a Berber diaspora to Europe, mainly from the Kabylie region of Algeria. Berber speakers arrived in Europe as ‘guest’ workers and quickly established a community in several European countries. This diaspora led to a significant Berber population in France, particularly in more urban areas such as Paris. Berber speakers lack recognition in France and are grouped in with the ‘Arab’ or Maghribi population despite the fact that the two groups are entirely different. Hence, one can only estimate the actual number of Berber speakers in France. As a Francophone nation, France is largely intolerant of linguistic minorities legally, sociopolitically, and educationally. Berber, specifically the Kabyle variety, speakers in France have fought for their language rights through organizations such as L'Académie Berbère and through demonstrations such as the Beurs' March. Still, Berber speakers experience low levels of linguistic freedom in France. The research in this presentation was conducted to draft an encyclopedia entry for the Language Conflict Project, a database detailing language conflict across the world. The presentation has five sections, including the synopsis, historical background, linguistic background, timeline, and stories. My findings will aid in not only highlighting the historic plight of Berber speakers but also understanding the severity and importance of ethnolinguistic conflict worldwide.

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 21

Alkhatib, Bailey
Barfield, Matthew
Karavites, Lindsey Evaluating Geriatric Trauma Patient Triage at a Level I Trauma Center
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Abstract Text

Background: Geriatric trauma patients are at higher risk of mortality and morbidity due to decreased physiologic reserve and underlying diseases, and often fail to exhibit the standard derangements that trigger trauma team activation (TTA). This puts elderly patients at a higher risk for undertriage. Some trauma centers have age-based TTA criteria and admit all geriatric trauma patients to the trauma unit. Despite improved patient outcomes, there are concerns that overtriage in this population might overwhelm system resources. Currently, Prisma Richland's TTA criteria for geriatric trauma patients is not a solely age-based metric but is a modification from standard TTA criteria. However, it may be insufficient to avoid detrimental undertriage of this patient population. We hypothesize that the current geriatric TTA criteria at Prisma Richland are leading to undertriage (>5%) of patients age > 65, while overtriage of patients is below the accepted rate of 50%. Methods: Patients age > 65, seen at Prisma Richland for a trauma-related injury between 3/1/2021 and 2/2/2022 were included in the study. No exclusion criteria were used. MRNs of patients who met the inclusion criteria were pulled from the Prisma Richland Trauma Registry, which included demographics, mechanism of injury, vital signs at the scene and on admission, ISS, interventions and operations performed, time of procedures and operations, mortality, disposition after leaving the ED, and discharge disposition. Patient EMR was also accessed to examine patient outcomes in greater detail. Overtriage and undertriage rates were calculated utilizing the Cribari method. Patients were stratified by age and ISS. Statistical analyses were performed in SAS. Results: Data analysis is ongoing. Results will be disseminated in the poster presentation. Conclusions: The geriatric population is at increased risk of undertriage and ultimately morbidity and mortality in the setting of trauma. Multiple studies have found that these risks in geriatric trauma patients can be reduced by early involvement of the trauma team. Upon conclusion of data analysis we aim to assess the efficacy of the TTA protocol at Prisma Health Richland by analyzing rates of undertriage and overtriage in the geriatric population.

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Columbia Ballroom (CMCC upper level)
 Poster: 144

Awe, Moji
Beecroft, Jennifer
Felder, Tisha Assessing adjuvant hormonal therapy patient education materials for health literacy-related factors
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Abstract Text

Background: Less than half of hormone-receptor positive (HR+) breast cancer survivors take adjuvant hormonal therapy (AHT) as recommended, and rates are lower among those from socioeconomically disadvantaged backgrounds. Consequences of poor AHT adherence are significantly associated with disease progression and increased mortality. Preliminary findings from interviews conducted in South Carolina with 25 Medicaid-insured, breast cancer survivors and 19 health care providers suggest that patient education about AHT is an important modifiable factor that can influence AHT adherence. Patient education materials must be understandable and actionable to improve AHT adherence. Purpose: This study will assess existing AHT patient education materials for factors related to health literacy. Methods: Existing AHT patient education materials were identified from the American College of Surgeons’ National Accreditation Program for Breast Centers (NAPBC) list of 34 breast cancer patient and advocacy organizations. The websites of each organization were searched for any materials related to AHT: tamoxifen, anastrozole, letrozole, and exemestane. Preliminary Results: AHT patient education materials were identified from 23 of the 34 NAPBC listed organizations. 18 of the materials focused on AHT overall, and others focused specifically on anastrozole (n=5), letrozole (n=5), exemestane (n=5) or tamoxifen (n=12). Next Steps & Potential Implications: The relevant patient education materials will be assessed using the Patient Education Materials Assessment Tool (PEMAT) (AHRQ, 2014) and Suitability Assessment of Materials (SAM) (Doak & Doak, 1996). The analysis of these materials will determine whether existing patient education materials are health literacy appropriate, or if it would be beneficial for new materials to be developed. This knowledge can then be utilized to develop and implement interventions to improve breast cancer survivor adherence to AHT, especially within socioeconomically disadvantaged communities.

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Columbia Ballroom (CMCC upper level)
 Poster: 117

Pilcher, Sarah DeWeil, David Connection and Kindness in Leadership
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Abstract Text

Over the summer of 2021, I worked as a program specialist for the Carolina Master Scholars program hosted by the UofSC Pre-Education Office. While I was working, I had to lead a broad range of students from ages 9 to 17, all with their own personalities and experiences, and my initial strategy was to treat the position like a job. I didn’t want to get too connected to students in a way that would make it harder to do my job and be seen as a leader. Fortunately, I failed spectacularly at this goal. I realized while working that students tend to connect and listen to a leader that takes the time to get to know and connect with them. I have always wanted to be a professor when I grow up, whether it be for law classes or for undergraduate classes, and this experience taught me a lot about what it means to be a teacher and a leader. Initially, I believed that if I showed empathy or kindness, my campers would walk all over me and not see me as a strong figure. I made the mistake of assuming that people mistake empathy and kindness for weakness and quickly learned that that was not the case. The more I connected with my students, the more they heeded what I said or followed instructions. Using this experience going forward as both a practicing lawyer and hopefully a professor eventually, I will no longer try to minimize my nurturing personality but instead use it to prove that empathy and kindness have a strong hang in both leadership and strength.

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 193

Blackmon, Sarah Nolan, Melissa ALL-IN SC: Preliminary findings of COVID-19 Pandemic Impacts on Mental Health in South Carolina
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Abstract Text

Introduction: The uncertainty surrounding COVID-19 as well as insecurities due to conflicting information about transmission, control measures, and economic loss resulting in unemployment instilled a level of fear among people contributing to an increase in mental health illnesses. Individuals with lower income as well as minority groups face greater risks for COVID-19 complications and mortality and are at higher risk of mental health illnesses. ALL-IN SC, a statewide initiative in collaboration with UofSC’s Laboratory of Vector-borne and Zoonotic Diseases and SC DHEC, seeks to improve pandemic and future outbreak response by collecting the experiences and opinions of at-risk community voices through qualitative focus groups. Although ALL-IN SC primarily focuses on assessing the future utility and acceptability of at-home testing, participants were also asked to reflect on their pandemic experience and how it affected their mental health. Therefore, this study seeks to highlight COVID-19 and its effects on the mental health of underserved and underrepresented populations in South Carolina. Methods: Participants were asked about their beliefs regarding SARS-CoV-2 susceptibility, as well as barriers of at-home testing and effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on themselves and their community. The focus groups were purposely sampled to assure a diverse, representative sample related to location, race/ethnicity, political affiliation, religious affiliation, education level, and socioeconomic status. Focus groups were conducted either in-person or via a secure online platform and were led by a trained research assistant. Qualitative data analysis was accomplished through thematic analysis and combing of field notes and audio-recording transcripts for keywords (i.e., mental health, stress, anxiety, depression, suicide, etc.). Results: After preliminary analysis, themes of anxiety, increased depression, as well as suicidal ideation and loneliness were seen to be shared amongst different demographics across the state. Adult participants expressed concern for younger generations regarding mental health and substance abuse. Stigma surrounding testing and a positive result increased insecurities spurring people to lie to employers and friends. Communities with close-knit familiar cultures suffered from isolation creating loneliness and negative coping mechanisms. Further examination of transcripts will be conducted to explore additional factors affecting SARS-CoV-2 at-home testing in South Carolina.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 31

Hu, Andy Alberg, Anthony The Age of Initiation of Vaping and Association with Vaping Intensity and Risk of Combustible Tobacco Cigarette Smoking
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Abstract Text

Background - Studies have shown that e-cigarettes are unsafe for consumption due to harmful substances inhaled such as nicotine, heavy metals, volatile organic compounds, and ultrafine particles. The prevalence of vaping among adolescents and young adults has been increasing, but little attention has been paid to whether earlier age of initiation leads to more frequent use of e-cigarettes (“vaping intensity”) and increased likelihood of progressing to cigarette smoking. Purpose - This paper examined published research studies on the topic of the age of initiation of vaping in relation to 1) vaping intensity among adolescents and young adults and 2) risk of smoking combustible tobacco cigarettes (“traditional cigarettes”). This research tested the hypothesis that an earlier age of initiation was associated with increased vaping intensity and increased risk for combustible tobacco cigarette smoking. Methods - A systematic review was performed by ascertaining, analyzing and interpreting peer-reviewed articles. PubMed’s MEDLINE database was used to find peer-reviewed academic articles containing keywords related to the research question. These articles were filtered based on inclusion criteria of containing the research question, being in English, and full-text availability. This data was organized in evidence tables to synthesize the evidence on this topic. Results - Cross-sectional and longitudinal studies were the most common article in the review. 8 study designs were included in the review. Results show that the age of vaping initiation has been linked to higher rates of vaping intensity and smoking initiation. Conclusion - This review examined the relationship between the age of vaping initiation and the vaping intensity among adolescents and young adults. Findings confirmed the hypothesis that a younger age of initiation would lead to worse outcomes of vaping intensity and cigarette smoking initiation. The implications of these findings are that future public health interventions can focus their efforts on decreasing exposure of young people to e-cigarette products to prevent further increases in prevalence and intensity.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 37

Mott, Sarah Wood, Susan
Harrington, Evelynn
Pope, Brittany
Estradiol Promotes Social Stress Susceptibility in Female Rats in a Region- and CRF-Specific Manner
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Abstract Text

Repeated exposure to social stress is a common risk factor for anxiety disorders. Women are twice as likely as men to suffer from anxiety. This increased susceptibility in females is confined between the onset of puberty and the end of menopause, suggesting that ovarian hormones may contribute to this disproportionate development of stress-related anxiety disorders. We have previously shown that witness stress (WS), a model of social stress in which a female rat is subjected to witnessing a social defeat encounter between a male intruder and a male resident, produces anxiety-like behaviors selectively in intact, cycling female rats. Moreover, intact females, but not OVX, exposed to WS exhibit a distinct increase in corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) expression in CeA. The current study seeks to understand specific 17-β estradiol (17-βE)-induced neural regulation that may contribute to heightened susceptibility to social stress among females to identify a druggable target to promote stress resilience. Following recovery from OVX or sham surgery, female rats were treated with 17-β estradiol (17-βE, 10μg/rat, s.c.) or vehicle (veh, 0μg/rat, s.c.). One hour after injection, female rats were exposed to WS or control handling and video-recorded for 15 minutes. Witness stress-evoked behaviors were quantified to assess stress-induced anxiety-like responses. To quantify CRF expression, frozen brains were sliced coronally, immunohistochemistry was conducted, and brains were double labeled for CRF and cFos in stress-sensitive regions. Behavioral responses were shown to be regulated by 17-βE; WS-evoked burying in intact females was decreased by OVX and reinstated by 17-βE. There was no effect of WS or 17-βE on freezing or rearing behaviors. cFos positive CRF expression in the CeA was robustly enhanced by 17-βE during WS, but not control. This effect was not globally observed; there was no effect of WS or 17-βE on cFos expression in CRF positive neurons within PVN or hippocampus. Together, these findings suggest an interaction between 17-βE and CRF is paramount in facilitating anxiety-like responses to WS. Support provided by R01 MH113892 and by the UofSC Magellan Scholar and Magellan Mini-Grant Programs.

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 61

Abdow, Amanda Sophocleous, Maria How Shadowing Directed my Future in Medicine
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During the past summer (Summer 2021), I interned at a local pediatric office back in my home state of Maryland. During the internship, I followed around medical students from George Washington University and Georgetown University that were at the office for their pediatric clinical rotation, assisting them with scribing the patient’s history before we would report to the doctors. I participated in this internship for a few reasons, the biggest being to gain some clinical experience in medicine before I apply to medical school. However, even though I could of chosen to get clinical hours in many different specialties, I decided to find an internship opportunity that involved working with kids in medicine because I have a long history of working with kids both with cognitive disorder through a non-profit called Devenio and having been a camp counselor for 7 years.I knew I loved working with children and wanted to explore if that’s something I wanted to continue doing with medicine in my future. After my internship was over, I had discovered that I did truly want to work with both kids and medicine in my future and this discovery also led me to narrowing my search for research when I got back to school to research that involved children.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 201

Cheung, Candice Gower, Michael ATRA-loaded PLG microparticles to direct macrophage regenerative function
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Statement of Purpose: During muscle repair, macrophages play a significant role in establishing a local environment that supports muscle growth. Macrophages achieve this by releasing factors that induce muscle growth, including insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF1). All-trans-Retinoic Acid is a small molecule that has an established effect on muscle growth and influences macrophage phenotype but has a short half-life in physiological conditions. We show that ATRA can be incorporated into biodegradable poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLG) microparticles for extended delivery to macrophages and naïve muscle cells, improving myotube formation and muscle growth. Methods: ATRA was encapsulated within PLG microspheres using a single emulsion evaporation technique. Particles were differentially centrifuged to obtain particles 2µm in diameter, frozen, then lyophilized overnight. RAW264.7 murine macrophages were incubated with ATRA-loaded particles for 24 hours. The “conditioned” media is collected for IGF1 content analysis and subsequent experiments. To elucidate from macrophage- and particle-only effects, media alone, macrophages alone, and particles alone were incubated in complete media for 24 hours to generate conditioned media controls. C2C12 myoblasts were treated and differentiated into myotubes for 4 days using the collected conditioned medias. After 4 days of differentiation, formed myotubes are fixed and stained for myosin heavy chain. Image analysis is conducted to quantify differences in myotube growth and formation. Primary murine macrophages were treated with fluorescent particles for 8 days, fixed, and stained for actin. Results: ATRA was successfully incorporated into biodegradable poly(lactide-co-glycolide) microparticles and induced an increase in media-levels of IGF1 from RAW264.7 macrophages by 3.1-fold compared to untreated cells (p

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Columbia Ballroom (CMCC upper level)
 Poster: 19

McKenzie, Patrick
Fellers, Ashley
Goodman, Chris The Importance of Clarity and Accessibility: Examining Patient Declines in a Free, Hispanic-serving Clinic during the COVID-19 Pandemic
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In the United States, the COVID-19 pandemic exposed preexisting social and health disparities among historically marginalized populations. Hispanic populations in the U.S. face the lowest rate of medical health insurance coverage of all ethnic groups and frequently face language barriers and immigration status concerns in health care settings, issues which were only exacerbated by the pandemic (Gil et al., 2020). Good Samaritan Clinic (GSC), a free clinic largely serving the uninsured Hispanic population in the Columbia, SC area, witnessed a dramatic decline in patient volume during the early COVID-19 pandemic. During this time, the clinic had moved to virtual care. The goals of our project were twofold: to investigate the primary drivers of this reduction and to suggest outreach initiatives to alleviate these barriers. To do so, we conducted 13 semi-structured interviews with randomly selected GSC patients who had visited the clinic from March 2019 to March 2020. These interviews focused on barriers preventing access to medical care and avoidance of medical care due to the pandemic. Interviewed patients most often reported uncertainty of clinic hours and difficulties accessing virtual care. To mitigate these concerns, we mapped the addresses of all GSC patients during the same period, aggregating the data to the census tract level for anonymity. Using these maps, we created a list of businesses and community organizations within the census tracts and around clusters with the highest patient populations to target with promotional campaign materials. We also created a list of policy suggestions for GSC to further address the concerns of patients and to expand the reach of the clinic in the future. Our findings emphasize the importance of health care administrators making any changes to clinic procedures both clear and accessible, particularly when dealing with patient populations with limited access to technology and difficult financial circumstances.

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Columbia Ballroom (CMCC upper level)
 Poster: 6

Boone, Logan Young, Hannah
Ellison, Carolyn
Utilization of Heparin Intravenous Continuous Infusions at a Multi-Site Inpatient Facility
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Presentation Objective: Identify appropriate UFH continuous infusion dosing for common indications. Background/Purpose: Unfractionated heparin (UFH) is an anticoagulant utilized in the critically ill, medical, and surgical inpatient populations. Patients who receive an inappropriate intensity of UFH continuous infusion based on indication may be at risk of adverse events, including clotting (if under anticoagulated) or bleeding (if over anticoagulated). UFH is recognized by the Institute for Safe Medication Practices as a high alert medication, or a medication that has a heightened risk of causing significant harm when used in error. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the frequency that the correct UFH continuous infusion intensity is ordered for specific indications, and to identify opportunities to improve the current process if needed. Methodology: A retrospective chart review was performed among 16 inpatient facilities within Prisma Health between May 2021 and August 2021. Included patients were ≥ 18 years old and received UFH for venous thromboembolism, mechanical heart valve, atrial fibrillation, or acute coronary syndrome. Patients were excluded if they received UFH for another indication, received subcutaneous UFH, or UFH was not documented as given. Results and conclusions will be presented with the final poster

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Columbia Ballroom (CMCC upper level)
 Poster: 124

Wolfe, Atticus Harrison, Sayward
Henderson, Andrea
TRANSforming the Carolinas: Qualitative and Quantitative Survey Findings on Structural Violence for Transgender People Living in the Southern United States
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From 2019 to 2021, we conducted a multi-stage study (TRANSforming the Carolinas) designed to identify barriers to HIV prevention and treatment for transgender people in North Carolina and South Carolina. The long-term goal of the study is to develop new models of care for transgender people in the southern United States (US) who experience high levels of marginalization and mistreatment in healthcare. Methods: Using local community networks, we recruited transgender adults (N=124) to participate in a self-administered, electronic survey with quantitative and qualitative elements. The survey included items on HIV risk and testing, health behaviors, community barriers, and facilitators. Importantly, the survey also collected information on experiences of stigma and discrimination, participant priorities, and access to gender-affirming care. Participants’ responses to sociodemographic items were analyzed for descriptive purposes, while qualitative survey data were analyzed thematically to characterize participant experiences. Results: Among survey respondents who provided demographic data (n=124), 40.5% were white, 34.9% were Black, and 11.1% were Hispanic/Latinx. Respondents had a mean age of 32 years (range=18-81 years). Respondents reported numerous structural barriers to care in their qualitative responses, including lack of health care access and affordability, housing and food insecurity, and transportation challenges. They also reported barriers to care that were centered in their transgender identity such as medical mistreatment, provider discomfort, and lack of competent care. Most importantly, respondents rated their priorities, revealing strong concern with social determinants of health, including transportation and health care system infrastructures. Conclusions: This research provides insight into the experiences of transgender people in the southern US and illuminates intersectional individual-level and community-level barriers experienced by this population that influence HIV prevention and care. Context-specific assessments for vulnerable and historically marginalized populations provide insight into the structural barriers and institutional treatment that prevent or facilitate HIV prevention and treatment. For transgender people in the southern US, additional measures should be taken to address ancillary concerns such as transportation, medical costs, provider accessibility, care acceptability, and housing and food insecurity.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Columbia Ballroom (CMCC upper level)
 Poster: 12

Fuller, Morgan Zarrett, Nicole
Stodden, David
Am I Fit? The Relationship Between Identity Profiles, Motor Development, and Physical Health in Youth
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Many scholars have focused on increasing positive health behaviors in youth. However, despite the importance of identity development during adolescence, less attention has been paid to the specific role of identity in this area. With previous research on identity’s motivational aspects, the purpose of this study is to examine the ways in which key person-level factors underlying it–perceived competence, affect, persistence/effort, enjoyment, and value–result in distinct profiles of youth with differing levels of fitness-identity and whether they differentially impact physical health behaviors and outcomes. Using hierarchical cluster analysis, we first identified common fitness-identity profiles that emerged within a diverse sample of youth (n=234; 47.4% female; M age= 13.5, range = 10-18yrs; 29.5% African American or Multiracial, 10% Hispanic). Regression analyses were then used to examine the relations between profiles and both adjusted body mass index and fitness level measured by the PACER test. All analyses controlled for age, gender, ethnicity, and actual motor skills, given evidence on the influence these factors have on identity and health behaviors/outcomes. Last, interaction terms were added to examine whether gender and age moderate the relations between identity and health outcomes, given girls are at a higher risk for low levels of PA and that differences in age reflect different developmental periods. Understanding these relations will help clarify the impact that interpersonal components involved in fitness-identity have on physical health behaviors and outcomes. Findings can be used to determine whether PA interventions can benefit from specifically targeting identity-related variables alongside motor skills, and ways to best tailor identity-based interventions based on variations in youth psychosocial needs by age and gender.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Columbia Ballroom (CMCC upper level)
 Poster: 4

Lytle, Isabelle Chruszcz, Maksymillian Interactions of β-Lactam Antibiotics-Transition Metal Complexes with β-Lactamase
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Antibiotic resistance has become more prevalent in bacteria over the years which has proven to be of major concern for human health. β-lactam antibiotics (BLAs), such as penicillin, are some of the most commonly used antibiotics today (Drawz, 2010). However, BLAs have become increasingly less effective because of antibiotic resistance in bacteria. One major case of antibiotic resistance is seen in Staphylococcus aureus. The use of penicillin to treat Staphylococcus aureus started in the 1940’s, however, by 1950 over 50% of strains were resistant to penicillin (Fuda et al., 2005). One of the most common methods of antibiotic resistance against BLAs is the production of β-lactamase (Fuda et al., 2005). β-lactamases cleave the amide bond in β-lactam rings via protonation and hydrolysis (Wang et al., 2017). A cleaved β-lactam ring results in an ineffective, or clinically compromised antibiotic because it can no longer inhibit the synthesis of the cell wall to kill the bacterium (Wang et al., 2017). Dr. Chruszcz’s lab, we` speculate that the use of BLAs in complex with transition metals can result in more effective antibiotics (Möhler et al., 2016). However, the mechanism of how transition metals increase the efficacy of BLAs is unknown. Protein purification, size exclusion chromatography, gel electrophoresis, enzyme kinetics, and crystallography were performed to examine the mechanistic and kinetic effects silver and zinc have on β-lactamase while using nitrocefin substrate. It was determined that 5 uM and 10 uM of silver nitrate shows some degree of inhibition of 20 nM β-lactamase determined through Michaelis Menten kinetics. Crystallization of β-lactamase-metal complexes is still underway; however, X-ray diffraction has shown promising results of potential crystal protein structures. Knowing the specific structure of the enzyme-metal complex sheds light on where exactly the metal binds, and the inhibition mechanism occurs. Further experimentation will be done on zinc and other transition metals with β-lactamase, as well as using crystallography to determine the crystal structure of these complexes. Creation of metal-antibiotic complexes may be an effective way to restore the antimicrobial function of BLAs if inhibition is well established.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 130

Stenger, Caleigh Kubickova, Marketa Navigating Leadership Through Professional Franchises in the Sports Industry
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The first practicum, SPTE 295, was designed to introduce students to a specific field in which they wish to pursue a career. In the summer of 2022, I joined TPC Potomac, a PGA golf course in Maryland, as an intern with goals to take on a larger role. I had taken an interest in the merchandise operation and purchasing and receiving in the golf shop. Since it is a PGA course, there were strict guidelines and brands that needed to be followed and I found myself enjoying the business side of golf and learning how to navigate from a large professional organization. I became creative in my problem solving, took on more responsibility ordering products for the shop and as a result, my Head Professional recognized my work and offered me a more permanent position with the club. Now two years later, upon graduation, I will be returning to TPC Potomac as the Full-Time Merchandiser. The same week as Graduation, we will be hosting the Wells Fargo Championship at our course. I had been given the opportunity to work with PGA Tour Headquarters to produce a Merchandise Tent at the Championship. This goes to show that my experiences from my college and classes gave me the confidence that I now use everyday in my work ethic and in just the two years I’ve been with the club, I have learned how to develop my leadership skills and leverage it to my success. My presentation will discuss my professional evolution in conjunction with my classroom experiences that shaped me into the leader that I am growing to be in the industry.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 175

Swanson, Jake Dudycha, Jeffry The effects of differences in light color and nutrient availability on freshwater plankton communities
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Lakes and ponds have been undergoing shifts in their light and nutrient environments. Increasing amounts of colored organic matter are being deposited into these systems, leading to changes in what colors of light are available to aquatic organisms. Eutrophication, the process by which a body of water becomes enriched with nutrients, is also increasing, leading to lakes and ponds having more nutrients available to organisms. These changes in light color and nutrient availability are particularly important to freshwater plankton communities. Phytoplankton, the primary producers of aquatic food webs, absorb light and use it to fix carbon via photosynthesis. Phytoplankton cannot absorb all colors of light, therefore, changes in light color in lakes and ponds affects the abundance and diversity within the phytoplankton community. Phytoplankton communities can also change in response to nutrient availability, particularly nitrogen and phosphorus. Phosphorus availability is of particular import in freshwaters because it is generally the nutrient that limits phytoplankton growth. Taken together, it is clear that changes in light color and nutrient availability can interact to affect freshwater phytoplankton community diversity and abundance. These changes can also have indirect effects on other organisms in the aquatic food web. Zooplankton are animals that prey on phytoplankton. This consumption is essential to moving energy through the food web. Any changes in light color and nutrient availability that alter phytoplankton communities, therefore, have the potential to impact the zooplankton that are feeding upon the phytoplankton. Investigating how changes in light color and nutrient availability affect freshwater phytoplankton communities, and linking those changes to zooplankton higher up in aquatic food webs, is critical to determining how freshwater plankton communities will respond to future shifts in their light and nutrient environment.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Pastides Alumni Center Ballroom 1a
Time: 9:35 

Perin, Darcy Bourbonnais, Annie Local-scale variability in nitrogen loss from dissolved gas measurements in the Eastern Tropical North Pacific Oxygen Deficient Zone
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Dissolved gases (N2/O2/Ar) are used as tracers for primary productivity and respiration processes throughout marine and freshwater environments. More specifically, N2/Ar is a tracer of N removal occurring through denitrification and anammox. Denitrification is the sequential conversion of bioavailable nitrogen to N2 gas and anammox is the oxidation of ammonium and nitrite to N2 gas. Both processes are restricted to low-O2 or anoxic waters. Nitrogen is an essential macronutrient limiting phytoplankton growth in most of the ocean, thus the balance between nitrogen input by N2 fixation and sinks directly impacts marine primary productivity. Most of the nitrogen is lost in three major Oxygen Deficient Zones (ODZ)s located in the eastern, north, and south Pacific Ocean as well as the Arabian Sea. ODZs are currently expanding which will likely impact the global ocean’s nitrogen budget. We measured N2/Ar ratio and the 15N of N2 by membrane inlet and isotope ratio mass spectrometry at 8 stations in the Eastern Tropical North Pacific, within the ODZ in December 2020. We calculated biogenic N from our N2/Ar measurements, which represents the net N2 added by denitrifying microbes in ODZ waters. We will interpret the observed differences in N-loss between stations in relation to submesoscale features as identified by chlorophyll intrusions and physical circulation.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Columbia Ballroom (CMCC upper level)
 Poster: 25

Pepper, Sydney Wirth, Michael
Dawson, Robin
The Relationship Between Work Engagement, Depression, Anxiety, and COVID-19 Anxiety in Physician Assistant Students
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Physician assistants are mid-level medical practitioners that are responsible for a variety of tasks, all performed under the supervision of a physician. As healthcare workers, physician assistants (PAs) are subject to dangerous levels of burnout, depressive symptoms, and anxiety, especially in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic, which can negatively impact quality of care and patient outcomes. The goal of this study was to characterize burnout, depressive symptoms, and anxiety in current PA students and examine the relationship between these factors and work engagement. Forty-two students were surveyed from eighteen different physician assistant programs across North and South Carolina. Questionnaires included the Utrecht Work Engagement Scale, the Patient Health Questionnaire, the General Anxiety Disorder scale, and the COVID-19 Anxiety Scale. Linear regression was used to assess associations. Overall, results showed a strong negative association between anxiety levels and both the vigor aspect of work engagement (β=-0.50, p=

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 26

Morrissey, Josephine Lynn, Mary K.
Nolan, Melissa
Soil-Transmitted Helminths in the USA: a Review of Five Common Parasites and Future Directions for Avenues of Enhanced Epidemiologic Inquiry
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Katie Lynn, Melissa Nolan, Josephine Morrissey*, and Donaldson F. Conserve *presenting author Soil-transmitted helminths (STHs) are one of the top neglected tropical diseases across the globe. They are a type of gastrointestinal parasite which can survive as ova (eggs) for extended periods of time within soil and can infect humans through several routes of transmission. The focus of this review was to introduce an extensive investigation of five specific intestinal STHs of global health significance that may continuously blight low-income and rural areas of the United States and highlight the urgency for further epidemiologic surveillance of these infections, as they primarily affect our country’s most vulnerable groups. STHs cause significant morbidity, especially in vulnerable and underserved groups, as well as allowing for the perpetuation of poverty and sub-optimal quality of life among these susceptible populations. Because STHs are most commonly endemic in areas of poverty lacking adequate access to healthcare, human infections in middle and high-income countries are at an increased risk of underdiagnosis. However, the United States is not immune to poverty. Autochthonous infections are thought to be rare in the USA; however, STHs were once extremely common across much of the United States specifically within the southern regions and Appalachia, yet widespread surveillance diminished after 1980. Despite this, in recent years there have been multiple reports from family-owned farms and impoverished rural or urban areas displaying evidence of persisting helminth infections across specific sub-populations. In conclusion, thorough surveillance of STHs across the nation needs to begin to promote health equity across the USA.

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 31

Lee, Dorathea Schumpert, Charles Less Gatekeeping, More Girlbosses: Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion in STEM Higher Education
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Recently there has been a spotlight on the issue of diversity, equity, and inclusion in higher education, particularly in STEM fields. In the last twenty years, college enrollment of underrepresented minorities (URM) has increased anywhere from 6-14%, but the STEM workforce and doctoral programs are seriously lacking. In 2019, 73% of all STEM workers were male, and 87% of STEM PhDs were non-URM. A survey of 700+ UofSC undergraduates was conducted to understand challenges that may prevent URM from pursuing careers or higher education in STEM. When asked if they thought UofSC was a diverse campus, 92% of white students responded positively versus 59% of non-white students. Students were asked if they thought they would face discrimination in their future career based on race/ethnicity, gender identity, or sexuality. The majority was compared to the minority in all categories. There was a significant difference in each, but particularly in race/ethnicity, where 64% of the minority responded “yes”. There is a collective consciousness of the difficulties for URM in STEM, but without institutional awareness and support they are discouraged from pursuing it. Based on policies developed by other universities and the needs expressed in the survey, 4 recommendations were outlined. 1) Increase URM recruitment to diversify campus demographics. 2) Create an initiative to highlight/hire minority faculty to provide visible role models for minorities in their field. URMs representation in positions of power/importance is essential for students’ continued success in STEM. 3) Increase financial support for URM to promote enrollment in master’s and PhD programs. 4) Institute an official policy of university-wide inclusion with clearly outlined repercussions for transgressions. Hateful rhetoric and direct violations of the Carolina Creed will not be tolerated to protect the safety and rights of all students. Overall, survey found there is a clear concern about discrimination in STEM and that issues of diversity, equity, and inclusion are important to students of all backgrounds. A diverse and inclusive student body encourages URM to enroll and pursue their goals, and we will continue to push for inclusion in all aspects of STEM here at UofSC.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 10

Royals, Carrington Bookstaver, P. Brandon
Barfield, Reagan K.
Incorporating guideline-directed therapies for diabetes into a rural Federally Qualified Health Center formulary to reduce utilization of sulfonylureas within an underinsured population
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Authors/Affiliations: Carrington Royals, PharmD1,2; Reagan K. Barfield, PharmD1,3; Lori T. Mor, PharmD2,4; Mary Francis Newman, PharmD2; Logan Tate Cook, PharmD Candidate1;P. Brandon Bookstaver, PharmD1,3 1University of South Carolina College of Pharmacy, Columbia, SC; 2Tandem Health, Sumter, SC; 3Prisma Health Richland, Columbia, SC; 4Prisma Health Tuomey, Sumter, SC Background: Sulfonylureas (SU) have lost favorability in the treatment of type II diabetes mellitus (T2DM)but remain a mainstay of therapy for many patients due to financial concerns. The purpose of this study is to determine the prescribing patterns of SU at a Federally Qualified Health Center (FQHC) following a formulary addition of three guideline-directed therapies (GDT)to a discounted list for patients requiring financial assistance. Methods: A retrospective cohort study was completed for patients prescribed a SU at Tandem Health between July 1, 2021 – September 30, 2021, prior to any recent updates to the discounted medication list. Formulary additions were made in October 2021 and providers were informed via email and flyer. Patients on a SU who met pre-determined criteria (primarily socio-economic factors) for discounted GDT were identified and their provider was offered patient-specific recommendations by a pharmacist. One month following the recommendations another evaluation was conducted to determine the proportion of accepted recommendations. Results: Of the 1,233 patients filling prescriptions at Tandem Health pharmacy with a T2DM diagnosis, 184 patients (14.9%) were actively prescribed a SU. Of these patients,92.4% were classified as overweight or obese, and over 28.8% of patients were 65 or older. Seventy-five (40.8%) patients met pre-determined criteria for eligibility to receive discounted GDT. One month following the pharmacist recommendations, only 16 patients were seen in office and three of these (18.8%) were initiated on a new formulary option. Conclusions: Considering the relatively low-income population at the FQHC, prescribing of SU was less than expected. Providers are taking advantage of the 340B discounted medications and providing patients with the best GDT for T2DM they can afford. The addition of three guideline-directed medications to the discounted T2DM list will continue to aid in affordability of GDT.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Columbia Ballroom (CMCC upper level)
 Poster: 138

Anderson, Destinee Michalos, Alexis State Politics and its Application to International Relations
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In the spring semester of my junior year, I was accepted as an intern at Hannah News Service. Hannah News provides statehouse news and legislative software to organizations monitoring, lobbying, and impacting state government (hannahnews.com). In my position, I am able to observe committee meetings and floor sessions at the State House in which I transcribe for the database. As a political science major at the University of South Carolina, this internship is allowing me the opportunity to witness my chosen pathway at work. It is one thing to learn about the legislative process in my political science classes; however, it’s much different to see the tedious process of a bill being passed or a budget being approved. My time at Hannah News has confirmed my passion for the political process and being a part of problem-solving for not only my state but for the global community. In participating in this internship, I understand the importance of cooperation that pertains to global politics as well as state politics. Additionally, I hope to utilize this experience fully in my future career endeavors in international relations.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 235

Leith, Gabrielle Shustova, Natalia Covalent-Organic Frameworks: A Versatile Platform for Tailoring Donor-Acceptor Alignment
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Exploring the potential of strong electron-acceptors, e.g., corannulene, 7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquinodimethane, and fullerene has led to unforeseen revelations,1,2 particularly when combining their renowned properties with those of hierarchical extended structures.3,4 The ability to merge the intrinsic properties of two- and three-dimensional acceptors (TCNQ, corannulene, or fullerene-based derivatives) with the inherent properties of crystalline covalent-organic frameworks (COFs) portends an avenue for preparation of a novel class of multidimensional and multifunctional crystalline porous materials.3–5 The rigid structure of a COF can promote donor-acceptor (D-A) alignment through covalent tethering, that could be challenging to achieve non-coordinatively, and potentially promote directional charge transport and energy transfer, and as a result, enhance device performance.4,5 This presentation will survey our progress towards the development of crystalline porous D-A COFs possessing tunable electronic properties.3,4 Our results demonstrate the first steps toward utilizing crystalline scaffolds for enhancing the electronic properties with the potential to address current challenges in a number of areas, including optoelectronics and lithium ion batteries.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Columbia Ballroom (CMCC upper level)
 Poster: 62

Alkhatib, Bailey Sides, Andrew Peeling, painful, pancreatic insufficiency… and psoriasiform dermatitis?
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Psoriasiform dermatitis is an intersection between atopic dermatitis and psoriasis. Atopic dermatitis is characterized by a T helper 2 cell shifted immunity, skin barrier defect, and pruritus. Upregulation of T helper 17 cells and subsequent cytokine production stimulates keratinocytes forming the characteristic erythematous plaques seen in psoriasis. Research suggests psoriasiform dermatitis has both T helper type 17 and type 2 components. Diagnosis is usually via biopsy following refractory atopic dermatitis, and patients are resistant to topical therapies. A 52-year-old female with chronic pancreatitis due to alcohol abuse, partial gastrectomy, severe protein malnutrition, and psoriasiform dermatitis presented to the emergency department following an outpatient visit concerning for intractable pain from increasing bilateral lower extremity swelling with clear drainage and desquamation. Initial onset was one year ago, and her condition progressed over the last 3-4 months. Punch biopsy 5 months prior indicated acanthosis with overlying confluent parakeratosis possibly consistent with psoriasiform dermatitis. Previously prescribed topical steroids reportedly worsened the rash. Clotrimazole nor emollients proved efficacious. She had no exposure to medications associated with Steven-Johnson Syndrome. Review of systems was negative except reported chronic diarrhea. She was treated for possible cellulitis, and blood cultures remained negative. X-rays were unremarkable for osteomyelitis, septic arthritis, or necrotizing infection. Clostridiodes difficile was negative, and abdominal imaging showed pancreatic calcifications. Nutritional work up revealed deficiencies in magnesium, thiamine, zinc, potassium, and pyridoxine. Chronic diarrhea resolved with vitamin, mineral, and pancreatic enzyme supplementation. Since discharge, patient has followed-up with primary care and GI. Labs indicated severe pancreatic insufficiency, normal tissue transglutaminase, and SPEP with abnormal protein pattern. Skin biopsy demonstrated psoriasiform epidermal hyperplasia. Her bilateral lower extremities exhibited areas of hyperpigmentation with a small superficial sore with no obvious erythema or infectious areas. Patient had continued diarrhea and was prescribed cholestyramine 4 g BID. The patient reported subjective improvement in her rash likely secondary to appropriate repletion of zinc, thiamine, and vitamin D. This case report highlights a pensive presentation, underscores the importance of nutrition, identifies the role of biopsy, and elucidates the need for appropriate outpatient management.

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Columbia Ballroom (CMCC upper level)
 Poster: 129

Hess, Andrew
Cooper, Dylan
Taylor, Rodney
Kim, Julian
Oncologic Benefit of Elective Deck Dissection in Clinically N0 Primary Major Salivary Gland Malignancies
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As a result of the relative rarity and broad histopathology of primary malignancies of the major salivary glands, there are no clinical trials that provide evidence as to whether an elective neck dissection (END) contributes to better outcomes in the absence of clinical nodal metastases. In this large study, we intend to evaluate the benefit of performing an END when treating these malignancies. Our study is a retrospective national database evaluation of primary major salivary gland malignancies treated from 2004-2015. We evaluated 4,101 entries of patients treated for primary major salivary gland malignancy who showed no clinical evidence of cervical metastases. Our outcomes were 5-year overall survival (OS) and disease specific survival (DSS) for individuals who underwent resection of a major salivary gland malignancy and either an END or observation for the management of their disease. Subgroup analyses of DSS were performed for tumor grade, stage and risk stratified histopathology. In our analysis we controlled for age, sex, race, tumor location, stage, grade, risk stratified histopathology, and radiation treatment status. Our population included 4101 unique patients with a median decile age between 50-59; 52.1% were male, 79.5% were Caucasian, 50.5% received radiation, and 47.5% underwent an END. The 5-year OS and DSS for those receiving an END when compared to observation was OS: HR=0.897, p=0.16 and DSS: HR=0.946, p=0.612. Subgroup analyses demonstrated a statistically significant difference in DSS for T1 staged malignancies (HR=0.51, p=0.037) and for poorly differentiated and undifferentiated malignancies (HR=0.741, p=0.045). When compared to observation, performing an END failed to provide a benefit in 5-year OS and DSS for clinically N0 primary major salivary gland malignancies in a large population of patients. However, subgroup analyses of END proved to be beneficial for T1, poorly differentiated, and undifferentiated malignancies.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Columbia Ballroom (CMCC upper level)
 Poster: 111

Cooper, Dylan Vidrine, D. Macy Floor of Mouth Schwannoma in a Teenage Patient: A Case Report
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Schwannomas are slow growing, benign nerve sheath neoplasms presenting most commonly in the sixth decade of life. They can originate from any myelinated nerve with Schwann cells, though they typically arise from the vestibular portion of the eighth cranial nerve. Contrary to their typical presentation, this is a case report of a life-long schwannoma arising in the floor of the mouth of a 16-year-old patient. This adolescent Caucasian male presented to clinic with a life-long nodule on the left side in the floor of the mouth that had enlarged over the previous month. The patient denied pain or drainage and there were no signs of difficulty swallowing, speaking, or chewing. On clinical examination, a 2-3 cm non-fluctuant, non-tender mass was found, lateral to the submandibular duct opening and deep to the sublingual fold. Overlying oral mucosa showed no discoloration. The mass felt firm but mobile and lacked any osseous traits. The surface was smooth with regular margins and did not extend into the tongue. Computerized tomography with contrast was performed, which revealed its location as deep to the mylohyoid and geniohyoid muscles while it medially displaced the left genioglossus muscle. Radiographic findings suggested ranula as the favored etiology though clinically the mass was most similar to a dermoid cyst. The patient was taken to the operating room and the mass was removed via an intraoral approach under general anesthesia. Grossly, the mass was found to be encapsulated and highly mobile and was excised without complication. Clinically, it lacked lingual nerve involvement. The red-tan colored mass was homogenous, rubbery and did not appear cystic. The specimen was sent to pathology where it was identified to be a benign schwannoma. The patient was seen for post operative care where they reported no muscular or sensory deficits. This unusual case discusses a floor of the mouth mass in an adolescent patient. Although it is less common than a ranula or dermoid cyst, it illustrates the need to keep schwannoma in the differential diagnosis with excisional biopsy as treatment.

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Columbia Ballroom (CMCC upper level)
 Poster: 118

Patel, Megha Chruszcz, Maksymilian
Hernandez Arriaza, Ricardo
Production of Recombinant Lymphocyte Antigen 6 Proteins, Potential Targets for Cancer Cell Death
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Abstract Text

The lymphocyte antigen 6 gene (Ly6) family of proteins are involved in cell proliferation, macrophage activation, and immune cell maturation. Their location on chromosome 8q24 is frequently amplified in human cancer, and the increased expression of these proteins is associated with poor outcomes in ovarian, colorectal, breast, bladder, and pancreatic cancer. Furthermore, ovarian cancer often goes undetected which leads to its fatality and difficulty to treat, while colorectal and pancreatic cancer are the second and third leading causes of cancer death in the United States. The increased expression in fatal cancers provides these proteins with the potential of being targets for anti-cancer drugs. Our final goal is determining the structure of Ly6 proteins, which would provide the ability to study how they interact with potential drugs and to better understand their roles in invasive cancer. To do so, the recombinant version of these proteins first need to be successfully expressed and purified. Interestingly, despite belonging to the same protein family, recombinant proteins, Ly6D, Ly6E, and Ly6K, share many differences at the amino acid sequence level. In our research, we developed and optimized procedures to obtain soluble recombinant Ly6D, Ly6E, and Ly6K. Furthermore, in vitro experiments were carried out to characterize their oligomeric states. In silico studies, such as docking, were performed to find small molecules that possess anti-cancer properties to target Ly6D. In addition, two different approaches are simultaneously being carried out to determine the tertiary structure of these proteins, which is our final goal: production of protein crystals to perform X-ray crystallography experiments and production of the 15N labeled version of the proteins to perform NMR experiments.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 137

Patel, Khushi
Rugh, Kayla
Dawson, Robin
Corbett, Cynthia
Raynor, Phyllis
Early Healthcare Communication Skills Training in an Undergraduate Honors Laboratory Course
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Background: Effective healthcare communication is the keystone of interprofessional and patient interactions and an integral domain of the new American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) Essentials. Quality communication is associated with positive health outcomes, patient satisfaction, and treatment plan adherence, underscoring the need to teach effective communication skills to student nurses. While these skills are traditionally taught in foundation or clinical courses, students may benefit from earlier training. Purpose: The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a multipronged approach to teaching communication skills in a didactic, applied laboratory science course. Methods: Students included interdisciplinary honors undergraduate students. Learning outcomes included 1) understanding nature of patient care and importance of interprofessional collaboration; 2) demonstrating the ability to interpret complex information into plain language. Skills training included learning social conversation rules; two-part turn-taking; application of Clear Communication and Plain Language guidelines in developing patient materials; case studies; quizzes; and group projects simulating patient-provider interactions. Qualitative data included anonymous course evaluations from four cohorts (n=45); qualitative data from current nursing students (n=6) and graduate nurses (n=3) previously enrolled in the class. Descriptive statistics were generated using Excel; qualitative data were analyzed using thematic analysis. Results: Overall course evaluations on a scale of 1 to 5 (1=inadequate; 5=excellent) averaged 4.9 and workload was deemed reasonable (average 3.14, 1=hard; 5=easy). Students felt better prepared for healthcare interactions and used the course activities to engage in self-reflection: “it helped me to better understand…my scope of practice and... identify my limitations.” Employed graduates reported being most appreciative of the focus on interprofessional communication, a topic not discussed in other courses. Graduates also “felt extremely prepared to walk in and talk to patients and their families.” Conclusion: Results demonstrate that students recognized the importance of clear communication and learned methods to utilize these skills. Participants reported the interdisciplinary nature allowed them to anticipate how to approach future interprofessional interactions. Introducing good communication practices before clinical entry, and threading it through all health sciences courses, addresses the new AACN Essentials by providing a comprehensive approach to communication skills training

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 32

Smalls, Peyton Ryker, Katherine
Barnes, Jessica
How does learning about scientists influence student ideas about the types of people who do science?
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Geosciences are the least diverse of all the STEM fields. In order to change this, students need to be able to see themselves in it (Schinske et al, 2016). Historically, scientists featured in introductory classes and textbooks are most often white, male, and otherwise non-visible minority identities. Therefore, we created a set of Geoscientist Spotlights in Fall 2021 that feature diverse, non-stereotypical geoscientists and are testing their impact on student ideas about scientists. We had students complete a short answer question (SAQ) at the beginning and end of Spring 2022 describing the types of people who do science. Each week, approximately 120 students read about a scientist’s work; half are also provided with personal information and a picture of the scientist. Responses to the SAQs are categorized using a codebook from Schinske et al. (2015) into categories such as positive/negative stereotypes and fields of science. Preliminary results of the pre-semester data from 70 students indicate that students come into the course with a significant number of positive stereotypes about scientists, most often that they do lab work, wish to discover something, are intelligent and curious. Only one mention of a negative stereotype (asocial) has been uncovered so far. It was applied in the context of describing a scientist as “nerdy.” Counter/non-stereotypes include that scientists can be any type of person, or someone who is analytical, enthusiastic, or fact-based. When stereotypical scientists were identified, the top three were Albert Einstein, Isaac Newton, and Thomas Edison. Non-stereotypical scientists mentioned most often include family members, teachers, or friends. Of the 70 responses analyzed so far, 56 contained positive stereotypes while 22 had non-stereotypes; some submissions included both. The most frequently mentioned fields of science so far are chemistry and geology. Results from the remaining pre-semester responses will be analyzed and presented here. This research matters because in order to diversify the field of geosciences, it starts at these introductory level classes and allows everyone of all backgrounds to feel included in something that they love, as well.

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 127

Jackson, Caden Lownes, Steven
Aziz, Maggie
Global Citizenship and Multicultural Understanding: Do Core Classes Work?
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This research analyzes the institutional strategy of using general education requirements as a means of incorporating multiculturalism and global citizenship components into a general liberal arts curriculum at the University of South Carolina. Through an evaluation of Historical Thinking, Social Sciences, and Foreign Languages courses and their associated learning objectives captured in sample syllabi and interviews with faculty members, the researchers in this session will assess the effectiveness of incorporating diversity, equity, and inclusion principles into the classroom. Suggestions for similar assessments of institutional strategies will be provided.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 9

Holderread, Helen Deweil, David U101 Peer Leadership: Key Takeaways
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Over Fall 2020 and Fall 2021, I served as a University 101 Peer Leader. U101 is a freshman introductory course at UofSC geared towards supporting freshman in their transition from high school to college. A Peer Leader is a current upperclassman student at the university who helps bridge the gap between the professor and students by providing a current student’s perspective. I served as a mentor to 19 freshman students over two different semesters. My role existed both in and out of the classroom. I assisted with the planning and facilitation of lessons while also organizing community building opportunities outside of class. I was motivated to pursue this position as a freshman U101 student. My peer leader Julia inspired me to get involved and make the most out of my college experience through the example she set. Overall, I learned a great deal through this experience. I learned about myself as an individual and a team member, while developing key leadership skills. I built confidence in myself as a facilitator, improved my organization and communication, and learned the importance of feedback for improvement. This experience was meaningful due to the relationships I built with my students, my peers, and all the supporting faculty in the U101 program. Being a U101 Peer leader was part of my legacy at UofSC. I calculated the number of students that were impacted by my involvement as a peer leader and a senior peer leader. The grand total was 418! This doesn’t include the thousands of students impacted by the U101 program itself. It was an honor to be a part of the number one first year experience in the country. I plan to continue developing the skills I gained through this experience as a future member of society, and as I pursue a career in medicine. While I cannot continue my involvement in the program after graduation, I hope to maintain the relationships I built through U101. Overall, I am glad to have had the opportunity to give back to a program that gave so much to me.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 166

Swanson, Jayden Wellman, Denise Lesson Learned by Teaching English in Antigua, Guatemala
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Cultural education has always been a point of interest for me. I acted on this interest in January of 2022. I decided to travel to Antigua, Guatemala to teach English because the things I was learning in my classes about culturally sustainable pedagogy, linguistic diversity, and language acquisition really interested me. With this interest and my passion for personal cultural exchange as motivation, I committed to the experience. I registered to teach English, but I was unsure of the age group of my students as that would be assigned once I arrived in the city. The day before my placement began, I found out I would be teaching two young children (4 and 7 years old). As a preservice teacher hoping to teach upper elementary, this young audience was terrifying. However, during my first day teaching, I found that these children were incredibly adept at picking up vocabulary words and simple sentence structures. They could easily recognize patterns in verb conjugation and pluralization. I learned a very important lesson: children are extremely capable if given an environment without limitations. This is incredibly important—especially when considering my future career as a classroom teacher. This presentation will discuss what I learned in Guatemala, which has shaped my current approaches to creating learning environments and structuring lesson plans.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 170

Julceus, Emmanuel
Ranganathan, Radhika
Longgang, Zhao
Liu, Jihong
Racial differences in association between diabetes and depression among US adult population: The National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2015-2018
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Introduction: Diabetes is continuing to remain a significant chronic health burden as it is the seventh leading cause of death in the United States (US). It is unclear whether race modifies the association between diabetes and depression. Our objective was to examine the modifying role of race/ethnicity status on the association between diabetes and depression using a nationally representative cross-sectional sample of US adults. Methods: We utilized data from the 2015-2018 National Health and Nutrition Examination (NHANES) survey. From our eligible sample of adults ≥ 20 years (n = 7,339), chi-square tests were performed to assess the association between sample characteristics, including diabetes, and clinically relevant depression status (Patient Heath Questionnaire-9 ≥ 10). Multiple logistic regression was used to examine the association of diabetes and depression accounting for various demographic, socioeconomic, clinical, and behavioral factors. Results: The prevalence of clinically relevant depression was 9.49% and diabetes was 13.94%. The prevalence of depression was significantly higher among Non-Hispanic Whites with diabetes compared to non-diabetics (14.27% vs 8.74%, p

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Columbia Ballroom (CMCC upper level)
 Poster: 46

Kocur, Anthony Steet, Richard Functional Assessment of Homozygous ALDH18A1 Variants Reveals Alterations in Amino Acid and Antioxidant Metabolism
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Mono- and biallelic variants in the ALDH18A1 gene cause a spectrum of human disorders associated with variable cutaneous and neurological findings that overlap with cutis laxa and complicated types of spastic paraplegia. ALDH18A1 encodes the bifunctional enzyme pyrroline-5-carboxylate synthetase (P5CS) that plays a role in the de novo biosynthesis of proline and ornithine. While the cutaneous phenotypes in ALDH18A1-related disorders are thought to arise from proline-dependent defects in collagen and elastin biosynthesis, the molecular basis for the neurological features is not fully defined. In this project, we characterize a previously unreported homozygous ALDH18A1 variant (p.Thr331Pro) in four affected probands from two unrelated families, and demonstrate broad-based alterations in amino acid and antioxidant metabolism. These patients presented with developmental delay, neurological deficits, and loose skin, with an overall severity that lies between autosomal recessive cutis laxa type 3 and hereditary spastic paraplegia type 9. Functional characterization of the p.Thr331Pro variant demonstrated a lack of any obvious impact on the steady-state level or mitochondrial localization of the P5CS enzyme. Native gel electrophoresis did, however, suggest a defect in homo-oligomer formation. Using an unlabeled NMR-based metabolomics approach in patient fibroblasts and ALDH18A1-null human embryonic kidney cells expressing the variant P5CS, we identified reduced abundance of glutamate and several metabolites derived from glutamate, including proline and glutathione. Broad-based reduction in the level of several amino acids in the patient cells was noted, likely indicating the need for these cells to convert other amino acids to glutamate in order to replenish glutamate-derived metabolites. Biosynthesis of the polyamine putrescine, derived from ornithine, was also decreased in patient fibroblasts, highlighting the functional consequence on another metabolic pathway involved in antioxidant responses in the cell. Together these findings shed new light on amino acid and antioxidant pathways associated with ALDH18A1-related disorders, and underscore the importance of metabolomic profiling in discovering pathways that impact disease pathogenesis.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Columbia Ballroom (CMCC upper level)
 Poster: 151

Lanier, Jessica
Denkins, Makayla
Borkowski, Sydney
Boggs, Carol ENVR 480: Roadside Pollinator Habitats
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ENVR 480: Roadside Pollinator Habitats This proposal is in response to a request by the National Environmental Education Foundation (NEEF) for proposals to enhance pollinator habitats. The rfp requests that the proposed project in some way creates or enhances habitats for common pollinator species and incorporates community engagement. World-wide, pollinator populations are declining. There are numerous reasons for this decline, some major contributors to this are that pollinators are limited by habitat loss, fragmentation, and degradation. Pollinators are essential for food production and for wild plant species, and creating a space that supports these populations while also acting as a tool to inform the community about their importance would be extremely valuable. Our proposed plan will convert land in between or along state highways into pollinator habitats. Our general strategy is to focus mainly on seasonal, native plant species that support populations of the Apidae bee family that are native to North America. The results from this project will increase the biodiversity along roadways and help to maintain and improve populations of the Apidae bee family, along with other species of pollinators. This project will also bring attention to the importance of native pollinator species to residents of South Carolina through an educational partnership with the South Carolina Department of Transportation (SCDOT) offering information on their website and posters within their offices across the state about the impact of roadside pollinator habitats. This proposed project offers many potential benefits to pollinator species and people alike, giving habitats to essential species that have an impact throughout South Carolina and potentially globally.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 112

Javaheri, Armaan Mujadzic, Mirsad Bilateral Avascular Necrosis of Capitate: A Case Report and Review of Surgical Treatments
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Avascular necrosis of the capitate is an uncommon occurrence that can be a source of wrist pain and reduced range of motion. Due to the rarity of the disorder, the etiology is not well understood. It is proposed that numerous factors can contribute to avascular necrosis such as, but not limited to, macrotrauma, repetitive microtrauma, local or systemic steroids and gout. Moreover, anomalous capitate blood supply can augment these factors and further predispose one to capitate avascular necrosis. Our case of a 27-year-old African American female illustrates a patient with bilateral avascular necrosis of the capitates, which is an even rarer phenomenon with only two previously published cases in the literature. Although plain radiographs can be used to visualize the degenerating structures, MRI with gadolinium is the most specific and sensitive imaging modality to identify necrosis. Initially, conservative non-surgical methods can be used for symptomatic management, including NSAIDs, localized steroid injections and wrist immobilization. If these methods fail, surgical options such as vascularized bone grafts, four-corner arthrodesis and scaphocapitolunate arthrodesis can be used as treatments. It is important to restore carpal heigh and normal carpal alignment to reduce the risk of degenerative disease of the adjacent joints.

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Columbia Ballroom (CMCC upper level)
 Poster: 103

Rehman, Zoe Benton, Sarah What I learned in College, and Why it Matters
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I wanted to get involved in leadership positions during my undergraduate career because I heard it was important. It creates resume boosters and gives you something to talk about in job interviews, but I did not realize how these experiences would shape who I was as a person as well as act as a guide for what I wanted to do in the future. On campus I was able to serve in my sorority as Director of Sisterhood, and later as a Pi Chi in Panhellenic recruitment. Off campus I had the opportunity to shadow several Physician Assistants in the hospital, and work as a Medical Assistant in a pulmonology practice. I was expecting these experiences to be different, as one was something I was doing for fun and the other was something I was doing in preparation for my career. However, I actually found several similarities between the two. The experiences I had within Greek life as well as in the medical field shifted my values and taught me how to be more empathetic, as well as showed me how much I enjoy helping others. I realized how important forming strong relationships is to me, and this helped me pick a career path. I learned that a nervous patient is not very different from an anxious freshman, and I am able to comfort both of these people. I also learned that the working relationship between a doctor, Physician Assistant, and nurse is similar to that of a president, director, and chair, and so I am able to work productively with a group to find solutions. Without my undergraduate leadership experiences I may not have formed these connections. For the next year, I will continue working as a medical assistant and will gain more experience that further inspires my career in medicine. I want to continue to make meaningful personal connections while also learning more about what it means to be a provider. Next summer I will be applying to Physician Assistant school, and I know that I will use what I learned from my leadership opportunities throughout that experience.

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 236

Shavitz, Samantha Ismail, Briahnna Customer Service Interventions and Perceptions
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Being a hospitality management major at the University of South Carolina has given me many opportunities to further my knowledge in this field through internships, school-sponsored events, and learning within the classroom. I have taken advantage of many of these opportunities, and grown as a student and a future hospitality worker by holding many positions that required different levels of customer service and knowledge. I have learned theories and studied research to back my actions upon through multiple classes at UofSC, and applied them in the various positions I have held. Specifically, three experiences I will focus on are my position as a logistics director during Panhellenic Recruitment, my internships at a smaller family owned restaurant, and my job as a waitress at the Masters Tournament. From the most casual customer service during recruitment to the most formal at the Masters, I believe there is much to be said about how to handle certain situations based on the environment you are placed into. In my personal opinion, I believe customer service is the most important aspect of hospitality and should be integrated into every encounter with the customer. If I could put customer service into my own words, I think it means doing whatever you can to make sure the customer is satisfied with their experience, and doing it with a positive and hospitable attitude. Speaking on how customer service differs based upon the environment, I will give a brief look into what different encounters I experienced throughout my various positions held. Customer service during recruitment included accommodating various dietary restrictions throughout 18 meals during recruitment, even if that meant running to the nearby tropical smoothie to make sure every person received what they needed. During my internships, it included being a manager and intervening to solve poor customer service situations, through gift cards, discounts, and deletions. Finally, during the masters it included taking care of each customers unique needs and getting them whatever in my power to make sure they enjoyed themselves. Altogether, each of these positions involved my intervention to satisfy the customer and their perception.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 233

Teshon, Taylor Cox, Jenna An Examination of Purge Reliability in Impella Devices with Multiple Heparin Concentrations
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Presentation Objective: To examine the purge reliability over time in Impella purge solutions containing 12.5 units/mL, 25 units/mL, and 50 units/mL of heparin. Purpose/Background: The Impella catheter is a percutaneously inserted ventricular assist device that increases cardiac output by pumping blood from the left ventricle into systemic circulation. As blood is pumped through the Impella catheter, a purge solution runs countercurrent to the flow of blood to create positive internal purge pressure and to prevent the deposition of protein and thrombus within purge gaps in the catheter. The manufacturer recommends the purge solution contain 25 units/mL of heparin. Previously 50 units/mL was recommended, and many institutions utilize 12.5 units/mL. The purpose of this project is to examine the purge reliability over time in Impella purge solutions containing 12.5 units/mL, 25 units/mL, and 50 units/mL of heparin. Methods: A retrospective study was conducted among all adult patients who were admitted to Prisma Health Richland hospital or Prisma Health Greenville Memorial hospital from January 1, 2012 through July 1, 2021, received mechanical circulatory support with an Impella device, and received a heparin-based purge solution within 24 hours of Impella placement. Patients were excluded if they received the heparin-based purge solution for less than 12 hours. The primary endpoint was purge reliability over time. Impella purge solution was considered unreliable if there was an increase in purge pressure by 25% from index purge pressure or a decrease in purge flow rate by 30% or 50% from index purge flow, dependent on initial flow rate. Secondary endpoints included the use of alteplase in the purge solution as well as the variance in purge flow rate or purge pressures. Results: In Progress Conclusions: In Progress

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Columbia Ballroom (CMCC upper level)
 Poster: 148

Garrett, Brigid Sophocleous, Maria How Sorority Leadership Taught Me The Value of Connection and Experiences
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When I chose to go through recruitment for the College Panhellenic Association on campus, it was because I was searching for a community in a new school and wanted to find ways to get involved with like-minded women. I joined Zeta Tau Alpha and loved every moment of my time there, which made me want to run for a leadership position to help improve the chapter that had already done so much for me. In November 2019 I was elected to serve as Vice President of New Member Education. This was an exciting, but daunting position as it made me responsible for transitioning 150 total women into the chapter, setting up a mentorship process for them, and planning several events, including a bid day event for 400 women. Unfortunately, COVID-19 canceled much of what I had planned, but despite having to work around safety restrictions, I was able to welcome 120 women into our chapter. This experience taught me that true sisterhood is about connection, not bid day parties and social events. It also inspired me to take another smaller position after my executive committee term was over, as Member Experience and Retention Chair. Here I took what I learned about making new members’ experiences meaningful and applied it to upperclassmen. This challenging but rewarding leadership position inspired me to continue to focus on making experiences special, something I hope to continue on with both professionally and in personal relationships.

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 171

Dare, Erin DeWeil, David Greek Lifes positive impact on my time at UofSC
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As an incoming freshman student at the University of South Carolina, I decided to join the recruitment process for the College Panhellenic Association on campus. While I did figure I would make lasting friendships from joining a CPA organization, I did not know how much of a positive impact that Greek Life at the University of South Carolina would have on my leadership abilities, personal growth, and overall college experience. I found a home within my home at university with the women of Zeta Tau Alpha. This organization and the opportunities to serve twice on our executive board as Vice President of Philanthropy and Vice President of Programming allowed me to lead a chapter of 300 girls by creating meaningful programming and philanthropic events that made an impact on each member, our philanthropy, and the greater Columbia community. Outside of my chapter, I have been able to connect with other Greek Life organizations through cross-council programming and initiatives to enhance the programming within Zeta Tau Alpha. These experiences and the people that they have connected me to have allowed me to go from the shy freshman who was so scared to be at such a large university so far away from home to a confident and effective leader who is always looking for a way to give back to the university that has given so much to me. In this presentation, I will address the insights from each of my experiences as a leader within a greek organization, share how they shaped me to be the individual I am today, and why I am confident these experiences have prepared me to begin my post-graduate career.

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 196

Paton, Mariajosé
Harrington, Paris
Harrison, Sayward Youth Participation in HIV Prevention: Lessons Learned from a Systematic Review
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After nearly 10 years of availability of pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) to prevent HIV, challenges in providing access and ensuring medication uptake/adherence remain due to stigma, medical distrust, and racism towards minoritized communities, especially among Black young men who have sex with men (YMSM). Research on racial health disparities has encouraged emic approaches to facilitate research and interventions. Thus, participation of sexual and gender minority (SGM) youth of color in HIV prevention will provide the critical insight necessary to develop effective interventions. The purpose of the current study was to conduct a systematic review synthesizing literature on youth participation in HIV prevention interventions to 1) evaluate challenges related to youth engagement and 2) determine the extent to which efforts yield successful intervention outcomes. Ninety-five articles reporting on 44 unique studies were reviewed using a systematic selection and coding process, with two coders, to extract information about study characteristics (e.g., theoretical orientation, study design, methods, duration), youth participation (e.g., inquiry-involved youth sample size, demographics, participation type, barriers for youth engagement), and study outcomes (e.g., variables measured, primary outcomes, key insights). Youth inquiry was defined as a group of youth who met to contribute to intervention development, selection, and/or delivery. Studies often included small-to-moderate sized groups of youth (i.e., 11-49 youth; n = 13, 29.6%) ages 18-25 (n = 23, 52.3%) who were predominately Black (n = 19, 43.2%) and male (n = 16, 36.4%). Their participation was largely in the form of youth user-centered design (n = 28, 63.6%) and as consultants (n = 21, 47.7%). Only 10 studies reported youth’s sexual identities and/or behaviors, with five (n = 5, 11.4%) including YMSM in intervention efforts. Many of the studies used sexual risk behavior as an intervention outcome (n = 22, 50%), and some saw improvement post-intervention (n = 14, 31.82%). Barriers to youth participation were often unreported (n = 18, 40%), though stigma, heterosexism, homophobia, racism, and ageism against YMSM were noteworthy (n = 7, 15.9%). Overall, findings suggest that SGM youth are underrepresented in studies using youth participatory methods for HIV prevention. Future areas of research and implications are discussed.

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Columbia Ballroom (CMCC upper level)
 Poster: 44

Lynch, William Sweetwood, Rosie Not Built for It: An examination of the effects of support systems and surrounding pressures on young athletes’ mental health
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Prior research is lacking in how young athletes’ mental health is affected by surrounding experiences and pressures. Personal pressures, parents, coaches, and expectations for success can lead to poor mental health, anxiety, and bouts with depression that may in turn go to affect an athlete outside of the sphere of play. Stigma is among the top barriers for help-seeking behaviors for individuals, despite a rise in importance in professional sports and the research field. Possible mediators for these effects include mental health counseling and mental health awareness, and understanding their impact on individuals is important to keep young athletes’ mental health good and athletic experience fun. This study focuses on 93 high school and college aged current and past athletes’ assessments of these pressures and mediators to get a better understanding of how they may positively or negatively affect performance and play. Known athlete participants were asked to complete an initial survey for analysis that contained measures for current and past athletes, all assessed pressures, mental health and anxiety, and mental health counseling and program awareness. Multiple hypotheses on the effects of different situations were posed, citing previous research noting the beneficial nature of mental health counseling and mental health awareness on athletes. Results included surprising data stating mental health counseling’s negative effect on mental health, while confirming the positive role of strong program mental health awareness on general mental health and anxiety. These results, among others, go to confirm the important nature of addressing mental health among young athletes and present future opportunities for research surrounding how young athletes’ experience can be improved.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 75

Ladd, Emma Stewart, Jason Functional Roles of CTC1 and STN1 in Genome Stability
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DNA replication and repair are fundamental processes occurring in all living organisms. These processes require a high degree of accuracy and efficiency. Numerous proteins are required to facilitate these processes, and when errors occur, organisms rely on crucial proteins to identify and correct these issues to ensure genome stability. In cases where replication fidelity is compromised and repair is not possible, serious consequences can arise, including cancer development, phenotypic dysfunction, or even organism inviability. CST (CTC1 – STN1 – TEN1) is a heterotrimeric protein complex conserved from yeast to humans and known for its roles in DNA replication and repair. While CST is predominately associated with the telomeres, it has also been implicated in the response to genome-wide damage and replication stress. Mutations in the CTC1 and STN1 subunits of CST are linked to various genetic diseases and cancers, highlighting the relevance of uncovering the functions of CST and its constituent subunits. To better understand CST function, inducible CTC1 and STN1 knockout (KO) cell lines were created. This research seeks to establish the importance of STN1 and CTC1 in protecting and maintaining genomic stability, through analysis of anaphase bridge and micronuclei formation. Both anaphase bridges and micronuclei can result from dysfunctional DNA replication and cell cycle progression and serve as indicators of general genome instability. Using inducible KO cell lines for STN1 and CTC1, we examine the effects of removing each subunit on genome stability and cell proliferation. Our findings indicate that loss of CTC1 or STN1 increased anaphase bridges and micronuclei and decreased proliferation, indicating that both CTC1 and STN1 are integral to maintaining genome stability.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 92

Marshall, Christopher
Vinson, Marianna
Pizzuti, Adam Assessing Time in Therapeutic Range (TTR): Is remote warfarin management as effective as standard in-person care?
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Background: Warfarin is a medication utilized to prevent stroke or thromboembolic events in eligible patients. This medication requires monitoring for efficacy and safety with blood tests for an international normalized ratio (INR) to be in a specific goal range. Risks of major bleeding and thromboembolism are increased during the times when patients are above or below the therapeutic range of INR. An important variable in quality assessment of warfarin anticoagulation therapy is to systematically and routinely evaluate the percent of time patients spend within the target INR range. This evaluation is referred to as time in therapeutic range (TTR). The TTR is highly dependent on multiple factors, including patient adherence and the quality of dose management, as reflected in studies. There are three main methods used to calculate TTR: traditional, cross-sectional, and Rosendaal. This project aims to provide healthcare professionals with an analysis of TTR for patients undergoing remote versus in-patient monitoring. Methods: This retrospective, observational chart review evaluated patients currently receiving warfarin at an outpatient cardiology clinic who partake in remote monitoring versus in-person clinic visit monitoring. A total of 50 patients were chosen at random from 1/1/2021-1/1/2022. Patients that had a preexisting hypercoagulable state or failed to have 8 consecutive INR values drawn were excluded. A total of 31 in-person clinic patients and 14 remotely monitored patients did not meet the inclusion criteria and were excluded. Background demographics included patient characteristics (e.g. age, race, weight), indication for warfarin, comorbid disease states, concomitant medications, liver function, and zip codes. Primary objectives are TTR calculations of the groups and secondary outcomes included hospitalizations or bleeding events. Data analysis was completed for patient TTR values and mean analysis was completed for demographic data points. TTR calculations were completed for those with INRs with goals of 2-3. Final analysis is undergoing completion.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Columbia Ballroom (CMCC upper level)
 Poster: 144

Marshall, Christopher Eberth, Jan COVID-19’s Impact on Telehealth Usage in Rural Health Clinics across the United States
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Background Inadequate healthcare access in rural health communities has been a persistent and worsening problem. Telehealth has the potential to limit these disparities and telehealth utilization significantly increased nationwide in response to the COVID-19 pandemic across different health care settings, such as Federally Qualified Health Centers, but disparities in rural areas persist. There is limited data that explores telehealth usage in Rural Health Clinics (RHCs) during the pandemic. Therefore, our objective was to describe the use of telehealth in RHCs during the COVID-19 pandemic. Methods A survey of RHCs was developed to assess the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on cancer prevention and control activities but also included broader questions, such as on the use of telehealth. A systematic, stratified random sample of 1,900 RHCs were surveyed. Data come from a preliminary assessment of survey responses of 110 RHCs collected from April 1st to July 9th, 2021. Frequencies and percentages were calculated to assess telehealth experiences in RHCs before and after March 2020 (i.e., when the pandemic began). Results Of the RHCs surveyed, 66.97% were hospital-owned, 25.69% provider-owned, and less than 1% had other ownership structures. On average, these clinics were served by 2.3 physicians, 2.3 advanced practice nurses, and 1.3 physician assistants. Before March 2020, 21.65% of RHCs reported having telehealth capabilities. There was a sizable increase Ownerin current capabilities, with 92.66% of RHCs now having telehealth capabilities. Of these clinics, 68.81% offered telehealth with video and phone capabilities, 11.93% solely offered via phone, and 9.17% offered telehealth by video only. For services offered via telehealth, 81.25% of the surveyed RHCs offered office or outpatient evaluation and management services, 17.86% offered mental health counseling, 35.77% offered preventative health screening, and

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Columbia Ballroom (CMCC upper level)
 Poster: 129

McCool, Talia Sophocleous, Maria The Many Factors of Patient Care
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As a Public Health major, I have learned the value of health education through effective forms of communication. Many people suffer from diseases or mistreatments because of a lack of education on their diagnosis and treatment plan. I started working at an Urgent Care my senior year and was able to appreciate the connection between healthcare workers and patients. Throughout college, I had the opportunity to become a teaching assistant, work at an Urgent Care, intern at the South Carolina Department of Health and Human Services and obtain a phlebotomy certification. Those opportunities allowed me to fully appreciate all the stages a patient goes through when seeking healthcare and maintaining a healthy lifestyle. These experiences have been both hands-on patient care and behind-the-scenes advocating for the patients. This has solidified my choice in pursuing a career as a Physician Assistant. Knowing how factors could prevent a patient from seeking healthcare, makes me want to strive for change with education, policies, and coverage, while still being hands-on with the patient.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 198

Divers, Elizabeth Epps, Lauren Professional and Civic Engagement: The U101 Peer Leader Experience
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In the fall of 2021, I served as a University 101 peer leader for a class of freshman business students. I acted as an approachable resource for anything they needed help with or had questions about in regards to their freshman experience. I was inspired to serve by my peer leader when I was a freshman. She provided helpful information, resources, and mostly just a friend who would listen and give advice. I wanted to give back to the University of South Carolina by being that same role model for my class. I have always been passionate about servant leadership starting in my role in student government in high school and I knew this would be a fulfilling senior year experience for me. I was focused on making a large impact on my students and in my role, but in my time as a peer leader, I realized the most rewarding part of my experience was the little moments and interactions between my students and me. From these moments, I was able to become a better listener and empathizer. My role also greatly increased my confidence in my own abilities and knowledge. The original goals I set for myself at the beginning of the semester were to be open with my students, be a reliable resource for them, have a foundation of trust and understanding with my teaching partner, and for my students to be involved in discussion and to grow and learn in some way during the semester. I believe I was able to achieve all of these in the duration of my role. While my time at the University of South Carolina is coming to an end, I will be able to take this experience and the soft skills I have developed during it and apply it to my professional career as a Human Resources Rotational Associate. I hope to continue work similar to what I was able to do inside the classroom with my students in a learning and development role.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 206

Hayes, William Wedell, Douglas Testing Models of Context-Dependent Outcome Encoding in Reinforcement Learning
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Previous studies of reinforcement-learning (RL) have established that choice outcomes are encoded in a context-dependent fashion. Several computational models have been proposed to explain context-dependent encoding, including reference point centering and range adaptation models. The former assumes that outcomes are centered around a running estimate of the average reward in each choice context, while the latter assumes that outcomes are compared to the minimum reward and then scaled by an estimate of the range of outcomes in each choice context. However, there are other computational mechanisms that can explain context dependence in RL. In the present study, a frequency encoding model is introduced that assumes outcomes are evaluated based on their proportional rank within a sample of recently experienced outcomes from the local context. A hybrid range-frequency model is also considered that combines the range adaptation and frequency encoding mechanisms. We designed a choice task for which the candidate models make divergent predictions and leveraged it in an online experiment. The results were most consistent with models that incorporate frequency or rank-based encoding. This research adds to our understanding of the underlying computational processes mediating context-dependent outcome encoding in human RL.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Pastides Alumni Center Ballroom 1b
Time: 9:50 

Foster, Rylee Morris, Caleb Growing as a Leader Through Being a Sorority Woman
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In 2019, I joined a National Panhellenic Sorority on campus, Pi Beta Phi that had over 300 other women in the chapter. During the 2021 calendar year, I decided to run as Vice President of Operations for my sorority. As Vice President of Operations, I coordinated the administrative functions for every member of the chapter. This included attendance, membership rosters, and most importantly always presenting myself as a leader both in and outside of the sorority. I wanted to run for a leadership position since I had been in multiple leadership positions in the past. The most comparable position would be my senior class president experience in high school where I lead over 800 seniors. I love being involved and serving others by utilizing the skills that I possess. During this executive position, I learned how to better work with a team of people and gained new perspectives when approaching issues. I also had to adapt since this was during the COVID pandemic and had to be creative with thinking of new ways to solve problems. I also held a great amount of responsibility that made me accountable for my actions and how I acted as a leader. Most people think that Greek Life is an organization where people pay for their friends and to party, but I was able to develop greater leadership skills, be supported academically, and make lifelong friends. Once I graduate I hope to find a job where I can use my organizational and leadership skills to best work with a team of like-minded individuals.

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 170

Hoffman, Jacob Spence, Gina Leading Carolina Productions Through COVID-19
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During the 2020 calendar year, I served as the President of Carolina Productions, UofSC’s student event programming board. I took this role after being formerly involved in the organization as a PIT Crew member and later as its Concerts Coordinator. I loved my first executive board role in Carolina Productions so much that I changed my major to Sport and Entertainment Management because of it. I applied for the President role because I wanted to change the way we operated and reshape what our events look like, as well as get more experience in my field. The first thing I did in the role was change the executive board structure to meet the programming needs of students as well as even out the workload for event coordinators. This worked out very well when COVID-19 hit, and we couldn’t program in the same capacity. Speaking of COVID-19, the pandemic changed the way we operated, and as the only one working in my role over the summer, it was my responsibility to change our event calendar to meet guidelines as well as create new events that met safety guidelines. One creation of mine that I am extremely proud of is Cocky TV+, a streaming service exclusively for on-campus students at UofSC. This service allowed us to reach students in a different way as well as keep our movies operating during the pandemic. Overall, I learned a lot in the role and saw some parallels in it to my MGMT 371, Principles of Management, class. I saw what motivated my team and utilized that to drive them to do their best. I also learned how valuable my communication skills were as I was constantly communication with people both within and outside of my organization in this role. Even though it was not the experience I had wanted going in, I have developed so much professionally throughout this role, and I am confident that my experience will help me land a job post-grad.

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 173

Smith, Lesley Malovrh, Paul The effects of explicit and implicit feedback on processing French L2 word order
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Recent research shows that corrective feedback has differential effects how L2 learners process input during instruction. While previous studies have found benefits of explicit over implicit feedback, some have found that that implicit feedback holds advantages for long-term retention. However, as most research has focused on the effects of feedback on test accuracy, little is known about the effects of feedback on learning processes in the early stages of acquisition and how they may change throughout pedagogical intervention. The present study examined the effects of explicit and implicit feedback on the processing of the French causative. Participants were from one high-beginner (n=25) and one low-intermediate (n=21) French course. Participants learned about the causative through a self-guided web-based program during which they received either implicit or explicit feedback. Processing was measured through self-paced reading tasks, which yielded multiple response times (RTs) and accuracy. Analysis will investigate the effects and interactions of feedback type on both immediate and long-term processing. Explicit feedback is expected to most benefit processing, as will be evidenced by faster overall RTs and higher accuracy in the explicit condition. Discussion of the results will focus on leaners’ processing of input in relation to type of feedback and changes to processing and accuracy over the course of instruction.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Columbia Ballroom (CMCC upper level)
 Poster: 3

Boyajieff, Emma Dudycha, Jeff
Schomaker, Rachel
Can nitrogen deficiency promote osmotrophy in Rhodomonas salina?
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Abstract Text

All organisms can be classified by their trophic strategies, the means by which they obtain organic compounds. Mixotrophy is a phenomenon where an organism can perform both autotrophy and heterotrophy, using both light and food as sources of energy. Recent research suggests that mixotrophy is more common than previously thought, and furthering our understanding of the physiology and flexibility of mixotrophy is important for developing a deeper understanding of ecosystem function. We investigated the plasticity of trophic strategies in Rhodomonas salina by attempting to trigger mixotrophy through depleting nitrogen availability, using population growth rate to detect mixotrophic function. We also performed pigment analyses to better understand how resource availability affects photosynthetic function. If R. salina were mixotrophic, we expected growth would occur in the dark with the availability of glucose. If nitrogen deficiency promoted mixotrophy, the magnitude of increased growth due to glucose would be greater when nitrogen was deficient than when it was replete. We found no evidence of mixotrophic function across treatments, suggesting that nitrogen and light limitation do not trigger osmotrophy in R. salina.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 110

Green, Mia Miller, Kati Activating Urban Spaces
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What does it mean to 'activate' an urban space? An active space is one that is accessible, engaging and exciting. It can be anything from a piano outside of a train station to a full-scale art park. It should attract people of all races and religions, provide a sense of belonging and focus heavily on community collaboration. Cities across the globe are becoming increasingly aware of ways to revamp their urban spaces in order to thrive. In summer 2021, I worked as a Marketing & PR intern for a prominent Atlanta real estate development company, Portman Holdings. At the time, Portman was interested in further engaging tenants at its new premier multi-use office space, Coda Tech Square. With this goal in mind, I created several unique events centered around the building’s strongest features. Coda Tech Square’s most distinct feature is a 17-story indoor spiral staircase - the tallest in the country. To utilize this, I created “Fishing at Coda,” where tenants used a fishing rod to try and “catch” a stuffed animal fish at the bottom of the staircase. The entire apparatus was less than $50, and it is now a weekly event for tenants. “Rooftop Yoga at Coda” and “Rooftop Movie Night” are two other events I created. Coda’s stunning rooftop includes a 360 degree view of Atlanta, but struggled at the time with accessibility and hosting events. I brought in a yoga instructor to offer free classes for tenants ($10 for the public). These classes now run more than twice a week. “Rooftop Movie Night” is a monthly event, where people around Midtown Atlanta are invited to bring blankets and enjoy a movie with a view. There is immense value in activating spaces of any size. As a graduating senior and public relations major, I aim to tie urban activation into my career working in a PR agency. Ideally, I’d like to work hands-on with real estate clientele to help promote and bring unique ideas to their spaces.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 173

Weidner, David Hancock, C. Nathan
Redd, Priscilla
Uncovering the Regulatory Regions in Miniature Inverted Repeat Transposable Elements
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Abstract Text

Identifying the mechanisms that control mobilization of DNA transposable elements is key to understanding genome evolution. Plant genomes are especially rich in Miniature Inverted Repeat Transposable Elements (MITES). These nonautonomous elements are mobilized in trans by proteins produced by their related autonomous elements. mPing, an extremely abundant and active MITE from rice, was used to establish a yeast transposition assay that measures mobilization frequency. We have identified the regulatory regions of mPing and the closely related synthetic mPong MITE by systematically mutating 20 bp segments. We hypothesized that some internal regions are involved in the interaction of the MITEs with the mobilizing proteins ORF1 and Transposase. We predicted that altering regions that promote interaction with these proteins would decrease transposition. Conversely, we predicted that changing regions that normally inhibit transposition complex formation would result in higher activity. For both MITEs, the yeast transposition assay identified multiple regions that promote and inhibit transposition. The presence of inhibiting regions supports a model in which transposable elements limit their activity to prevent host damage and detection by host regulatory mechanisms. To further verify the effect of these regulatory regions we created chimeric elements of mPing and mPong. We observed that the transposition frequencies of these elements corresponded to the combination of inhibiting and promoting sequences present. This suggests that the capacity of a specific MITE to exhibit hyperactive transposition is determined by the regulatory sequences inherited from the parent autonomous element.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 89

Taylor, Lyndsay
Price, Sara
Uline, Mark Computational Design of Strain Responsive Amphiphilic Polymer Co-Network for Localized Drug Delivery
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Abstract Text

Heart Failure is a major issue for patients post-Myocardial Infarction (MI), also known as a heart attack, in the United States due to adverse left ventricular remodeling. To lessen the effects of adverse left ventricular remodeling and heart failure post-MI, we have utilized a Fortran code for an amphiphilic polymer co-network (APCN) that can be implanted into the MI region 24-72 hours post-heart attack for localized drug delivery of the prototypic, FDA approved drug, Doxycycline (DOXY). Three different Fortran codes were written by our sponsor; one for a one-end tethered amphiphilic polymer, one for a homopolymer, and one a for a di-block amphiphilic polymer that consists of hydrophobic and hydrophilic polymers with multiple cross-linking sites. By modeling our APCN in Fortran, we can save time, money, and resources rather than creating many physical gels and testing them. We have studied the behavior of these three codes by running experiments and testing them at different pH, volume polymer fraction, salt concentration, and hydrophobicity. These tests allow us to run many experiments at the same time to evaluate how the APCN reacts and behaves under various chemical and mechanical stimuli. High concentrations of DOXY are loaded into the APCN using the partial charges of the drug and its hydrophilic chemical properties. Mechanical stress and strain of the heart post-MI will trigger the release of the DOXY in high concentration to the infarct region. Overall, the computational model of this finely tuned Fortran code for our APCN - with intentions to be implanted into the heart post-MI - is useful in studying how the gel reacts to stimuli and if it is biocompatible through multiple zero-cost experiments that predict its behavior. The final computational model of our APCN is still being studied upon, but we expect the gel to be biocompatible through realistic physiological parameter values and for the DOXY to be released by the local microscopic mechanical stress/strain signals from the infarct scar in the heart. After our ideal computational model, this research will need to be furthered by physical gel production and animal testing prior to human clinical trials.

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 95

Wheeler, Sydney Gower, Michael
Colonna, Nicholas
Development of mucoadhesive nanoparticles for delivery of all trans retinoic acid
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Abstract Text

Concussions, a mild form of traumatic brain injury (mTBI), can lead to headache disorders such as post-traumatic headache (PTH). There are currently no PTH-specific treatments on the market, but a possible therapeutic option involves targeting CGRP, a known trigger of headaches with receptors throughout the trigeminovascular system. Retinoic acid and other vitamin A derivatives like all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) repress CGRP production by binding to nuclear retinoic acid receptors and interfering with CGRP transcription. Therefore, we aim to combat PTH by delivering ATRA-loaded nanoparticles intranasally through mucus-secreting glands in the olfactory neuroepithelium to CGRP-producing cells. By developing mucoadhesive nanoparticles, the drug residence time in the nasal cavity increases, allowing for increased drug concentrations in the brain. In order to combat this inflammation, we developed ATRA PLG nanoparticle formulations using nanoprecipitation. To investigate the effects of incorporating positively-charged lipids in the nanoparticle on mucoadhesion, we developed two different lipid-polymer formulations: ATRA DOTAP:PLG and ATRA DOPC:PLG. We were successfully able to fabricate all three nanoparticle formulations and fully characterize the ATRA PLG nanoparticles. The average particle size, polydispersity index, and encapsulation efficiency of the ATRA PLG nanoparticles are 262 nm, 0.40, and 85.11%, respectively. The mucoadhesion assay has been developed and is being utilized to compare all three nanoparticle preparations. Using this baseline, we can characterize and compare the lipid nanoparticles to the PLG nanoparticles to determine the best option for intranasal delivery to combat PTH.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 106

Kurnaz, Leman TANG, Chuanbing Facial Amphiphilicity Index as a Robust Structure Feature on Antimicrobial Efficacy
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One of the major threats of the 21st century is resistance of microorganism towards the medicines, known as antimicrobial resistance (AR). The bacterial resistance is peculiarly important since most of the announced urgent threats of microorganisms are bacteria. To combat bacterial resistance, the mimics of the natural antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have been studied through the synthesis of small molecules, macromolecular and dendrimer-like systems over decades.1-3 However, those systems suffer the high entropic penalty while arranging their structure at contact with the bacteria membrane.4-5 Facial amphiphilicity is an extraordinary feature of a variety of AMPs to battle pathogenic bacteria which reduce the local and global arrangement forfeit.6-7 The quantitative analysis of facial amphiphilicity impact on antimicrobial efficacy was lacunary in the literature. This work conceptualizes Facial Amphiphilicity Index (FAI) as a numerical value to quantitatively characterize the measure of structural features in dictating antimicrobial efficacy. FAI is a non-simplified ratio of numbers of charges to rings, representing both compositions of hydrophilicity and hydrophobicity. Cationic derivatives of multicyclic compounds were evaluated as model systems for testing antimicrobial selectivity against both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. Antimicrobial efficacy was observed with systems having larger cross-sectional areas including tricyclic abietic acid and tetracyclic bile acid. While low and high FAIs respectively lead to higher and lower antimicrobial efficacy, in consideration of cytotoxicity, the optimized spot is typically suited with intermediate FAIs for each specific system. This can be well explained by the synergistic hydrophobic-hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions with bacterial cell membranes and the difference between bacterial and mammalian cell membranes.

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Columbia Ballroom (CMCC upper level)
 Poster: 75

Fowler, William Wellman, Denise My Transition into Post-Grad Employment
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This past summer, I interned with Goldman Sachs in the financial institutions group within their investment banking division. I was a summer analyst in their Chicago office, focusing on bank mergers and acquisitions. My group specialized in regional coverage of Midwest and Southern banks. After working through the various courses within the Finance Scholars cohort, I knew that I wanted to start my career in investment banking because it is a chance to learn important professional skills and knowledge extremely quickly. It also opens a wide array of exit opportunities that other post-grad employment opportunities do not. The best way to break into investment banking is to intern at a large bank after your junior year and return the following year for full-time employment, which was my motivation for my internship this past Summer. I learned various skills that will translate into a full-time career. These included communication skills and analytical skills that are imperative for a strong career in investment banking. I enjoyed the people at Goldman. However, I did not enjoy focusing on financial institutions, particularly banks. As a result, I actually pivoted for my full-time job to Lazard to join their technology investment banking team. This group focuses on software mergers and acquisitions and will be better aligned with my future career plans after I work in banking. It was important for me to make this transition because it offered more opportunities to work within a field in which I was interested. I look forward to joining their team this upcoming Summer.

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 240

Bui, Anh Tu Pou, Jay My Experience Studying in the US as a Vietnam Native
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Abstract Text

I’m an international student from Viet Nam, and I have been studying abroad for almost 7 years. At first, I was young and reluctant to the studying abroad idea because I was afraid of losing friends. I eventually decided to go to the U.S. because I was taught that I can’t help anybody unless I can afford the same thing that people really needed- for example, basic things to survive like food, water,etc. I believe I need to be the best to be able to contribute to the society. During my time in the U.S., I learned to fulfill my needs by accepting my differences. When we were young, we would follow the norm trends most of the time to avoid awkwardness, criticism, or danger. For example, there is almost always a scene in school related movies about bullying. A nerd got bullied because of his own difference. Not to the extreme in the movie, but everyone has their own needs must be satisfied in order to generate self-happiness. Even though a person won’t eat much, they will start to feel cranky eventually because of hunger. Studying abroad helps me to clearly visualize the differences between myself and American culture and force me to identify my needs and a way to satisfy it better. Afterward, it makes me feel positive and energetics. People are also drawn to the culture differences because it excites people with fresh information. In conclusion, we may not be able to see our needs if we have been in a social norm that prevent us from identifying needs. Therefore, we either need to take time to figure out ourselves to satisfy our basic needs first, or start something new like study abroad and hobbies because those force you out of comfort zone and make your needs more visible. My future goal is to guide people in protecting their assets by managing their assets to help them gain financial freedom.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 154

Rother, Yvette Flory, Kate College During COVID-19: The Pandemic’s Effect on College Adjustment in First-Year Students with and without ADHD
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The transition to college is often difficult for first-year students, and adapting to independent living, the loss of parental support, and heightened self-management demands are common challenges. Students beginning college during the COVID-19 pandemic experienced an entirely different transition to college, first-year experience, and mode of learning than is typical.1,2 Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is associated with lower college readiness3, greater difficulties in college adjustment4, and poorer adaptation to the COVID-19 pandemic5 in adults, indicating that the pandemic may have differentially impacted the transition to college for students with ADHD. This study aimed to understand how the pandemic has affected the functioning of undergraduate students and compare the adjustment to college in first-year students with and without ADHD. Two cohorts [2018-2019 (pre-pandemic) and 2020-2021 (during pandemic)] of first-year, undergraduate college students (N=3,006; Mage=18.32) were recruited from a multisite research consortium across several universities. Measures examined ADHD diagnosis and symptoms, functional impairments, and experiences transitioning to college. First-year college students reported significantly greater functional impairment in academic skills, skills of daily living, and overall impairment during the pandemic compared to pre-pandemic. These students, regardless of ADHD status, were similarly impacted by the pandemic in the domains of skills of daily living impairment and overall impairment. However, first-year college students without ADHD reported significantly more academic impairment during the pandemic (M=.55, SD=.56) than pre-pandemic (M=.35, SD=.44) while those with ADHD reported comparatively less change in academic impairment (pre-pandemic: M=.80, SD=.62; pandemic: M=.85, SD=.63). During the pandemic, compared to college students without ADHD, college students with ADHD reported greater functional impairment, more difficulty adjusting to the academic demands of college (p<0.01, d=.855), were less likely to feel valued at their institution (p<0.01, d=.766), or feel a sense of belonging at their institution (p<0.01, d=.812). Psychosocial and academic interventions to help students with ADHD transition to college are needed. Due to the greater functional impairments of first-year college students during the pandemic, future research should examine resources that reduce negative outcomes.

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Columbia Ballroom (CMCC upper level)
 Poster: 42

Galimba, Audrey Benton, Sarah Professional and Civic Engagement through the Role of a Resident Mentor
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Abstract Text

A Resident Mentor plays a key role in encouraging academic success in first-year students and creating a culture that promotes student well-being. My most significant contribution to the University of South Carolina has been through my commitment to improving the first-year experience at our University, particularly through my role in Housing as a Resident Mentor. Stepping into this role has greatly enhanced my college experience by allowing me to develop my leadership skills, enhance my creativity, and grow socially. Serving as a Resident Mentor has allowed me to lead efforts to successfully enhance first-year students’ transition into university life. My experience in this role helped me improve my critical thinking skills to solve complex problems, expand my worldviews to better interact with a diverse group of people, and bolster my communication skills in communicating clearly and professionally. My presentation will discuss insights into my development as a leader, as well as the positive impact working as a Resident Mentor has had on my college experience and my growth as an individual.

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 198

Yakes, Skyler DeWitte, Sharon Validity of Transition Analysis 3 Using Individuals of Known Ages
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Abstract Text

Age estimation of adult human skeletal remains is one of the most important techniques in forensic anthropology and bioarchaeology. The most commonly used adult skeletal age estimation techniques are less than ideal. It has been generally acknowledged since the 1980s that conventional methods are biased toward the age composition of known age reference samples. To correct for these problems, the method of transitional analysis was developed. The purpose of this study is to conduct a validity test that will evaluate the accuracy of estimating adult skeletons of known age-at-death using Transition Analysis 3. A sample of 61 adult individuals spanning all age categories from the Bass Donated Skeletal Collection at the University of Tennessee was used. All possible skeletal traits described by the Transition Analysis 3 manual were scored on each individual and those scores were entered into the Transition Analysis 3 software to estimate ages. A point-estimate age was produced, along with an age range of likely youngest age to oldest age for each individual scored. The estimated ages of all individuals in the sample were then compared to their true ages-at-death. Results show a bias towards the 60-70 year age range. Younger individuals (below the age of 50) were overestimated and the oldest of the sample (above the age of 80) were underestimated. This study will explore the inclusion and exclusion of certain skeletal traits and how they affect the age estimations.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 6

Barfield, Matthew Clanton, Jesse
Jones, Matthew
Radical cholecystectomy plus pylorus preserving Whipple in treatment of T4 gallbladder cancer
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Abstract Text

Background Gall bladder cancer is the most common malignancy of the biliary system. It often progresses silently, without presenting symptoms until late in the disease course. Additionally, gallbladder cancer is known to progress rapidly and metastasize early. Because of this, few instances of malignant gallbladder cancer are discovered prior to involvement of regional organs and lymph nodes, and surgical resection is rarely possible in advanced disease. Case report A 60-year-old female with no prior medical history presented with painless jaundice and general malaise for several weeks. Routine tests revealed significantly elevated liver enzyme levels and elevated total bilirubin. On MRI, severe intrahepatic biliary ductal dilatation was observed to the level of the biliary hilum proximal to a moderately heterogeneous mass. The findings were interpreted to be most typical of a cholangiocarcinoma. The patient was taken to the operating room for resection and the tumor appeared to be originating from the gallbladder with extension onto the common bile duct and duodenum. Due to increased concern for a primary gallbladder carcinoma, the decision was made to proceed with a hepatopancreatoduodenectomy, combining a Whipple procedure (excision of the head of the pancreas and duodenum) with resection of the extrahepatic bile ducts and liver. Final pathology revealed stage 4B (T4N2M0) gallbladder adenocarcinoma with 16/28 positive lymph nodes. During the postoperative period, the patient experienced delayed gastric emptying and biliary and pancreatic anastomotic leak that resolved with NPO, octreotide, and TPN over a period of three weeks. She was discharged home on postop day 29 tolerating regular diet. At her 10-week follow-up, she has continued to do well while improving her nutrition and exercise tolerance. Discussion Gallbladder cancer is uncommon, and only 1 out of 5 cases in the United States are diagnosed at an early stage. Surgical resection offers the best chance for long-term survival, but many patients are unable to undergo this treatment due to advanced stage disease. Although there is debate on the best treatment of advanced stage gallbladder carcinoma, a hepatopancreatoduodenectomy can be undertaken in highly selected patients with good results.

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Columbia Ballroom (CMCC upper level)
 Poster: 130

Hill, Lydia Foxworth, Sheri Intimacy is Hard
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My time at University of South Carolina is marked by the growth I had due to my psychology and counseling courses, as well as beyond the classroom leadership experiences that taught me about patience and personal connection. Mentoring with the Opportunity Scholars Program in combination with EDCE 600 Communication in Counseling was one of the most beneficial to my academic career and personal life as I was able to practice skills to foster better connection and discourse with those close to me. Coming from adversity in my childhood, my accomplishments stand for the hard work I put in to make a new future for myself. Being vulnerable and practicing active communication is struggle due to the lack of practice and space for this skill during my early development and the tendency to stay in my comfort zone. Being able to connect with others and stay present in emotions is a skill we all can benefit from learning. The Professional and Civic Engagement pathway of Graduation with Leadership Distinction helped me to organize lessons and activities of my time in my undergrad in a rewarding way. These experiences at USC where I was able to learn and grow into my true self gave me a foundation that I can draw from to be a better leader as well as a counselor. I hope to use this new growth in my future in the mental health field to help others.

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 233

Tu, Pei-En Hancock, C. Nathan
Weidner, David
Using yeast transposition assays to study transposition mechanisms
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Transposition is the ability of transposable elements to change position in the genome, a process in which they are removed from one site and inserted into a second. Understanding the mechanism of transposition is essential because most eukaryotic genomes are partially composed of transposable elements. Also, it provides a clue into how transposable elements interact with their hosts, helping us understand more about genome evolution. Transposable elements such as mPing and mPong are the deletion derivatives of Ping and Pong elements. These elements are mobilized by the ORF1 and Transposase (TPase) proteins. Expressing these proteins in yeast can induce the transposition of these elements from the ADE2 gene, allowing us to measure transposition frequency. A previous study by the Hancock lab showed that removing a repeat sequence from the N-terminal of the ORF1 protein (1 REP) resulted in higher mPing transposition rates. Our study aimsto determine whether the 1REP also produces higher mPong transposition. To achieve this, we transformed yeast containing either genomic mPing or mPong with ORF1 SC1 1REP expression plasmids as well as the normal ORF1 as a control. We will then perform transposition assays to determine whether transposition rate is different between the two ORF1 proteins. Determining if the effect is specific to mPing will help us to find out whether the presence of the repeat in ORF1 is a regulatory mechanism to prevent excessive transposition.

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 96

Manea, Amanda Ray, Swapan
Al-Sammarraie, Nadia
Targeting autophagy and telomerase to enhance induction of apoptosis in different human glioblastoma cells
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Glioblastoma is the most malignant and fatal brain tumor that originates from immature and abnormal astroglial cells. Although current treatment strategy for glioblastoma patients involves surgical resection of the tumor mass followed by chemotherapy and concomitant and adjuvant radiotherapy, the mortality rate has not yet significantly decreased and almost all patients die within 14 months after diagnosis. Activation of autophagy, which is a bulk recycling mechanism, promotes glioblastoma cells to degrade faulty intracellular components, like proteins, and damaged organelles, specifically mitochondria, to regenerate cellular building blocks. This allows cancer cells to withstand the tumor microenvironment (hypoxia and nutrient deficiency), ultimately leading to development of therapy resistance. Activation of telomerase, which maintains telomeric length and chromosomal integrity, in a subpopulation of glioblastoma cells enables them to defy differentiation and promotes cell proliferation, boosting primary tumor growth or post-therapeutic tumor recurrence. Therefore, targeting these two major cell survival mechanisms simultaneously with selective agents could be an effective and relatively safe way to counteract glioblastoma proliferation and progression. We used two human glioblastoma cell lines, T98G (telomerase positive) and U87MG (telomerase negative), in this study. Cells were allowed grow under starvation conditions (serum-free culture media) for one day to mimic in vivo nutrient deficiency. Next, cells were treated with thymoquinone (autophagy inhibitor) and fenretinide (telomerase inhibitor) alone or in a synergistic combination for two days. Enzo CYTO-ID Autophagy detection kit (Life Sciences) was used to monitor changes in prevalence of autophagy following treatments with thymoquinone and fenretinide (alone or in combination). Shandon Kwik-Diff staining kit was used to assess changes in morphological features of apoptosis after the treatments. In addition, immunofluorescent staining and Western blotting were employed to further understand the underlying molecular mechanism leading to inhibition of autophagy and induction of apoptosis in glioblastoma cells. Our results indicated that combination therapy of thymoquinone and fenretinide could most effectively reduce induction of autophagy and enhance apoptosis. In conclusion, a synergistic combination of these two selective compounds could act as a novel therapeutic option to combat different human glioblastoma cell lines.

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 101

Muhammad, Xeerak Hu, Jianjun Designing Novel and Exotic Protein Structures Using ProteinSolver and AlphaFold
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Protein structure and function are determined by a contiguous arrangement of amino acid sequences. Designing novel protein sequences from protein structures is a complex task with a large state space. Here we use a ProteinSolver, a deep graph neural network (DGNN) model, to derive novel protein sequences from protein structures. The DGNN uses a constraint satisfaction problem (CSP) approach to generate a novel and valid protein sequence. We present forty de novo proteins whose backbones were designed with high precision using ProteinSolver. Out of the forty proteins, thirty proteins are novel. Using ProteinSolver and AlphaFold in conjunction, we can trim the exploration of the large protein conformation space, thus expanding the ability to find novel and diverse de novo protein designs.

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 151

Loughran, Graysen Morris, Caleb Learning Through Hands-On Experiences
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During the Spring of 2022, I was an intern at Comprehensive Family Medicine & Aesthetics. While this internship was completed to gain hours for my Exercise Science practicum, I was able to learn a lot of valuable skills over the 300+ hours. These skills include obtaining patient histories, taking vitals, drawing blood, running laboratory tests, and learning the ins and outs of a private owned practice. This internship allowed me to gain valuable experience working with healthcare professionals, such as a family medicine doctor and an esthetician, while gaining critical hands-on experience with patients. As I completed these hours for my practicum, I also gained experiences that have been able to shape who I want to become as a healthcare professional. Throughout this internship, I have been able to be a part of and witness the impact that nurses have on patients. By working alongside the nurses of this practice I have been able to gain the insight of a nurse’s role which has enhanced my understanding of this profession. This internship has solidified my future plans of becoming a registered nurse which is why I have decided to apply to the UofSC Master’s Entry to Practice Program.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 191

Verma, Reet Klusek, Jessica
Moser, Carly
Anxiety and Sensory Responsivity Examined in Adolescents and Adults with Fragile X Syndrome through an Auditory Startle Probe
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Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is a genetic disorder that occurs from a mutation on the FMR1 gene found on the X chromosome. FXS is characterized by intellectual disability and those with FXS also present with elevated rates of anxiety, inattentiveness, hyperactivity, social avoidance, as well as sensory processing problems, including heightened reactivity to sensory stimuli or sensory hypersensitivity (Hatton et al., 2002; Sullivan et al., 2006; Schneider et al., 2001; Rais et al., 2018). It is thought that sensory hypersensitivity could contribute to anxiety and other behavioral symptoms in individuals with FXS (Rais et al., 2018; Cohen et al., 1995); however, research directly examining this relationship is scarce. The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between sensory reactivity to auditory stimuli and anxiety symptoms in those with FXS. Participants included 18 adolescent and adult males with FXS. Sensory reactivity was examined through the use of an Auditory Startle measure designed to elicit behavioral startle reactivity to auditory probe. Behavioral reactivity to this auditory startle probe was coded based on the Anx-DOS Coding Manual (Mian et al., 2015). The severity of the behavioral response was coded on a scale from ‘0’ (typical response) to ‘3’ (‘severe response’). Anxiety was measured from the Anxiety Depression and Mood Scale (ADAMS; Esbensen et al., 2003), a caregiver-report survey that screens for psychiatric disorders in those with intellectual disability. The general anxiety subscale score was used for the present study. A general linear model tested behavioral reactivity to an auditory stimulus as a predictor of anxiety symptoms in adolescents and adults with FXS. The model was not significant (F[1,16]=2.01, p=.175, R2=.11). The results may be limited by the small sample size. Data collection is ongoing, and therefore, we aim to present the study results with an increase in sample size. In future studies, inclusion of objective biological measures, such as heart rate, may provide a more direct measure of responsivity to sensory stimuli. Further research on the relationship between anxiety and sensory responsivity in this population is critical in order to properly target symptoms of FXS.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 41

Raley, Mary-Kathryn McClary, Jackie Selling Through Effective Communication: Lessons From Being an Education Artist for Stila Cosmetics
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One of the most important aspects in retail is understanding your clients. Generally speaking, you cannot build positive relationships without two way communication. I was employed as an Education Artist with Stila Cosmetics. I had been doing freelance makeup since highschool which inclined a Stila Cosmetics employee to reach out with a job offer as an Education Artist. For over a year in this role, I was responsible for representing the brand in stores like Ulta and Sephora. I would compete against other brands to sell products in stores. I identified that you must first understand the needs of customers in order to solve their problems. I have learned that it is important to build relationships with customers in a sales position. A salesperson needs to practice effective questioning to get to know the client, their needs and wants. Through rapport, consistency, and expert knowledge, a salesperson can cater to a customers specific needs and build a strong buyer/seller relationship. During my time as a freelance artist for Stila Cosmetics, the Columbia Midlands Ulta was recognized as the most improved in the Southeast region under my responsibility.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 252

Garrison, Grant
Larreur, Haley
Bailey, Pamela
Justo, Julie Ann
Reducing Unnecessary Urine Cultures in the Emergency Department to Combat Inappropriate Treatment of Asymptomatic Bacteriuria
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Purpose: Asymptomatic bacteriuria (ASB) is defined as the presence of bacteria in the urine with no symptoms or signs of infection and is commonly found in patients. Current guidelines from the Infectious Disease Society of America (IDSA) recommend the screening and treatment of ASB in patients who are pregnant or undergoing invasive urological procedures only. However, urinalysis and urine cultures are often ordered with little to no clear indication of necessity; if a bacteria is found, antibiotics are prescribed even if there is a lack of symptoms. However, antibiotic treatment for ASB has been recognized as inappropriate and contributes to the growing concerns of antimicrobial resistance. The primary aim of this Quality Improvement (QI) project is to reduce ordering of unnecessary urine cultures in asymptomatic patients in the Prisma Health Midlands ED by 25% over 3 months. While reducing urine cultures in the setting of ASB, this would also aid in reducing incidental findings of ASB on cultures and therefore inappropriate antibiotic usage. Methods: Following review of current urine culture ordering sets at Prisma Health Midlands ED, we aim to develop a new ordering set that includes a “soft stop.” This stop would require the ED provider to select a symptom(s) that the patient is currently experiencing, warranting the necessity of the urine culture. If the patient does not fit criteria (is not experiencing any symptoms, is not pregnant, and is not a urology patient), Epic will not allow the urine culture order to be sent. Prior to the creation of this new order set, we created a questionnaire to distribute to ED providers to assess their knowledge of ASB, frequency of urine culture ordering, and opinions on creating a soft stop in the urine culture order set. Results: Results are currently pending as this project will be one that continues into next year with QUEST.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Columbia Ballroom (CMCC upper level)
 Poster: 139

Crouse, Kiersten Eberth, John
Kostelnik, Colton
The Influence of Cryopreservation on Vascular Histomechanics
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Coronary artery bypass grafting is a widely performed surgical procedure that attaches a vascular graft around a blocked artery. Porcine xenografts have emerging potential in tissue engineering and adequately preserving the tissue’s native properties for long-term storage enables on-demand replacements. This study explored the effects of cryopreservation techniques and freezing times on porcine internal thoracic arteries (ITA) to best retain the tissue’s mechanical properties. Cryopreservation involves minimizing ice crystal formation through controlled freezing conditions and water exchange. Dimethyl Sulfoxide (DMSO) is a cell membrane penetrating cryoprotective agent (CPA) that removes intra-cellular water while polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) inhibits ice crystal formation. Since water is a significant contributor to the mechanical properties of tissues, and the exchange of water is crucial to effective cryopreservation, we investigated the biaxial mechanical properties of the porcine ITAs using four cryopreservation techniques and two freezing times. The tested groups include: (i) true controls using fresh tissue in Krebs-Henseleit, (ii) negative controls using tissue in Krebs-Henseleit without CPA in a slow freeze to -20ºC, (iii) experimental tissue in 5% DMSO + 1 mg/mL PVA, and (iv) experimental tissue in Krebs-Henseleit without CPA in a slow freeze to -80ºC and transferred to -196ºC. Tissues under conditions (ii) and (iii) were frozen for 1 and >6 months. The biaxial mechanical properties of the ITAs were determined via inflation-extension testing on a Bose Biodynamic device. Segments were axially stretched to the in vivo stretch ratio as well as ±10% of the ratio, dependent upon the vessel’s undeformed length. The axial force, pressure, and outer diameter were used to develop a stress-strain relationship. Results showed no statistically significant mechanical differences between varying cryopreservation techniques and freezing times. An additional group of fresh tissue samples dehydrated in a vacuum chamber then rehydrated will be mechanically tested and evaluated against the cryopreserved tissues. Ongoing work will analyze the mechanical properties of rehydrated tissues and depict the microstructure using scanning electron microscopy.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 103

George, Jacob Michalos, Alexis Applying Knowledge to Hands on Tasks
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During my Spring semester as a senior at the University of South Carolina I worked as an intern at Prisma Health Apex Athletic Performance. This facility uses cutting edge technology to enhance its client’s performance on the field or during ADL’s and to further enhance recovery. Apex Athletic Performance works with athletes looking to train for on the field activities, pro days, and combines. They also work with normal clients and athletes through physical therapy to help them improve performance as well and recover from injury. As an exercise science major at the University of South Carolina my internship experience has helped me gain direct contact and experience with the function of the body, ways to help enhance and rehabilitate the body, as well as create relationships with my clients. I am having the opportunity to research the effects of tight hips on an athlete's ability to perform explosive movements and powerful lifts. This allowed me to look into a multitude of exercises an athlete needs to perform using their hips such as running, jumping, squats, deadlifts, etc. I was able to look specifically at the general effect of it and ways to rehabilitate it and correct it. Participating in this internship has allowed me to confirm my passion for working with athletes and other clients in an effective manner to help them be successful; their success is my success. Through my experience as an intern here I hope to pursue physical therapy school and work in a setting surrounded by athletes.

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 156

Hollingsworth, Elizabeth Zvejnieks, Debera The Utilization of Healthcare Chaplains by Genetic Counselors
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Healthcare chaplains prioritize the spiritual and religious care a patient and their family may need during their healthcare experience. This study investigated the current utilization of healthcare chaplains by genetic counselors, as well as the ability, in time and skill, of the healthcare chaplains to see genetic counseling patients. Lastly, the study investigated if genetic counseling patients would accept a referral to meet with a healthcare chaplain. We hypothesized that genetic counselors are not utilizing healthcare chaplains, healthcare chaplains have the ability to see genetic counseling patients, and genetic counseling patients would consider meeting with a healthcare chaplain. This study used an original electronic questionnaire with both quantitative and qualitative items. An ancillary, original, electronic and paper/printed questionnaire was distributed to prenatal, pediatric, and cancer genetic counseling patients at Prisma Health – Midlands and The Greenwood Genetic Center. A mixture of percentages and frequencies were calculated as well as themes through a content analysis approach. Data was collected from 253 healthcare chaplains (57.1% female; 41.6% male) and 110 genetic counseling patients (37.3% cancer; 9.1% general; 12.7% pediatric; 40.9% prenatal). Only 15.45% of healthcare chaplains claimed that a genetic counselor had referred a patient to them. More than 60% of healthcare chaplains felt comfortable, very comfortable, or extremely comfortable while discussing genetic syndromes or cancer susceptibility genes with patients and over 70% felt comfortable, very comfortable, or extremely comfortable with basic genetic concepts and medical terminology. Lastly, around 45% of genetic counseling patients stated they would consider meeting with a healthcare chaplain. Healthcare chaplains feel comfortable in their knowledge and skill to meet with genetic counseling patients, but are not currently being widely used by genetic counselors as a referral. Genetic counselors should consider referring select patients who may be experiencing spiritual distress to healthcare chaplains.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Columbia Ballroom (CMCC upper level)
 Poster: 74

Waltz, Hanna Nolan, Melissa Triatomine-Ectoparasite Relationship: A Preliminary Investigation from the Southwestern United States
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Triatomines, also known as kissing bugs, are the primary vector for Trypanosoma cruzi in human populations, transmitting the parasite through feces exposure to open bite wounds. T. cruzi is the etiologic cause of Chagas disease, the chronic symptoms of which include severe cardiovascular and gastrointestinal complications, such as dilated cardiomyopathy, in up to a third of cases. Currently available therapeutics for chronic Chagas disease have been reported to have limited efficacy and undesirable side effects, and insecticide campaigns targeted against triatomines have proven to have limited long-term success. An estimated 70 million persons are currently living at risk of infection with Chagas, making prevention the optimal public health strategy. Triatomines serve as vectors for T. cruzi in much of Latin America, and may also do so in the southern United States. Recent work has identified the presence of ectoparasitic mites on triatomines collected in the Southwestern United States; yet, the impact of these ectoparasites on triatomine vector competency, fecundity, and mortality is not well understood. Key methods included triatomine collection in the Southwestern US, analysis via microscopy (112.5x), and triatomine PCR testing to determine T. cruzi status. This pilot study was conducted with the goal of profiling and describing the triatomine-mite interaction, and exploring potential relationships between triatomine vector competency and mite parasitization status. Approximately 13% of the collected triatomines had mites securely attached to their head, thorax, abdomen, and legs. More than one mite attached was a common finding among ectoparasitized triatomines. However, mite presence did not statistically influence triatomine T. cruzi status. Future investigations should further explore these relationships to better elucidate the role of mites as a potential biological control mechanism in triatomine populations.

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 40

Abiodun, Sakiru Greytak, Andrew Surface Chemistry and Thermodynamics of Colloidal Quantum Dots: Pathway toward Efficient and Stable Optoelectronics
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Colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals, also called quantum dots (QDs) have been identified as a prospective candidate for future optoelectronic devices. For example, lead halide perovskites (e.g CsPbX3) QDs have gained considerable attention in the past decade due to their application in various electronic devices such as solar cells, LEDs, scintillators, and photo/radiation detectors. Their excellent optoelectronic properties such as large absorption coefficient, high carrier mobility, wide color gamut, long electron-hole diffusion lengths, and tunable bandgap energy are largely responsible for their wide acceptability in various electronic devices. However, despite the recent developments, the problems of instability, ion migration and lead toxicity remain major obstacles toward their commercialization. For example, ion migration has been reported to cause phase separation in mixed halide perovskite which ultimately leads to instability and a decrease in photovoltaic performance. Therefore, many researchers have devoted attention to understanding the process of this ion migration and exchanges, however, to date, the processes underlying this anion exchange remain under debate and largely unclear. During this presentation, I will discuss my work on the thermodynamics of ligand exchange on the surface of halide perovskite QDs using combined NMR and isothermal titration calorimetry. This study has enabled us to regulate the surface dynamics of these QDs for improved stability and also helps us to resolve conflicts in literature reports. In addition to this, I will discuss our recent investigation of the process and mechanism of anion exchange in perovskite quantum dots through the mixing of quantum dots of different compositions and also by employing the use of different halide sources. Our fundamental understanding of the process of this anion exchange will help provide better-informed guidelines towards engineering perovskite quantum dots for different applications such as tandem cells and efficient devices for lighting and displays.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Pastides Alumni Center Ballroom 1a
Time: 9:40 

Signorelli, Julia White, Beth Lessons learned from studying in three continents- a GLD Global Learning Reflection
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I first embarked on this Global Learning journey when I was accepted to the International Business Educational Alliance (IBEA) program through the University of South Carolina. This consulting-oriented cohort allows for 40 international students to study at four different universities and engage in corporate projects at each location. Beyond studying at USC, I studied at University of Mannheim in Germany, ESSEC Business School in Singapore, and FGV in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. My research covers a key insight I developed from each location and experience. Each of my insights are linked to the cultural courses that I took at each abroad university- these titled as German Culture, Asian Cultures and Society, and Brazilian Culture. My findings greatly differ by location- as they are entirely unique from one another. In Germany, I recognized and participated in a passionate and radical young generation interested in change. Singapore showed me how the country thrives from hosting so many different cultures, religions, cuisines, and languages. Brazil displayed the power of a community, and how important it is to their lifestyle- from Brazilian nationalism to the favelas in the hills of Rio. Learning and seeing first-hand the unique characteristics of these countries allowed me to better connect and deepen my relationships with those I was interacting with. This also expands to the business setting, where I worked as a consultant working with different clients in each place. I found having a deeper understanding of culture to be incredibly important to serve a client and operate with a team of diverse backgrounds. I aim to take this one step further and implement this idea in the classroom here at USC to bring to life what I learned from my global experience in a practical sense.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 158

Lannen, Thomas Tedeschi, Dave Run Selection and Exposure Determination for the Majorana Demonstrator
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The MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR is an array of germanium detectors enriched in Ge-76 surrounded by active and passive shielding operating in the Davis Campus on the 4850 ft level of the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) to search for neutrinoless double beta decay. Neutrinoless double beta decay is a proposed radioactive decay which would show that the neutrino is “Majorana” in nature, meaning the neutrino is its own antiparticle. The isotope Ge-76 is chosen due to its relative stability and that it is theoretically possible for this isotope to decay to two beta particles and no neutrinos. Data produced by the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR is collected as runs up to 1 hour in length that are grouped together by run type and quality to form data sets for analysis. During the run selection process, an automatic run selection process examines each run against 15 quality attributes to provide a conservative ranking and create a good run list that defines the exposure available for analysis. A process to check and revise the run selection criteria was developed to capture additional periods of time for usable data. The outcome of exercise will also inform data exclusion in future experiments. The run selection criteria and new exposure estimates for the full Majorana Demonstrator Ge-76 operational period will be presented, in addition to an overview of the experiment and physics of neutrinoless double beta decay. This material is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Nuclear Physics, the Particle Astrophysics and Nuclear Physics Programs of the National Science Foundation, and the Sanford Underground Research Facility.

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Columbia Ballroom (CMCC upper level)
 Poster: 14

Gomez Rodriguez, Shantal Morris, Caleb Diet Disconnect
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As a volunteer interpreter for a free clinic in the Columbia area, primarily serving the Latino community, I noticed a cultural disconnect in dietary advice given to our diabetes patients. Most American doctors were not familiar with the nutritional information of popular Latino foods. Through dietary research from official diabetes websites, and organization of the information found, I created informational resources addressing pre-diabetic and diabetic dietary recommendations adjusted for Latin-American diets. I chose to undertake this project as I have personal experience being frustrated with my cultural differences as a Mexican in an American medical setting. While I have not measured how effective my resources will be in helping Latino diabetics with their journey, I have already noticed that many of our patients have more knowledge than before about what they should be eating. Regarding next steps, I hope to receive feedback on if my project is helping our patients treat their diabetes and develop more resources for them to continue a healthy lifestyle. I also hope to raise awareness to medical professionals so they may keep cultural differences in mind in their medical advice.

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 186

Baniewicz, Emily
Weitkamp, Abby
Kay, Jacob Evaluating Differences in Parents’ Knowledge, Attitudes, and Beliefs of Concussions
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Concussions temporarily cause functional disturbances in the brain, resulting in a variety of symptoms. Furthermore, someone’s sex, age, and concussion history can play a substantial role in concussion outcomes. Adolescent concussions are a growing public health concern. Research in youth concussions has not adequately evaluated parents’ knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs about concussions. Parental misconceptions regarding concussion management may negatively influence concussion recovery. The purpose of this study was to complete a descriptive analysis of parents’ knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs (KAB) surrounding concussions, and evaluate how they differ based on their child’s sex, age, and concussion history. An online survey was sent to parents one day before their initial and follow-up clinic visits to evaluate their KAB surrounding concussions. Using a 5-point Likert Scale, parents ranked their level of agreement and likelihood for a series of questions pulled from validated surveys. Results from the survey were analyzed using SPSS. To evaluate if the modifiers significantly affected parents’ responses, analyses were run using bifurcated data with 2x2 ANOVAs at alpha level of 0.05. If an interaction was observed between the modifiers and the response, a post-hoc T-test with Bonferroni correction was conducted. There were no significant differences among parents’ KAB of concussions when factored by sex. Parents of children with a concussion history were significantly more likely to say that they know when their child’s concussion has resolved than parents of children without a concussion history at the initial visit. Parents of older adolescents (aged 14-17) were significantly less likely than parents of younger adolescents (aged 10-13) to indicate their child would voluntarily share their daily progress and struggles with them. Patients whose parents condoned more misconceptions regarding concussions reported more concussion symptoms. The greatest differences in responses were observed at the initial observation, particularly among questions regarding steps to take during concussion recovery. Preliminary findings suggest that a child’s concussion history and age can affect parents’ KAB, but a child’s sex does not seem to have an influence. Further research should investigate additional modifiers and evaluate if parents’ KAB can modify patient outcomes.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 30

LaFrance, Emily Sophocleous, Maria Application of Theoretical Knowledge
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This semester I have had to opportunity to do an internship at a local high school for athletic training. I am interning at AC Flora high school, here I shadow and observe three athletic trainers at the school as well as assist with duties. I am partially responsible for making sure water is set up for athletes of 4 different sports, assisting with preventative taping, performing first aid, assisting with acute traumatic injuries, assisting with documentation, monitoring games and practices, directing athletes through rehabilitation techniques, as well as observing initial evaluations of injuries. As an exercise science major at the University of South Carolina and pursuing athletic training programs for graduate level education, this internship site has allowed me a hands-on approach to learning and further explanations of my prior knowledge learned in the classroom. This opportunity has not only allowed me hands-on experience in my chosen career field, but also expanded my patient care experience, bedside manner, network, and further develop my leadership skills. This internship affirmed my goal to become an athletic trainer and gave me the confidence to pursue it.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 202

McCarter, Maggie Nolan, Melissa Determinants of COVID-19 vaccinations among a state-wide year-long surveillance initiative in a conservative Southern state. 
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More than 350 million cases and 5 million deaths from COVID-19 have been recorded worldwide. With growing concern, and therefore increased public health measures for controlling the pandemic, came increased skepticism by a growing subset of the United States’ population. Vaccine hesitancy has become a leading barrier in COVID-19 control and prevention. Given the intricate nature of this important barrier, a single statistical analysis methodology fails to address all eventualities of this complex issue. This study utilized multiple distinct analytical approaches to understand vaccine motivations and population-level trends. With 14,915 surveys from a year-long, state-wide surveillance initiative, we performed three robust statistical analyses to evaluate vaccine hesitancy: principal component analysis, survival analysis, and spatial-time series analysis. The analytic goal was to utilize complementary mathematical approaches to identify overlapping themes of vaccine hesitancy and vaccine trust in a highly conservative US state. Principal component analysis showed four components correlated within the variables: vaccine mistrust and information garnered through various forms of media, and trust in both the science and safety behind the COVID-19 vaccine and the government. Spatial time series showed that overall, there was an increased tendency in vaccination rates towards the end of the study, as well as more positive vaccination perception. Finally, emerging hotspot analysis for vaccination status showed most areas had oscillating hot spots throughout the past year, indicating heterogeneity of vaccination status among the local population. The results indicate information source, and the population’s trust in the science and approval behind the vaccine research influences vaccine receipt. Findings coincide with previous research on predictors of vaccine hesitancy and receipt. This multifaceted statistical approach allowed for methodologically rigorous results that public health professionals and policy makers can directly use to improve vaccine interventions. 

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Columbia Ballroom (CMCC upper level)
 Poster: 48

Erichsen, Jennifer Woodruff, Jennifer
Grillo, Claudia
Reagan, Lawrence
Fadel, James
Hippocampal-specific insulin resistance elicits presynaptic/synaptic effects on glutamate neurotransmission
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In the brain, insulin receptor (IR) signaling plays an important role in various aspects of cognition. In contrast, a defective insulin signaling cascade, or insulin resistance, has been proposed to be a mechanistic mediator of cognitive dysfunction and has been observed in individuals with mild cognitive impairment or Alzheimer’s disease. We utilized a rodent model of insulin resistance confined to the hippocampus, the brain region implicated in learning and memory, to further examine the relationship between insulin and the neurotransmitter glutamate, as the glutamatergic system is known to play a key role in hippocampal synaptic transmission. Using this model, we previously demonstrated that hippocampal-specific insulin resistance reduces the phosphorylation and expression of certain glutamate receptors. This observation of postsynaptic glutamatergic effects led us to examine the presynaptic/synaptic effects of hippocampal-specific insulin resistance with regard to glutamate neurotransmission. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats received bilateral hippocampal injections of a control lentiviral vector (LV-Con) or one containing a selective insulin receptor antisense sequence (LV-IRAS) to induce hippocampal-specific insulin resistance. Seven months later, in vivo microdialysis was used to assess hippocampal glutamate efflux and on a separate day, these animals were intranasally administered insulin 30 minutes before euthanasia to stimulate IR signaling. The hippocampus was processed for immunoblot analysis to assess changes in central IR signaling and phosphorylation/expression of glutamate transporters. We observed that LV-IRAS injection selectively downregulated hippocampal IR expression and signaling without affecting peripheral insulin sensitivity. LV-IRAS animals also showed reduced hippocampal basal glutamate levels and a dose-dependent increase in glutamate efflux following intranasal insulin administration. Additionally, vesicular glutamate transporter 2 (vGluT2) expression, but not vGluT1, was significantly decreased in the hippocampus of LV-IRAS animals after intranasal insulin administration. There was no difference in glutamate transporter-1 (GLT-1) expression between the groups. Immunofluorescence analysis was also used to determine that LV-IRAS animals exhibited decreases in hippocampal synaptophysin. More studies are needed to fully understand the relationship between insulin, glutamatergic neurotransmission, and cognition, but these data provide insight into the presynaptic/synaptic effects of glutamate in a model of hippocampal-specific insulin resistance.

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Columbia Ballroom (CMCC upper level)
 Poster: 71

Kimsey, Allison Outten, Caryn Using Fluorescence Anisotropy to Examine DNA-Protein Interactions of an Iron-Responsive Transcriptional Repressor, Fep1, in Schizosaccharomyces pombe
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Iron is an essential metal cofactor required for redox reactions in most living organisms. In recent years, the nonpathogenic fungi Schizosaccharomyces pombe has been used to study iron regulation and uncover the molecular mechanisms for controlling intracellular iron levels. The GATA-type transcriptional repressor Fep1 is responsible for repressing iron uptake genes during times of iron abundance. Previous studies propose the binding of an iron-sulfur (Fe-S) cluster at a conserved cysteine site is what gives Fep1 its repressor activity, although the exact cofactor bound has yet to be elucidated. Literature reports a mixture of cluster types binding the protein. Here, we look to characterize these Fe-S bound by Fep1 with spectroscopic techniques, as well as determine if Fep1-DNA interactions are mediated by the presence of the Fe-S with fluorescence anisotropy. UV-visible and CD absorption spectroscopic analysis of purified overexpressed Fep1 from E. coli indicates the presence of at least one species of Fe-S; additional spectroscopic techniques are needed to further differentiate and confirm type(s). Fluorescence anisotropy assays done with holo and apo proteins indicate the presence of an Fe-S may allow for DNA interaction. These studies will provide further insight into the role Fep1 plays in iron regulation and will lay groundwork for future studies of other proteins involved in iron regulation.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Columbia Ballroom (CMCC upper level)
 Poster: 63

McKercher, Levi Strosnider, William
Stone, Joshua
Novel Biological-Chemical Approach for Removing Nutrients from Eutrophic Retention Ponds
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Maintaining water quality in stormwater retention ponds is often challenging given the constant input of nutrients that annually occur. Most remedial strategies focus on mitigating external pollutant loading and do not address internal loads already present within the waterbody. Nutrients, such as nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P), accumulate in sediment and within the water column, promoting the growth of nuisance algal blooms. These algal blooms cause a wide range of negative environmental effects such as foul odor, impaired visual aesthetic, and in extreme cases, fish kills. Therefore, our objective was to design a novel biological-chemical approach to remove nutrients from a eutrophic urban retention pond. This management technique included the use of a 37 m2 floating treatment wetland (FTW) paired with slow-release lanthanum composites placed inside an airlift pump. The FTW removed N and P from the water column through plant uptake and denitrification; lanthanum released from the slow-release composites reacted with soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP) to form an insoluble precipitate. The design was implemented at the Densmore Pond in Lincoln, Nebraska, USA in 2020 and 2021. Field sampling results showed nitrate-N and phosphate-P concentrations were reduced from 50 µg L-1 to

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Columbia Ballroom (CMCC upper level)
 Poster: 78

Gustafson, Sarah McClary, Jacqueline Time Management in Professional and Civic Engagement
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My junior year of college was the busiest I had been in my life. I was taking the most difficult classes I had ever taken, including reaction kinetics and a unit operations laboratory course, and working three part-time jobs as a teaching assistant, church pianist, and supplemental instructor. On top of that, I was balancing volunteer activities, sports practices, and research. Instead of becoming overwhelmed, I used the time management skills I had learned in school to balance everything accordingly. I ended with a semester grade average of 4.00 and successful volunteer and work experiences. I learned what healthy time management looks like from my experience and that I could handle busy schedules as long as I kept in mind the things that I had learned from my introduction to chemical engineering course, ECHE 101. In ECHE 101, we were given an assignment to write down everything we did for an entire week to see where we were devoting our time. That experience made me realize how much time I had been wasting. I had the revelation that there was no such thing as not having enough time – you choose what to spend your time on. The significance of this is obvious. It changed my entire understanding of time and I no longer allow myself to give the excuse that I do not have enough time – I make time for the things that are important to me.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 208

Hess, Lauren Spence, Gina The Importance of Leadership within a Non-Profit Organization
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I have always held myself to a high standard; working hard and staying motivated to be successful in all things I set my mind to. I cultivate personal growth and share my knowledge and understanding with those around me. As a senior Accounting and Finance student at the University of South Carolina, I reflect on my greatest contributions to the university during times when I applied these skills. Becoming the Director of Finance for the university’s Dance Marathon program, the largest student-run philanthropic organization on campus, allowed me to enhance my communication and leadership skills, and surpass fundraising goals for a nationwide non-profit organization. Dance Marathon is dedicated to raising awareness for and money to support the children treated at Prisma Health Children’s Hospital in Columbia, South Carolina. Because of my knowledge gained in the classroom, I can apply the skills learned to real-world experiences, such as applying the six active listening skills learned in a business communication course to my Board of Directors’ meetings. My leadership role reaffirms my career vision, improves my leadership skills, and shows me that the individuals I surround myself with truly have an impact on my personal and professional life. My presentation will elaborate on the insights gained from my on-campus leadership position as Director of Finance and demonstrate how my professors and peers have positively impacted me and led me on the path to success as a leader in life.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 174

Toussaint, Ebony Job Satisfaction Among Nurses and Healthcare Quality
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Purpose. To assess satisfaction with daily work responsibilities among nurses. Methods. Qualitative study using a web-based survey sent to a commercial mailing list. 435 registered nurses in ambulatory care settings responded. For the purposes of this study, we focused on a single question: “On your job, what are the top challenges you face within the work environment?” Results. Five key areas impact job satisfaction among nurses: (1) Staffing issues related to the nationwide nursing shortage, (2) leadership/ management, (3) supplies, resources, and equipment, (4) caring for patients and the patient load, and (5) the burden of completing administrative tasks. About 9 in 10 respondents were women (89%) and non-Hispanic white (89%). Almost 3 in 4 (72%) had a bachelor’s degree or greater (master’s or doctorate) level of education. The average years of experience in the field of nursing was 21 years. About 1 in 4 (26%) reported residing in a rural area. Discussion & Implications Job satisfaction is a significant predictor of employee performance and as the largest group of healthcare providers, nurses have a direct impact on the quality of healthcare. Further, job satisfaction has been associated with turnover which can be an indicator of organizational effectiveness. This study adds to the growing body of literature surrounding job dissatisfaction among nurses; this area of concern is exacerbated by the ongoing SARS-CoV-2 pandemic and the crisis-level nursing shortage nationwide. Future research should consider oversampling minoritized racial and ethnic nurses and nurses practicing in rural areas. Rural America has been increasingly burdened by the pandemic and nursing shortage. Additional insight into their job satisfaction can lead to improved patient care and increased retention of nurses.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Columbia Ballroom (CMCC upper level)
 Poster: 179

Ehemann, Lily Sophocleous, Maria Learning to LovethyEnemy
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My Discover USC presentation about my non-profit organization, LoveThyEnemy. In 2015, alongside my sister, we created LoveThyEnemy, aiming to help young adults fight the most permanent and relentless bully, our minds. Since then we have traveled to many schools, groups, and events expressing our message of self-positivity to the younger generations that self-love is a journey and to help them navigate the inevitable. LoveThyEnemy is a helpful resource for any person feeling as if they are alone in their mind. Our website is full of articles, information, and blog posts from courageous people revealing their journey towards self-love to help others know they are not alone in a mental health crisis. After losing too many people to suicide in our small town, my sister and I saw the need for a program like ours, so instead of waiting for one, we made it ourselves. It has been a great way to gather like-minded people together to spread our message of acceptance and love. Throughout my years running the website and attending events, I have learned many things about self-love myself but I also learned what the fear of being alone has done to the world. The most important thing I’ve learned through this organization is that you are never alone. This organization has shifted my entire outlook on life and how I treat myself daily, constantly finding little ways I can learn to avoid inward resentment or guilt. People do not need to read our info and immediately feel better about themselves, but rather, we try to rather find small ways people can begin to appreciate and recognize the ways we comfort ourselves throughout the day. I hope to continue this organization by posting more riveting blogs, finding more testimonies, and being a part of more events to spread our knowledge and awareness.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 183

Scheider, Emma Kubickova, Marketa Finding Myself Through Serving Others
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My sophomore year of undergrad, after feeling disconnected and unsure about my future after graduation, I decided to get involved volunteering at the Free Medical Clinic, a free local clinic that provides care to those uninsured and below the poverty line. Having had a passion for science and the medical field, I had spent the first two years of my undergrad hearing from speakers who embodied what it meant to be an advocate for their patients, providing a sense of understanding and love that resonated with me. I fell in love with this vulnerability of medicine and hoped to be able to exemplify these same attributes through my volunteering. After 250 hours and counting of volunteering as a medical assistant at this small clinic, I’ve learned how to create this safe place for individuals to share their most personal health moments. From assisting with routine blood pressure checks and management of chronic conditions, to helping with gynecologic procedures, I’ve learned a lot and have been shown the traits that make a great healthcare provider. While my experience has provided immense personal growth, my eyes were also opened to some of the deficits of healthcare and the progress that still needs to be made. I’ve seen first-hand how the environment one grows up around can predict the health outcomes they will have in the future. I’ve been shown the importance of achieving health equity and ensuring that people are not denied their basic right to health due to their social position or circumstances. Ultimately, my experience at the Free Medical Clinic expanded my perspective, helped uncover my authenticity, and prepared me to make a greater impact post-graduation from UofSC.

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 188

Hwang, Jihyeon Tang, Chuanbing Tough Antimicrobial Metallopolymer Double-Network Hydrogels
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We report the preparation of tough double-network (DN) metallopolymer hydrogels with antimicrobial properties. DN hydrogels are composed of the first network of cationic cobaltocenium polyelectrolytes with the second network of polyacrylamide. Metallopolymer-based DN hydrogels are prepared via a ring-opening metathesis polymerization (ROMP) of cobaltocenium-containing monomers followed by a free radical polymerization of acrylamide. Conjugating commercial β-lactam antibiotics into cationic metallopolymer hydrogels not only exhibit antibacterial activities with synergistic effects but also brings new insights toward developing antimicrobial biomaterials for biomedical applications.

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Columbia Ballroom (CMCC upper level)
 Poster: 58

Varsha, Kontham Kulangara
Zhong, Yin
Yang, Xiaoming
TLR-9 agonist CpG activates macrophages and modulates expression of microRNAs involved in cancer drug resistance and various signaling pathways
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TLR-9 agonist, CpG induces pro-inflammatory immune response. We studied the immune response elicited in C57Bl/6 female mice by repeated stimulation of TLR-9 through multiple doses of CpG administration. Complete blood count analysis after CpG treatment revealed peripheral pancytopenia and the spleen showed splenomegaly. Flow cytometry analyses of spleen and liver mononuclear cells disclosed macrophage activation, evidenced by substantial increase in F4/80+ cells in the treatment group compared to control. Analysis of serum by ELISA demonstrated enhanced levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, IL12/23, IL6 and TNFα in the CpG-treated group whereas no significant change was observed in the amount of anti-inflammatory cytokine, IL10. The spleen cells were further subjected to microarray analysis in order to examine the modulation of microRNA expression pattern following CpG treatment. Investigation of miRNA-mRNA relationships using the ingenuity pathway analysis (IPA) revealed differential expression of miRNAs associated with cancer drug resistance, HOTAIR and BAG signaling pathways along with microRNAs involved in immunomodulation. The major microRNAs altered with CpG treatment included mir27a, mir181, mir130a, mir487a, mir29b1, mir130a, mir3473b, mir21a, mir142 and mir144 targeting genes involved in drug resistance, apoptosis, cell cycle, angiogenesis and major histocompatibility complex-related proteins. Together, our studies demonstrate that chronic macrophage activation may lead to uncontrolled activation and proliferation of immune cells. (Supported by NIH grants P01AT003961, P20GM103641, R01AI129788, R01ES030144, R01AI160896 and R01AI123947).

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Columbia Ballroom (CMCC upper level)
 Poster: 176

Reasons, Dexter Sophocleous, Maria Importance of Authentic Community with International and Domestic Students
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I spent the summer and fall of 2021 studying in South Korea where I took a variety of classes with Korean and International students and attempted to explore a nation, culture, and language which was almost entirely new to me. Through my experience studying abroad in South Korea, I gained crucial insight on the experience of an international student that I believe should inform the way that all students at UofSC engage with one another. As an international student, I gained first-hand knowledge about the struggle of handling different educational systems and the importance of finding or creating genuine community. As a student at UofSC, I have also been able to meet and listen to many international students who have voiced similar struggles to what I experienced in Korea and are looking for the same goals of community and understanding of the world around them. A common theme that I have noticed in each shared struggle of international students is that it could be at least partially remedied by stronger community between and within international and domestic student bodies.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 238

Meyer, Courtney Yeargin, Susan YOUTH FOOTBALL CULTURE IN THE SOUTHEASTERN REGION OF THE UNITED STATES: CONCUSSION REPORTING BEHAVIOR
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PURPOSE: Most research examining youth football players and concussion reporting behavior is of quantitative design. A qualitative research design is useful when trying to provide a robust understanding of an individual’s experiences. The purpose of the current study was to examine the culture of a youth football league pertaining to concussion reporting using a qualitative research design. METHODS: Research was of a qualitative grounded theory design. Data was collected through semi-structured interviews. Participants included coaches (n = 9), parents (n= 9), and athletes (n=8) of an independent youth football league in the southeast United States. The league was chosen due to its high frequency of concussions and community passion for football. Interviews were digitally recorded, transcribed, and analyzed via content analysis design. Credibility was established by mechanisms including triangulation, member checks, and peer review. RESULTS: Three major themes emerged from the data relating to concussion reporting behavior in youth football. These themes were 1) negative perceptions of reporting, 2) social influence, and 3) concussion education. Coaches, parents, and athletes spoke about the fear of “not playing” in practices or “missing game[s]” as reasons players hide concussion symptoms. Social influences were identified by participants as barriers to reporting concussions. There was consistency across all participants related to the “pressure”, “[the fear of] losing their starting position”, and social stigma associated with reporting a concussion. Coaches, parents, and youth athletes indicated perceived deficiencies in concussion education across the league. With accounts of “they didn’t give us any [education]” and “[coaches] don’t really talk about [concussions] much” from participants. CONCLUSIONS: Our data provides additional support of the impact of social influences (i.e. coach/parent/peer behavior) on youth athletes’ attitude towards concussion reporting. Educational deficits regarding the effectiveness and dissemination of training on concussion were noted by all three participant types. Our qualitative design was helpful in understanding the common culture of a youth football community when it comes to reporting concussion with an emphasis of desire to continue playing.

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Columbia Ballroom (CMCC upper level)
 Poster: 50

Sultan, Muthanna The Protection Mediated by Endocannabinoid Anandamide Against Staphylococcus Enterotoxin B-induced Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome is Regulated Through microRNA that Trigger Pro-apoptotic Genes in Immune cells
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Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is caused by a variety of insults such as pneumonia, sepsis, trauma, and certain viral infections, including COVID-19 caused by SARS-CoV-2 virus. Currently, there are no pharmacological agents approved by the FDA to treat ARDS because of which there is high levels of mortality. Thus, there is dire need for developing new therapies against ARDS. In this study, we investigated the effect of endocannabinoid, Anandamide (AEA), on ARDS induced by Staphylococcus Enterotoxin B (SEB). To that end, C57BL/6 mice were administered with a single intranasal dose of SEB (50 g/mouse) and treated with AEA (40 mg/kg body weight) or vehicle, intraperitoneally. Our data demonstrated that AEA significantly improved the clinical parameters including the lung functions, and attenuated the cytokine storm induced by SEB. Analysis of the miRNA from mononuclear cells isolated from the lungs showed that AEA caused downregulation of miR 125b-5p and miR 16-5p which targeted and induced apoptotic genes including Caspase 3 and other Caspase family related genes that were validated by RT-qPCR. Furthermore, there was increased expression of cleaved caspase 3 in the cells from mice treated with AEA. Flowcytometric analysis also demonstrated increased presence of apoptotic cells in the lungs of mice treated with AEA. Furthermore, AEA caused decreased proliferation of T cells activated with SEB. Together, our data indicated that AEA protects against ARDS through regulation of miRNAs in SEB-activated immune cells that leads to induction of pro-apoptotic genes, thereby promoting activation-induced cell death and preventing acute inflammation in the lungs (Supported by NIH P01AT003961, P20GM103641, R01AI129788, R01 ES030144 and R01AI123947).

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Columbia Ballroom (CMCC upper level)
 Poster: 175

Conner, James Choong, Kevin Isolated small bowel ischemia in a COVID-19 positive patient masquerading as small bowel lymphoma
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The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-COV2) has resulted in global health crisis. While COVID-19 infection typically presents with respiratory symptoms, there are also a wide range of extra-pulmonary manifestations. One of the feared extrapulmonary complications is bowel ischemia which is secondary to COVID-19 related venous or arterial thromboembolic complications from a hypercoagulable state. We present a case of a 64-year-old male who, during workup of a COVID-19 infection was incidentally found to have imaging findings concerning for small bowel lymphoma. While he denied any upper gastrointestinal symptoms, he did have non-specific chronic left lower quadrant abdominal pain. A computed tomography scan of the abdomen and pelvis revealed a focal dilation and wall thickening of the distal duodenum and proximal jejunum. These findings were most consistent with a small bowel lymphoma. Due to this finding, surgical oncology and gastroenterology were consulted for evaluation. Endoscopic evaluation was performed by gastroenterology, which revealed severely erythematous, edematous, and hypertrophied mucosa with areas of ulceration, but without active bleeding. These endoscopic findings were equivocal for small bowel ischemia or small bowel lymphoma and the area was biopsied. As the patient remained asymptomatic, he was started on a diet, which he tolerated well, and was discharged home the following day. Ultimately, the endoscopic biopsies did not reveal any tumor or lymphoproliferative disorder, but did show mucosal congestion and hemorrhage consistent with small bowel ischemia. Follow-up imaging two weeks after discharge showed complete resolution of his small bowel imaging findings which supported the diagnosis of small bowel ischemia. While gastrointestinal manifestations of COVID-19 are described, isolated small bowel ischemia is rare. The asymptomatic and incidental finding of a self-limited small bowel ischemia of this patient raises the concern that the incidence of small bowel ischemia with COVID-19 infection may be higher than reported.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Columbia Ballroom (CMCC upper level)
 Poster: 96

Middour, Benjamin Voulgaris, George
Cahl, Douglas
Video Based Estimation of Surface Currents in a Tidal Inlet
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Tidal inlets are common features found along coastlines exposed to tidal variations. This is particularly the case in the SE USA. They provide connection between the open ocean, salt marshes and back bays and are a conduit for fish larvae, nutrients, and fine sediments that enter/exit salt marshes. Tidal inlets allow navigational access between inland ports, bays, and the open ocean in support of recreational and commercial fisheries. Their stability and navigational safety depend on the magnitude of the currents flowing through them. The tidal flow found in inlets can also affect coastal infrastructure through scouring around the foundation of bridges connecting coastal communities located on adjacent barrier islands. The focus of this study is to develop a method to accurately and safely measure flows in tidal inlets. Traditional methods of flow measurement require the use of boats for deployment of expensive equipment, such as Acoustic Doppler Profilers (ADCPs). However, tidal inlets are energetic environments with high flows and dynamic, mobile seabeds, making instrument deployment risky and recovery not guaranteed. Recent work has shown that oceanic surface currents can be estimated using drone aerial imagery from altitudes 20-50m above sea level. In this study, we utilize the same method using a nadir facing camera mounted on a stationary structure from a bridge. Short duration (2 minute) video imagery of the water surface is used to capture short, surface gravity waves propagating into the inlet. It is assumed that the observed speed of wave propagation is the sum of the theoretical wave speed and that of the tidal current present. Analysis of the imagery is used to identify the periods and wavenumbers of the waves present in the field of view. Surface currents are estimated from the deviation of observed wavenumber and angular frequency from the theoretical dispersion relation. In this contribution, a brief review of the principle of the method will be presented followed by data from an experiment on Breach inlet, SC over a tidal cycle, confirming the validity of the method and its potential for routine measurement of tidal inlet current velocities.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 147

Burzynski, Hannah Reagan, Lawrence Impairments of the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway in a rat model of Gulf War Illness
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Gulf War Illness (GWI) is a multi-symptom illness that continues to affect over 250,000 American Gulf War veterans. The causes of GWI remain equivocal; however, prophylactic use of the acetylcholinesterase inhibitor pyridostigmine bromide (PB), and the stress of combat have been identified as two potential causative factors. Both PB and stress alter acetylcholine (ACh), which mediates both cognition and anti-inflammatory responses. As inflammation has been proposed to contribute to the cognitive deficits and immune dysregulation in GWI, the goal of this study was to determine the long-term effects of PB and stress on the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway in the central nervous system. We used our rat model of GWI, consisting of PB treatment alone and in combination with repeated restraint stress, with in vivo microdialysis to assess cholinergic neurochemistry in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and hippocampus following a mild immune challenge (lipopolysaccharide; LPS). We then examined LPS-induced changes in inflammatory markers in PFC and hippocampal homogenates. We found that PB treatment produces a long-lasting potentiation of the cholinergic response to LPS in both the PFC and hippocampus. Interestingly, this prolonged effect of PB treatment enhancing cholinergic responses to LPS was accompanied by paradoxical increases in the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines in these brain regions. Collectively, these findings suggest that neuroinflammation resulting from dysregulation of the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway is a mechanistic mediator of the progression of the neurochemical and neurocognitive deficits in GWI.

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Columbia Ballroom (CMCC upper level)
 Poster: 72

Anthony, Alyssa Wellman, Denise Building Humility
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As president UofSC’s chapter of Habitat for Humanity, I worked with a team to plan, advertise, and raise needed funds to host a Habitat for Humanity Homeowner Dinner. The goal of this dinner was to provide an opportunity for the students who helped build the home to form relationships with the future homeowners and their families, and to provide them with a meal. As a team, we hosted a fundraiser and communicated with the Homeowner Coordinator from our Habitat affiliate to organize, plan, and fund this event. Through this experience, I found just how meaningful the work that we had been doing is to these people and their families. We were able to form relationships with people in the community of Columbia, of all different types of backgrounds and ages, through fellowship shared over a meal. For me, this was an unforgettable experience that inspired me to want to do more, help more, recruit more volunteers – truly showed me how meaningful our work was to these families. My presentation will discuss how I developed essential skills in professionalism, leadership, and effective communication. This experience benefited me by allowing me to learn humility in working with people of diverse ages and backgrounds which will remain instilled in me as I move to new communities, meeting and working with new people.

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 203

Klein, Katie Colon-Aguirre, Monica Charter School Library Services
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This is a pilot study to begin to understand what school library services are offered by K-12 charter schools. Although they represent a growing segment of the education market, charter schools are less likely than traditional public or private schools to have dedicated library staff, programming, or space. National Center for Education Statistics data shows only 60% of charter schools have a school library media center. NCES does not survey schools about specific literacy, research, or technology supports within schools that could be provided by school libraries. This study aims to collect data about existing school library services in charter schools with and without school library programs. The study begins to explore what services currently exist, informing our understanding of barriers to school library services, school library educational impacts, and best library practices for charter schools.

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Columbia Ballroom (CMCC upper level)
 Poster: 2

Anderson, Patrick Wellman, Denise Discovering an Interconnected World Through Meaningful Discussion
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For the past two and a half years, I have been a contributor to the Seeking Refuge Podcast and Advocacy Group. This organization focuses on increasing awareness of the global refugee crisis while also providing a platform for refugees and those who work with refugees to have their voices and experiences heard through interview-style podcast episodes that are posted online. My role within the organization has been to connect with interviewees, establish dates and collect research, and then conduct interviews. I have met with all the podcast guests virtually, and I have had the privilege to speak with politicians, authors, non-profit leaders, and NGO representatives. During these interviews, I have had conversations on pursuing justice in the face of human rights abuses, discovering the importance of empathy, creating a more sustainable future in the face of hardship - in addition to many other impactful topics. I have contributed to this organization and conducted interviews to not only develop my own knowledge and understanding of the refugee crisis but to also help others better understand a problem that affects governments and societies all around the world. This experience has also enhanced my professional skills in terms of communication and organization. Overall, I have learned how interconnected the world is across borders and institutions. Governments, businesses, and NGOs are all a part of a delicate ecosystem with events in one location affecting societies located thousands of miles away. Through reflection, I now see the importance of collaboration between different skillsets and objectives while also better understanding the importance of global events and the indirect impacts they may have. I plan to implement a focus on international relations and cross-specialty integration into my career as a management consultant.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 177

Harp, Hannah Foxworth, Sheri Being a Better Mentor by Becoming a Better Learner
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As a Supplemental Instructor for the Student Success Center, I have gained many experiences and skills I am able to take with me in the future. I participate with over 200 CHEM 111 students in order to promote student engagement in class. Also, I display leadership through facilitating three 50-minute sessions where typical attendance has been about 10, aiding student development. Additionally, I collaborate with a designated professor to implement weekly curriculum building for sessions. By using class lectures, and advised materials from the professor, I design a lesson using strategies to help retention of the information and invoke collaboration amongst the participants. I was recommended by my CHEM 111 professor because I received an A for the course. I applied for this role hoping to develop communication and leadership skills through planning and facilitating sessions. I have always been interested in assisting my peers in understanding difficult course concepts so a position through the Student Success Center gave me an official platform to do so. Now that I have held this position for over three semesters, I understand the importance of actively learning professional skills such as adaptability and task management, creating relationships with fellow peer leaders, and having a sense of purpose within my workplace. Being a resource for other students has been very rewarding as I frequently have students who repeatedly attend and I enjoy seeing their growth throughout the duration of the semester. Each moment where I see something finally click for a student that has been working very hard to understand is the reason why I love this peer leader role. My presentation at Discover USC will highlight how Supplemental Instruction has enhanced my experience at the University of South Carolina as well as supplemented my skills as both a learner and a mentor.

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 244

Battafarano, Chase
Janson, Christopher
Boggs, Carol ENVR 480: Appalachian Riparian Buffer Restoration for Brook Trout Habitat Project
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Native Brook Trout are an important 'indicator species' due to their sensitivity to changes in water and habitat quality of the Appalachian waterways in which they inhabit; large numbers indicate a healthy environment while an absence indicates a deteriorated habitat. Unsustainable grazing practices by farmers are responsible for the decline of crucial riparian buffers which regulate water temperature, reduce sedimentation, and provide habitat for the macroinvertebrates that serve as the base of the stream food web. We propose improved grazing practices through landowner education and financial incentives, in order to protect and restore the riparian buffers in the Appalachian Region of Virginia. The purpose of these efforts is to protect and improve the water and habitat quality using Brook Trout populations as an indicator for overall stream health. Through these efforts we hope to see regrowth, regeneration, and protection of riparian buffers throughout the region as well as contribute to the education of local farmers in order to achieve long term results. Through financial incentives and an educational approach we can convey the importance of sustainable grazing practices for habitat and hydrology of the surrounding ecosystems. Our contribution will drastically improve the quality of the waterways as well as restore the native Brook Trout population throughout the region which will have collateral benefits to all organisms who thrive in similar conditions. Central Appalachian Habitat Stewardship Program RFP https://www.nfwf.org/programs/central-appalachia-habitat-stewardship-program/central-appalachia-habitat-stewardship

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 122

Berlin, Samantha Benton, Sarah Who Are You? Finding What You Value to Communicate Your Potential
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It is essential to learn about your own identity in order to communicate your potential to prospective employers. Throughout my time at Carolina, I have spent my time focused on finding out who I am and what I value. Using what I learned in my public relations courses, I built my own personal brand. I became reflective about my own experiences so that I could best communicate their impact. During the internship search I used this knowledge to distinguish myself as the premier public relations student using the evidence of my own relevant skills and abilities. When I was awarded the intern role at Vault Communications, I was told my communication skills established my credibility as a young professional and ultimately led to my hiring. When I studied abroad in Florence, Italy, I learned even more about myself. Forming a deep appreciation for a new culture through the acculturation process allowed me to gain a deeper understanding of who I am. I learned how to communicate my emotions about adjusting to a new culture, which will be useful when adjusting to a company culture in the workplace. Communication is key in any role, but was especially useful as a U101 peer leader. In this role I learned the importance of understanding the needs and feelings of others to become an empathetic leader. Showing empathy in my communication is one of the values I hold close. Knowing what you value is necessary in order to find who you are. Our personal values have a great impact on our lives and help us to lead the life we desire. The more you know about yourself, the easier it is to communicate your potential to others. I am now much further along in my path to finding me.

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 238

McLaughlin, Graham Hollis, Brian Experimental Reinforcement Using Laboratory Island Populations of Drosophila melanogaster
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Abstract Text

Reinforcement is the process by which natural selection directly contributes to the strengthening of reproductive isolation between genetically diverged populations. Using an experimental evolution approach with the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, we mimicked the conditions needed for reinforcement by testing whether low hybrid fitness is sufficient to overcome gene flow. Experimental populations were established from two highly diverged allopatric lab populations (Fst ≈ 0.3). Four treatments were tested, each with four replicate populations and varying strengths of selection against hybridization (a control treatment with no migration, and three treatments with migration and either no selection, intermediate selection, or strong selection). Our goal was to test whether reinforcing selection can overcome gene flow, which normally acts to homogenize diverged populations, by strengthening prezygotic isolation between experimental and migrant populations. Based on theory, we predicted that reinforcing selection would strengthen sexual isolation and females would evolve greater reluctance to mate immigrant males. Similarly, we predicted gametic isolation would increase over time with female use of immigrant male sperm declining. After 25 generations of experimental evolution, females continued to show both sexual and gametic isolation from migrant males, but we found no evidence for changes in the strength of either measure of reproductive isolation. We plan to continue tracking reproductive isolation over a long timescale in our experimental populations. If reinforcing selection is insufficient to maintain or strengthen isolation, gene flow should eventually erase reproductive barriers.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 93

Arora, Ashutosh Twiss, Jeffery
Sahoo, Pabitra
ATF4 downstream Effects are Cell-Context Specific in Neurons and Glia
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Abstract Text

Neurons are a fundamental component of both the central nervous system (CNS) and the peripheral nervous system (PNS). They send signals to and receive signals from all parts of the body, allowing for both voluntary and involuntary actions. Thus, traumatic injury to a neuron or its axons can severely debilitate many body functions. Despite their importance, however, PNS axons regenerate slowly after injury, while CNS neurons do not regenerate at all. Activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4) is a stress-induced transcription factor. Axonally-synthesized ATF4 in response to Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) causing Aβ1–42 has been shown to induce neurodegeneration. Contrary to this result, work from our lab and others point to more positive functions for ATF4. We have found that ATF4 overexpression increases axonal outgrowth from dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons. However, it simultaneously triggers the death of Schwann cells. Schwann cells support axon growth, so the increased growth seen with ATF4 overexpression is even more surprising. RNA-seq and subsequent RT-ddPCR validation studies show differential regulation of gene expression by ATF4 in DRG neurons vs. Schwann cells, suggesting that the pro-growth effects in neurons and pro-death effects in Schwann cells can be controlled by ATF4-driven gene expression. Further, this shows that the transcriptional fate from ATF4 overexpression is cell context-specific. By using siRNA knockdown of candidate axon growth-promoting vs. Schwann cell death-inducing genes, we have identified 3 genes in Schwann cells and 1 gene in DRGs responsible for ATF4’s effect. Future studies will consist of overexpression of candidate genes, which are downregulated by ATF4, and assay DRG axon growth.

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 106

McLaurin, Kristen S-Equol Mitigates Motivational Deficits and Dysregulation Associated with HIV-1
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Abstract Text

HIV-1 seropositive individuals exhibit an increased neurobehavioral burden, characterized by a greater prevalence of motivational deficits (i.e., apathy) and dysregulation (i.e., addiction) relative to their seronegative counterparts; motivational alterations which are associated with profound functional consequences. The persistence of motivational alterations in HIV-1 seropositive individuals, despite treatment with combination antiretroviral therapy, necessitates the development of innovative adjunctive therapeutics. S-Equol (SE), a selective estrogen receptor beta agonist, has been implicated as a neuroprotective and/or neurorestorative therapeutic for HIV-1 associated neurocognitive disorders; its therapeutic utility for motivational alterations, however, has yet to be systematically evaluated. Thus, ovariectomized Fischer (F344/N) HIV-1 transgenic (Tg) and control rats received either an oral dose of 0.2 mg SE (Control: n=11; HIV-1 Tg: n=11) or vehicle (Control: n=10; HIV-1 Tg: n=10). Operant conditioning procedures were utilized to evaluate goal-directed and drug-seeking behaviors. First, at the genotypic level (HIV-1 Tg Vehicle vs. Control Vehicle), motivational deficits in HIV-1 Tg rats were characterized by a diminished reinforcing efficacy of, and sensitivity to, sucrose. Motivational dysregulation was evidenced by enhanced drug-seeking for cocaine in HIV-1 Tg rats relative to controls. Second, in HIV-1 Tg animals, treatment with SE (HIV-1 Tg Vehicle vs. HIV-1 Tg SE) ameliorated both motivational deficits and dysregulation. Third, following a history of cocaine self-administration, HIV-1 Tg animals treated with vehicle exhibited lower levels of dendritic branching and a shift towards a more immature dendritic spine phenotype in medium spiny neurons from the nucleus accumbens. Treatment with SE, however, led to long-term enhancements in dendritic spine morphology in HIV-1 Tg animals supporting a potential underlying basis by which SE exerts its therapeutic effects. Taken together, SE restored motivated behavior in the HIV-1 Tg rat, expanding the potential clinical utility of SE to include both neurocognitive and affective alterations. Funding was provided by: NIH Grants DA013137, HD043680, MH106392, NS100624.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Columbia Ballroom (CMCC upper level)
 Poster: 184

Beck, Meredith
Phung, Brian
Whittle, Kylie
Lamar, Scott
Nodelman, Matthew
Increasing Transitional Care Management Attendance with a Patient-Centered Discharge Planning Process
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Abstract Text

Background: In 2019 the cost of hospital readmissions in the US was estimated to be twenty-six billion dollars annually. Additionally, readmissions cause further stress on the patient physically and psychologically. Attendance of a hospital follow up appointment (Transitional Care Management, or TCM) has been shown to reduce readmission rates, improve the patient-physician relationship, and increase adherence to treatment. In primary care, strength of the patient-physician relationship has been linked to better long-term health outcomes. This project will add to current literature showing that physicians discussing discharge plans early, explaining to patients the purpose of a hospital follow up, and ensuring follow-up with the most appropriate person in a timely manner increases TCM visit attendance. The study aimed to train Family Medicine residents in a standardized discharge process that accounts for patient's readmission risk and includes them in the planning. Methods: This was a pilot study in two locations within Columbia, SC - Prisma Richland Hospital an Prisma Health Family Medicine Center (FMC). Patients were selected based on the location of their primary care physician (only at FMC Colonial Drive) and where they were going after discharge (home vs rehab). Risk of readmission risk was calculated by the HOSPITAL score and this was used to determine how soon their TCM visit needs to be. Residents were able to make this appointment themselves or by talking to the dedicated TCM nurse at FMC. Patients were provided verbal and paper education on the purpose of TCM visits as well as telling them directly when the appointment is and with which physician. Outcomes were measured as a percentage of patients who attended their TCM appointment compared to the same figure prior to intervention. Results: Pre-intervention TCM attendance rate was 66%, post intervention was 82%. Conclusion: Active patient and physician participation in scheduling and discussing the TCM visit improves attendance rate of those visits.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Columbia Ballroom (CMCC upper level)
 Poster: 112

Washburn, Caroline Bulusu, Subrahmanyam Salinity and Temperature Changes in the Agulhas Current System using NASA’s SMAP mission and CMC Data
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Abstract Text

The Agulhas Current is in a critical location to contribute to global ocean circulation and connect the Indian and Atlantic Ocean. This current has been observed to respond to events like El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and the Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD). We use sea surface salinity (SSS) from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s (NASA) Aquarius satellite and SSS from the MIT general circulation model (MIT gcm) Estimating the Circulation and Climate of the Ocean (ECCO), sea surface temperature from Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) Multi-scale Ultra-high Resolution (MUR) model, sea surface height (SSH) anomalies from Copernicus Marine Service (CMEMS), and wind from NOAA Blended Sea Winds. The time period of November 2011 to October is studied to include the 2012 Indian Ocean Dipole event. The positive IOD of 2012 is shown to affect the Agulhas current by increasing the salinity and temperature of the current because of the increase of salinity and temperature of the western Indian Ocean during a positive IOD.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 114

Rahman, Teebro Schammel, Christine Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT) in Patients Diagnosed with COVID-19
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Abstract Text

Raghavan R(1), Rahman T(1), Self S (2), Schammel CMG (3), Gray B (4), Devane AM (5) 1.University of South Carolina School of Medicine Greenville, Greenville SC 2.Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Arnold School of Public Health, University of South Carolina, Greenville SC 3.Pathology Associates, Greenville SC 4.Division of Vascular Surgery, Department of Surgery, Prisma Health Upstate, Greenville SC 5.Department of Radiology, Prisma Health Upstate, Greenville SC Abstract The COVID-19 virus has been a source of difficulty for healthcare providers due to its novel and ever-changing clinical characteristics. The literature indicates that the most common complications associated with COVID-19 morbidity and mortality are pulmonary emboli, pneumonia, and multi-organ failure. However, the question remains of the role of deep vein thromboses (DVTs) in contributing to negative outcomes in COVID-19 patients. Recent studies have discovered findings suggestive of a unique COVID-19 induced hypercoagulable state through a range of mechanisms, including an exaggerated neutrophil response and direct viral induction of thrombotic cytokines. The goal of this study is to determine the effect of DVTs in COVID-19 patients. A retrospective evaluation of DVT identification and incidence in COVID-19 patients at a single institution between 6/30/2020 and 12/31/2021 will be completed. Typical demographic and clinicopathologic data will be collected to include, but not limited to, comorbidities (heart disease, previous thrombotic events, and chronic steroid use), radiologic findings associated with pulmonary emboli (PE) and DVT (concurrent presentation, locations), treatments and outcomes. Data will be analyzed using Fisher’s t-test and ANOVA where appropriate. Data will be compared to published studies, especially those suggesting that COVID-19 pulmonary emboli occur in anatomically unique places in the pulmonary vasculature compared to hematogenous spreading PEs from DVTs. Initial findings noted that the majority of COVID-19 induced DVTs occurred within the first 4 days of the diagnosis, suggesting immediate and intense anticoagulation therapy early in COVID-19 hospital courses could minimize thrombotic complications and maximize positive outcomes for patients.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Columbia Ballroom (CMCC upper level)
 Poster: 125

Haskell, Hannah
Plankinton, Olivia
Rhodes, Morgan Can a QI initiative involving student-led patient outreach increase the number of prediabetic patients referred to the Diabetes Prevention Program?
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Abstract Text

Without intervention, patients with prediabetes (A1c in 5.7-6.4% range) can develop type 2 diabetes, which increases their risk for macrovascular and microvascular complications. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) in their Diabetes Standards of Care Guidelines recommends that all patients diagnosed with prediabetes be referred to an intensive lifestyle behavior change program such as the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP). According to the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (DHEC), participation in a DPP can reduce risk of developing diabetes by 58%. However, only 0.31 % of eligible participants were enrolled in lifestyle change programs in South Carolina from 2016-2018. Our objective was to evaluate if student-led patient outreach can lead to a 50% increase in referrals of patients with prediabetes to the DPP at the Prisma Health Family Medicine Center. For this quality improvement project, patients with prediabetes who had not previously been referred to the DPP or prescribed metformin were retrospectively identified and called by a medical or pharmacy student to discuss the benefits of the program. If the patient agreed, students would create a referral to the DPP in the electronic medical record. If the patient wished to discuss it further with the physician, the front desk personnel were contacted to have the patient scheduled. If the patient was not interested, this was documented and the physician was informed. Two attempts were made to contact each patient. After the second attempt with no contact, a letter was mailed to the patient advising them to schedule an appointment to discuss the program with their physician. Results of the project will be accessed by comparing the number of patients with prediabetes to DPP before and after the initiative.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Columbia Ballroom (CMCC upper level)
 Poster: 119

Alshamari, Saad Shapiro, Stephen The impact of pre-hosting a sport mega-event on physical activity participation: The case of the Qatar 2022 World Cup
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Abstract Text

Sport mega-events have a significant influence on the host countries in many different areas (e.g., economic, social, physical activity, nation branding). The impacts of hosting sport mega-events could be both tangible (e.g., tourist visitor numbers) and intangible (e.g., national pride), affecting the economy, education, health, sport and physical activity, urban design, and other areas of society. Governments frequently use the idea that hosting a sport mega-event will encourage the host population to engage in more physical activity to justify large investments. The majority of large-scale studies and systematic reviews have found the Olympics have a poor track record of inspiring host populations to engage in sustainably higher levels of physical activity. In contrast, there are a few studies that show physical activity can be achieved because of mega-event hosting under certain conditions. However, previous studies have focused on the post-event impact, where most of the infrastructure development and strategic initiatives aimed at improving the well-being of local residents occur between the announcement of hosting a mega-event and the event itself. To date, there have been no studies related to the pre-hosting sport mega-events, the sports programs and strategic development leading up to the event, and its impact on physical activity within the local community. Also, there are limited studies on physical activity related to hosting the FIFA World Cup. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine if pre-hosting sport mega-event influences the current informal and formal physical activity. Also, to examine if the pre-hosting sport mega-events influence informal and formal physical activity intentions. An online survey will be administered to adult Qatari residents (N= 500). Data collection will take place between March 2022 and April 2022. Standard multiple regression analysis will be used to examine the influence of the interest in the World Cup and planned engagement with the sports programs on resident physical activity behavior and future intentions. The findings of this study will advance our knowledge of mega-event impacts on physical activity by understanding pre-event impacts. This will also help host countries develop pre-mega-event infrastructure and initiatives that will maximize physical activity by local residents.

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Pastides Alumni Center Ballroom 1b
Time: 1:25 

Robinson, Alyssa James, Zack Beyond-the-Continental United States: Exploring Hawaii
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Abstract Text

For my Beyond the Classroom Experience I studied for one semester in Spring 2020 at the University of Hawaii at Manoa. I was able to participate in this experience through the National Student Exchange. My campus was in Honolulu, HI, which is on the main island of Oahu. While on exchange I lived in the university dorms. I became extremely close with two of my roommates who I still keep in touch with and have even been back to visit after the exchange. While studying at the University of Hawaii, I took courses in speech, geology, history, and journalism. My journalism classes related to my minor in advertising and public relations, learning about media history and media writing. I also had a job at a surf shop in Honolulu. This job related to my in-the-classroom experiences in my sport and entertainment management major as I gained skills in marketing, sales, and customer service. While on exchange I visited Pearl Harbor, explored beaches and took hikes in and outside of class. I also kept a vlog while on exchange which I posted weekly on my website, that also included pictures of food, sunsets, and adventures. I wanted to have this experience to test my independence and experience another part of the country during college. I also thought I could get more involved with my major as the major isn’t offered there, but was unable to. Through this experience I learned that diversity and culture are very important to me in that I’m able to interact with people who have different perspectives than myself. I also learned how to handle complete independence with public transportation, a job, and school. I am now confident I can be independent no matter where I am on the globe. Another thing I learned is that there isn’t a market for my future career aspirations everywhere, which was disappointing. I want others to learn that getting out of your comfort zone provides some of the best learning experiences. Further, I want to encourage other students to explore the National Student Exchange.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 219

Harn, Serena Karami, Amir Spatial and Temporal Analysis of Cancer Misinformation on Social Media in the United States
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Abstract Text

Misinformation has plagued the Internet since its very creation and claims the minds of users on all platforms every day. When discussing public health, it is especially common to discuss symptoms, causes, and treatments of cancer, leading many users and bots to curate false information. Because of this issue, there is a necessity to discover what in specific is being spread on the Internet about cancer and how this is impacting users of various locations over time. This research aims to shed light on this area of misinformation. This research aims to develop a framework to identify and obtain caner misinformation and social media data, analyze comments, and explore temporal and spatial trends of cancer misinformation. Through using a dataset of false statements regarding cancer, common keywords were extracted and used in a query of social media sites. Upon collecting this data from the period of July 2011 through December 2021, an analysis of the subsequential topics will allow examination of the spatial and temporal patterns of the data. We have collected and categorized cancer misinformation from different fact-check resources. We found that cancer misinformation typically surrounds causes and cures of general cancer. Further analysis of these patterns is ongoing, along with the spatial component. To facilitate further research, codes and data will be made publicly available. There is a need to develop an automated real-time framework to identify dis/misinformation, collect relevant social media, and investigate temporal and spatial factors regarding cancer issues. This project aims to do this utilizing data science methods to track activities of users and analyze dis/misinformation on social media. Appreciating this context is vital due to the lack of a systematic investigation of cancer dis/misinformation content and actors on social media.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 1

Hammond, Carly Tomlin, Kristl Comparing Patient Responses Using a Digital and Paper-based Pictorial Blood Loss Assessment Chart to Assess Menstrual Bleeding
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Abstract Text

Heavy menstrual bleeding (HMB) is one of the most common gynecological conditions that affects women leading to anemia, fatigue, emotional disturbances, and impaired awareness among other symptoms. Past diagnostic methods to quantify HMB have proved erroneous and time consuming. This study implemented a digital Pictorial Blood Loss Assessment Chart (PBAC) for women in different study populations than prior published research to record their HMB electronically. The purpose of this study was to compare the rates of return and assess acceptability of a paper based PBAC questionnaire and a digital PBAC questionnaire texted to patients. There was very low compliance seen in both arms of the clinical trial which can be attributed to limited time of patients, limited understanding of the importance of treating HMB, and a survey requiring 14 days of entries.

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Columbia Ballroom (CMCC upper level)
 Poster: 134

Provenzano, Zachary
Storo, Katharine
Cox, Samantha Socioeconomic Risk Factors for Amputation in Patients with Peripheral Vascular Disease
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Abstract Text

Background: Critical Limb Threatening Ischemia (CLTI) is a subcategory of Peripheral Arterial Disease (PAD) that includes patients with the most severe pattern of disease. One of the hallmarks of CLTI is the presence of chronic ischemic pain at rest, as well as lower extremity ulceration or gangrene. Current treatments for CLTI include endovascular interventions as well as arterial bypass surgery. Among patients with CLTI, there are a number of known risk factors that predispose patients to poor outcomes post-intervention, such as diabetes mellitus and chronic kidney disease. However, less is known about non-traditional risk factors such as socioeconomic status (SES), race, and gender. This meta-analysis will analyze and summarize the recent literature on the associations of socioeconomic factors with PAD and CLTI intervention outcomes. This study could be used to help target interventions toward groups that are at higher risk for amputation. Objective: To identify socioeconomic factors that are associated with major amputation in patients with critical limb threatening ischemia. Methods: PubMed was queried and included studies were: 1) be in English with human subjects, 2) conducted in the United States, 3) an original research article and 4) include socioeconomic factors and amputation rates in those with PAD. Variables of interest include sex, race, ethnicity, income, insurance status, location (urban v. rural, distance to hospital), education level. Exclusion criteria included conference abstracts, editorials, guidelines, narratives, commentaries, opinions, and case reports. Odds ratios were collected from studies that compare groups based on variables of interest. Results: Pooled odds ratio (with 95% CI) for each given variable were calculated using a random effects model. Measures of heterogeneity among the studies and estimates of publication bias were also calculated.

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Columbia Ballroom (CMCC upper level)
 Poster: 145

Brady, Emilie Rule, Hannah Igniting Community to Combat Hunger on the UofSC Campus
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More than 800 college campuses in the United States have food banks on campus to serve students. Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the need for such resources for college campuses have only increased, with over 50% of students using food bank services at some point. The Gamecock Pantry on UofSC’s campus is no different. For three years, I have served on the Executive Board for the Pantry; I served as the Donations Coordinator for two years before stepping into the role of Executive Director in March of 2021. As Donations Coordinator I was instrumental in expanding the inventory of the Pantry to include hygiene products, menstrual products, and freshly packaged meals. I coordinated with campus partners to ensure our shelves were never empty. As Executive Director now, I still oversee the inventory as well as every other aspect of the Pantry operations. I am working to increase our inventory and move into a bigger space on campus. I am responsible for executing one awareness week per semester to increase our support from the student body. Most importantly, I am charged with supporting Gamecocks through their hard times. From the second I stepped foot on the UofSC campus, I wanted to give back to our incredible community, and Gamecock Pantry has given me an amazing opportunity to do just that. When I started to become dedicated to the cause, I realized that fighting hunger and generally serving the community was intricately intertwined with my career path. Medicine is about serving the community just as much as running a food pantry is, and both can have an impact on individual lives as well as the community as a whole. The experiences I have had working in the Pantry have made an impression on me that has shaped the way I see our community. Often students will bring their friends in and teach them about our services, and I hope to see even more new clients walk through our doors in the future.

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 159

Williams, Sharla Spence, Gina A Place to Live, a World to Explore
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My name is Sharla Williams and I am a senior majoring in Psychology, minoring in Anthropology and Counseling. This Graduation with Leadership Distinction Portfolio uses the Global Learning Pathway to illustrate my development as an undergraduate student both in Spain and at the University of South Carolina. Over my course as an undergraduate student, I have learned that education for all is the key to improving almost every aspect within the world. There should be a constant encouragement for everyone to pursue their educational and personal endeavors. Nothing is out of reach when a person has the will power to try. Additionally, I have discovered the magnitude of importance of looking within yourself to challenge your own preconceptions. Sometimes it takes getting out of your daily environment and entering a new one with your eyes and mind open, to allow for reflection on your values and morals. Primarily, I would like to focus on my presentation on the beyond the classroom experience of studying abroad in San Sebastian, Spain. With the opportunity to spend the semester abroad, I was able to explore my preconceptions, morals, and values throughout Europe. Reflection and the determination to be more culturally aware became part of my identity. I have learned that it is important to challenge ourselves on where our thoughts originate from because prejudice and stereotypes can be detrimental and harmful to the populations that receive them. My Global Learning is meant to encourage reflection and empathy.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 222

Hashmi, Ahmar
Ramsey, Elizabeth
Mehta, Neil
Heritage, Myers
Goodman, Christopher Identifying Barriers to Early Hospital Discharges
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Abstract Text

Early and appropriate discharge from the hospital following medical stabilization should be the goal of any physician. Unnecessary delays in discharges lead to extended length of stays that translate to higher costs, to the patient and the healthcare system, and adverse clinical outcomes such as nosocomial infections. In order to understand why discharges are delayed, it is imperative to understand the interplay of factors during a hospitalization. Our efforts to understand this process incorporated the construction of a driver diagram to contextualize the hospitalization process and identify roadblocks which impede discharges. We evaluated the discharge of 59 patients and looked at the specific contributors to a delayed discharge. A Pareto chart was utilized to illustrate these factors with the hope that solutions can be directed toward overcoming the most frequent barriers. Specific outcomes that were measured included the time the primary medical team made the decision to discharge a patient and when the actual time of discharge occured. Resident physicians were polled to determine the specific needs of these patients prior to discharge and identify the factors which contributed to the lag time between the discharge order and time of discharge. A through literature review was performed to learn from other investigators who have studied this issue. Our ultimate goal will be to take these lessons and adapt them to our healthcare setting and expedite the discharge process. Several primary drivers were identified which included the primary medical team, care coordination, patient and their family members and other miscellaneous clinical factors. Several secondary drivers were identified for each primary driver: primary medical team - erroneous initial diagnosis, failure to prioritize tasks appropriately; care coordination - delay in acquiring necessary medical equipment, medications or transportation; patient and their family members- desire for further diagnostic workup, seeking a second medical opinion or expressing preference for a different disposition; miscellaneous clinical factors - delays associated with send-out labs or imaging studies, pending sub-specialist recommendations or need for parenteral antibiotics or enteral nutrition on discharge.

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Columbia Ballroom (CMCC upper level)
 Poster: 140

Posadas, Cameron Savannah McClary, Jacqueline Interrelated Mentorships Promote Academic Appreciation and Success of Peers
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Abstract Text

I have worked for University of South Carolina’s (UofSC) Student Success Center (SSC) as a Supplemental Instruction leader (SI) for 6 semesters and a Program Assistant Mentor (PAM) for 2 semesters. Ever since I toured UofSC as a senior in high school, I knew that I wanted to be an SI leader – I loved the idea of helping other students with courses I am passionate about. I submitted an application, had an in-person interview, and was fortunate to have been picked amongst all the applicants. As an SI leader, I found that I loved the job so much that I was also inspired to be a PAM, so that I could help other SI leaders maximize their potential. I only had to submit a written application for my role as a PAM, and I was again very fortunate to have been given the position. As an SI leader, I facilitate the learning of difficult concepts by providing out-of-classroom learning opportunities for biology and chemistry students. I attend students’ lectures and host three 50-minute sessions per week, as well as 2-hour exam reviews. As a PAM, I oversaw and evaluated 6 other SI leaders who support STEM courses, and I had administrative responsibilities such as attendance tracking, checking session plans, observations, and mid-semester check-ins. I have found friends who are also SI leaders or who also work in the SSC, as well as become friends with students who became regular attendees. This job, the experiences, and opportunities I have been given is more than I could have ever imagined, and for that I am grateful. Performing these interrelated roles simultaneously has fostered an appreciation for the courses the SSC supports and enhanced my passion for helping others.

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 207

Hill, Tia McClary, Jacqueline Fostering Change Across Agricultural Systems in the Americas.
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Abstract Text

In June of 2021, I had the opportunity to serve as the Digital Media and Communications Intern for Equitable Food Initiative (EFI), an agriculture nonprofit located in Washington, DC. I did this internship because agriculture workers are often overlooked and undervalued in the agriculture industry, and having the opportunity to write and bring awareness to this issue was needed. The U.S. agriculture industry has between 2 million and 2.6 million "unique hires." About 75 percent of these are foreign-born, the majority from Mexico. (U.S. Department of Labor). During this internship, I researched and highlighted how we could not only protect and restore pollinators around the world but also support and stand up for immigrant agricultural workers, such as crop workers, from horrible working conditions. Without them, our grocery store shelves would be empty. I had the opportunity to meet and interact with the immigrant workers under EFI's certified farm program and hear their personal stories of how horrible their working conditions were before they joined EFI's program and how they had poor Human Resource Management. With the information I learned from the interviews and my research, I shared with a larger audience by writing articles to highlight how we can support and improve farmworkers' lives in these horrible working conditions. I also wrote two other articles on the importance of improving access to COVID-19 vaccines and how we can help pollinators. EFI received much good feedback from my articles. By writing these articles, I was able to spread awareness and enhance EFI's mission to improve the working conditions through a variety of factors, in addition to the cultural shifts around trust, communication, and leadership on those farms.

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 229

Kiesow, Abby
Neel, Catherine
Yang, Chih-Hsiang Cross-Sectional Analysis of COVID-19 Perceived Beliefs, Gender, and Mental Health in College Students
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Abstract Text

Background: The COVID-19 pandemic has changed the way society works and has had a significant impact on the lives of young adults. With the pandemic starting recently, there has been a limited amount of research analyzing how COVID-19 has impacted college students' mental health. The first goal of this study is to examine the relationship between COVID-19 perceived beliefs and mental health outcomes. The second goal of this study is to test the gender difference in the relationship. Methods: A sample of 821 college students (Mean Age=19.9; SD=2.92) participated in this study between 2020 Oct and 2021 Nov. The majority of students (99%) were from the University of South Carolina. They completed an online survey regarding COVID-19 Health Behaviors and outcomes via Qualtrics. The survey items include demographics, COVID-19 beliefs and perceptions (i.e., perceived COVID-19 severity and impact), and mental health outcomes (i.e., stress, anxiety, depression symptoms due to COVID pandemic). Results: Our findings suggest that students who feel responsible for stopping the spread of COVID-19 have more severe mental health concerns than students who do not feel responsible for spreading COVID-19 (p

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 49

Rittershofer, Erin Pou, Jay Speaking My Mind: What being a student teacher taught me about how language impacts the classroom.
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Abstract Text

I have spent the last three semesters in elementary schools in the Lexington 4 and Lexington/Richland 5 school districts and have worked with over sixty students. While working with students, I was able to notice connections between their linguistic backgrounds to test scores and overall success in the classroom. By building personal connections with these students, I was able to focus what their specific needs were which translated into their success both in and out of the classroom. During my presentation, you will hear about how linguicism and oppression are closely related and impact students in the classroom.

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 195

Broadhead, Abigail Klusek, Jessica
Friedman, Laura
Correlation between the Broad Autism Phenotype Feature of Aloofness and Maternal Depression and Anxiety
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Abstract Text

Introduction: Autism is a highly heritable neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by challenges with social communication and repetitive behaviors. The broad autism phenotype (BAP) refers to characteristics that subtly mirror the defining features of autism; the presence of the BAP in parents reflects increased genetic vulnerability to autism. Parents of autistic children experience higher rates of mental health problems than parents of nonautistic children. While environmental factors (i.e., child symptom severity, level of social support) are related to higher instances of mental health issues, it is unclear how genetic liability to autism relates to vulnerability for mental health problems. This study explored the relationship between the BAP feature of aloofness and maternal depression and social anxiety by asking the following research question: Do mothers of autistic children who have an aloof personality have more symptoms of depression or social anxiety relative to those who do not have an aloof personality? Methods: Seventy-eight mothers of autistic children (30–65 years) completed the Modified Personality Assessment Schedule, an interview about social tendencies. Aloofness was consensus-coded and characterized as absent or present. Mothers also completed questionnaires about their depression symptoms (Beck Depression Inventory) and social anxiety (Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale). Results: Twenty-seven mothers of autistic children (34.62%) were characterized as having an aloof personality. Mothers of autistic children had higher depression scores, t(76) = 2.09, p = .040, and social anxiety scores, t(73) = 3.22, p = .002, relative to mothers of autistic children without an aloof personality. Conclusions: Our measure of aloofness is thought to reflect the BAP, which signals genetic liability for autism. It may be that those with increased genetic liability (i.e., more aloofness) are at higher risk for depression or social anxiety. Alternatively, perhaps participants with depression or social anxiety were more likely to answer questions such as, “Do you prefer to spend your free time alone or with others?” in a way that directly reflected symptoms associated these mental health issues. A greater understanding of the relationship between the BAP and mental health could inform the development of more effective supports for families who care for autistic children.

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 47

Money, Jeremy
McElveen, Mary
Twiss, Jeffery
Dalla Costa, Irene
Exploring the effects of reduced Fig4 expression on axonal transport and mitochondrial function
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Abstract Text

Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 4J (CMT4J) Syndrome is a rare neurodegenerative disease linked to a partial loss-of-function mutation in the Fig4 gene. Also known as Sac3, Fig4 encodes a lipid phosphatase responsible for regulating levels of Phosphatidylinositol(3,5)bisphosphate [PI(3,5)P2]. This serves a key role in endosomal maturation, which is responsible for many cellular functions including protein homeostasis, vesicle-based transport and degradative sorting. Despite much research surrounding Fig4 functionality and its role in endosomal maturation, little is understood about the molecular mechanisms of CMT4J disease pathogenesis. To explore this, we first conducted compartment-specific proteomic and transcriptomic analyses of embryonic cortical and adult sensory neurons after Fig4 depletion. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) of the transcriptomes and proteomes revealed a downregulation of oxidative phosphorylation and Ca2+-signaling pathways, suggesting mitochondrial dysfunction. Functional analyses of axonal mitochondria showed a sharp decline in mitochondrial membrane potential from Fig4 conditional knockout mouse and Fig4-depleted wildtype mouse neurons. This mitochondrial depolarization was further exacerbated by glycolysis inhibition. However, overall numbers of mitochondria remained unchanged. Recent work has shown that some mRNAs can be transported into axons by tethering to endosomes and lysosomes. This “hitchhiking” mechanism provides a means of transport utilizing PI(3,5)P2 as a binding site. Interestingly, RTddPCR showed a decrease in several mRNAs for nuclear-encoded mitochondrial proteins (e.g., COX4 and ATP5) in the axonal compartment of sensory neurons in culture and in vivo using axoplasm from the sciatic nerve of Fig4 deficient mice. Meanwhile, the relative levels of these transcripts in the corresponding somas showed an increasing trend without reaching significance. Taken together, these data point to a selective attenuation of axonal mitochondrial function with Fig4 deficiency that is likely caused by decreased replenishment of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial proteins from a decline in endosome-based axonal mRNA transport.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 94

Chapin, Abby DeBoom, Meredith The National Politics of Global Justice: Portrayals of the ICC in Kenyan Media
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Abstract Text

This project was designed to investigate and evaluate the relationship between the International Criminal Court and Africa. It begins by laying out the process of forming the International Criminal Court and theoretical impact that the court was designed to have. Meaning, if everything worked seamlessly, what was the expected impact that the creation of the International Criminal Court would have on the status of human rights around the world. I will then examine some of the major critiques that have arisen since its formation in July 2002 and discuss how they have played out. To do this I will be consulting communiques and press releases from various organizations involved in the discourse, but primarily focusing on the International Criminal Court itself and the African Union. I will discuss the accusations of bias that have been made against the court in so far as why they came about and how they were responded to. Fundamentally, I will be investigating the controversy that gave rise to these accusations. In later works I plan to dive deeper into the validity or invalidity of these arguments, but for the purposes of this publication, I will be focused on simply what the accusations are and why they came about. The paper then concludes by suggesting areas of further research in order to have a fuller understanding of how the Court interacts with all aspects of the African continent, whether it be the African Union, specific states on the African continent, or civilians living within those states.

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 1

Clark, Alexis Lado, Joaquin Analysis of the Influence of Patient Race and Ethnicity on Diabetes Care Delivery and Outcomes in a University Healthcare System in South Carolina
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Abstract Text

The prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) has reached epidemic proportions. In the United States, the prevalence of DM among adults is 15%, this is increased among minority groups; with 18.6% of Black or African Americans carrying the diagnosis. In addition to this increased prevalence, minority groups also have increased rates of negative outcomes when compared to their white counterparts. Previously proposed mechanisms for this disparity in outcomes include economic inequality, segregation, and disparities in access to and quality of health care. The purpose of this study was to investigate differences in care delivery and clinical outcomes based on race and ethnicity in patients with DM treated at the Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes, and Metabolism of Prisma Health Midlands and the University of South Carolina. To achieve this, a chart review was performed sampling from a period of 5 months in 2019 and 2020. 387 total patients being treated for Type 2 DM were included, with 197 Black or African American, 163 white, 5 Hispanic, and 22 “other” patients. This group was composed of 143 males and 244 females. Data points were collected to reflect general information (Age, Gender, Race, etc.), clinical outcomes (Weight and A1c change, History of Common Complications, etc.), and care delivery (Dietary and Lifestyle Changes Counseling, Monofilament Exam, Prescribed Medications, etc.). Upon analysis, we found that there were no significant differences in care delivery or outcomes between patient groups included in this study. This issue could be revisited in the future to include a larger sample size in order to further analyze disparities in DM outcomes. In addition to this, we found that many of the standards of care for DM, including lifestyle changes and dietary counseling, were ineffective in our patient population, presenting the opportunity for improvement in care practices as a whole.

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Columbia Ballroom (CMCC upper level)
 Poster: 152

Bowers, Savannah Matesic, Lydia Immunofluorescent Optimization: a framework for investigation into WWP1 regulation of ECM turnover during embryonic heart development
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Abstract Text

The extracellular matrix (ECM) is a dynamic network of fibrillar collagen and non-fibrillary components which provides scaffolding and cell signals essential to both embryonic cardiac development and to stress response with aging of the heart. Previous studies have demonstrated that the E3 ubiquitin ligase WWP1 is expressed in isolated adult cardiac fibroblasts and that it influences ECM dynamics during pathologic cardiac remodeling. However, the role of WWP1 during cardiogenesis has not been examined, mostly due to the lack of robust antibodies that recognize WWP1 in tissue sections. Recently, a novel antibody that specifically recognizes mouse WWP1 was developed. Thus, the aim of this study was to establish and optimize a protocol for its use in immunofluorescent detection of WWP1 in cardiac fibroblasts in paraffin tissue sections so that, ultimately, we could examine the expression pattern of WWP1 during cardiac development. To this end, we utilized a combination of primary antibodies including a rabbit anti-mouse WWP1 antibody and a mouse anti-human vimentin antibody (verified to detect both endothelial cells and fibroblasts in mouse tissue sections) on paraffin tissue sections of adult mouse hearts or on sagittal sections of E14.5 mouse embryos (obtained 14.5 days after copulation when the heart is a fully developed, four chambered pump). Primary antibodies were detected with AlexaFluor(AF)488- (green), AF594- (red), or Cy5 (far red)-conjugated species-specific (i.e., rabbit or mouse) secondary antibodies and visualized with a Zeiss Axio Imager A1 with a mounted camera. Antigen unmasking and antibody concentrations were optimized. When visualizing embryonic tissue samples, the fluorochrome combination of AF5944 and AF488 produced optimal, specific staining of WWP1 with clear delineation of cardiac fibroblasts. On the other hand, in adult tissue sections, the fluorochrome combination of AF594 and Cy5 produced the optimal signal-to-noise ratio, likely due to autofluorescence in the green channel from sarcomeric bands of adult cardiomyocytes. This optimization process set the groundwork for future investigation of WWP1 expression ECM turnover throughout heart development and comparison with expression of WWP1 during pathologic cardiac remodeling.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Carolina Room (CMCC lower level)
Time: 10:50-11:00am+5Q&A 

Braumuller, Kyndall Nolan, Melissa Spotted Fever Group Rickettsioses in El Salvador
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Abstract Text

Spotted Fever Group Rickettsioses (SFGR) are a group of diseases caused by tick-borne pathogens that are commonly underdiagnosed and underreported in the Central American region, and thus, are classified as neglected bacterial pathogens. The most important species in this group is the causative agent for Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever, Rickettsia rickettsii. Little SFGR research is conducted in Central American countries with higher human poverty and reduced human development—like El Salvador. Of four publications dedicated to SFGR research in this country, no pathogenic Rickettsia spp. have been reported, but risk remains high. Leveraging a current collaboration with the University of El Salvador, we collected ticks from various locations in El Salvador to determine prevalence of pathogenic Rickettsia. Ticks were collected from two agricultural farms and one veterinary practice, identified to species, and tested for pathogens. PCR amplification of the Rickettsia ompA, gltA, and ompB genes was conducted for identification of SFGR pathogens, and a separate PCR amplification of the groEL gene for presence of Ehrlichia and Anaplasma pathogens was conducted. Further confirmation of pathogen species was accomplished through DNA sequencing. Approximately 250 ticks were collected, comprising two species: Rhipicephalus sanguineus and Rhipicephalus microplus. Of the 21 collected R. sanguineus, 1 (4.8%) was positive for Ehrlichia canis and 1 was positive for R. rickettsii. Of the 211 R. microplus collected, 2 (0.9%) were positive for Anaplasma platys, 11 (5.2%) were positive for A. margina, 103 (48.8%) were positive for SFGR bacteria, and 54 (25.6%) were positive for R. rickettsii. Eleven (5.2%) of all collected ticks were simultaneously positive for two pathogens: either Ehrlichia or Anaplasma and SFGR Rickettsia spp. This is the first report of R. rickettsii in El Salvador, and only the third report of this pathogen in Central America. Given the peri-domestic and domestic nature of the animals where these ticks were collected, this is concerning for public health in a country where tick and tick-borne disease surveillance is not conducted. Our study emphasizes the need for further surveillance and research including incorporating additional human seroprevalence and testing to understand the public health burden in this country.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Pastides Alumni Center Ballroom 1a
Time: 9:45 

Glover, Mitchell Nobile, Nicholas How Fitness Helped Me Escape Poverty: The Power of Community and the External Locus of Control
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Abstract Text

Children who grow up on food stamps in a single parent home are presented with some of the poorest and least promising education outcomes throughout the country. I was one of these children, statistically about 25% more likely to drop out or fail to graduate high school. I was also bound by research to earn lower grades, pick up poor habits that would prove detrimental to my health, and go on to lead a generally unhappy life, still in poverty, just like my parents. Just 4% of children in poverty go on to earn their Bachelor’s. Systemic institutions perpetuate these American lower-class standards of poor health: lack of affordable healthcare, limited access to nutritious and satiating foods, and a reliance on working long hours just to live paycheck-to-paycheck; all of these plagued my youth and threatened to follow me during post-secondary ventures. Through a series of mentors and subsequent realizations about the control I could exhibit over my circumstances, my outlook began to change. I committed to breaking the negative feedback loop which keeps poverty in families from generation to generation, that allows father and son to die from obesity-induced cancer, 20 years apart, and that keeps the extremely expensive hobby that is being poor within the family. I graduated high school with $500 to my name, yet today I own an online fitness coaching business, have the privilege of competing multiple times a year on the national stage as a top ranked powerlifter, and I’m going to earn my bachelor’s degree. Through role models who helped me carve out a niche in the fitness community, I have developed a life for myself that I never imagined at 18 with room only to grow. I seek to empower people through my business to not let themselves become products of their environment, but instead the master of it, and break negative feedback loops which instill poor habits in us from youth.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Carolina Room (CMCC lower level)
Time: 10:05-10:15am+5Q&A 

Klein, Kathryn Klusek, Jessica Verbal Fluency and the Broad Autism Phenotype
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Abstract Text

Introduction: The broad autism phenotype (“BAP”) consists of a variety of traits found in relatives of those with autism including language and personality traits. These traits are similar to symptoms of autism but are milder in expression. Unique cognitive profiles have been documented in the parents of children with Autism Spectrum Disorder ("ASD"). In a 2016 study by Amy Camodeca and Sylvia Voelker, it was demonstrated that subjects with traits from the BAP had lower-level controlled processing skills. The presence of BAP traits is thought to reflect genetic liability to autism, meaning it is believed that individuals who have BAP traits also have some autism risk genes. We want to examine the relationship between verbal fluency and the BAP for the purpose of understanding whether difficulties with verbal fluency are related to genetic risk for autism. The purpose of this study was to examine cognitive features using FAS, a verbal fluency task, in conjunction with the BAP Questionnaire (BAP-Q) to determine if the cognitive features relate to features of the BAP. Methods: Twenty-seven mothers of children with ASD, ages 29-57, have participated in this project. These participants completed the "FAS" verbal fluency task. This task examines phonemic fluency, during which participants name words that start with letters F, A, and S. The task also examines semantic fluency, which involves naming words in a specified category. Usually both types are administered to our participants. The participants also filled out the BAP-Q, a pre-established survey that codes for BAP traits. Data coding is ongoing; additional participants will be included at the time of presentation. Results: Overall BAP scores were related to the total number of valid words produced during the FAS task (r = -.49, p = .010), but not the percent of errors (r = .37, p = .058). Follow-up analyses indicate that the aloof subscale was related to the total number of valid words (r = -.60, p

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 22

Pratt, James Webb, Clinton
Priviero, Fernanda
Polo-Like Kinase 1: Inducer of Vascular Smooth Muscle Contraction
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Abstract Text

Polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1), a serine/threonine kinase, has largely been studied for its role in cell cycle regulation. Recent literature has further implicated Plk1 activity in vascular homeostasis and smooth muscle contraction, including that of the vasculature, bronchioles, and prostate. Therefore, we sought to investigate the role of Plk1 in the contraction of resistance arteries. We hypothesize that Plk1 mediates the contraction of vascular smooth muscle through activation of the RhoA/Rhokinase pathway. Thus, a better understanding of the mechanisms associated with Plk1-induced contraction could open avenues for new therapeutic targets for the treatment of hypertension. Our data showed that Plk1 is expressed in the resistance arteries, and administration of Volasertib, a Plk1 inhibitor, produced a significant decrease in the Angiotensin II-induced contraction of the pudendal and resistance mesenteric arteries. It is important to highlight that Plk1 inhibitors are currently in clinical trials as chemotherapeutic agents, and interestingly, most of the current anticancer therapies are known to cause damage to the vasculature, leading to complications such as hypertension and thrombosis. Hence, decreasing contraction of the vascular smooth muscle by inhibiting Plk1 might be beneficial as a treatment for hypertension or to prevent the development of hypertension in the oncologic patient undergoing chemotherapy.

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Columbia Ballroom (CMCC upper level)
 Poster: 90

Carr, Soph Thompson, Ben
Simon, Nimmy
Dying is Really Complicated
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Abstract Text

Palliative Care (PC) carries a strong stigma amongst healthcare providers and patients. Misconceptions about the role of PC heavily influence the way providers communicate with patients about their care options and in many cases whether the PC team is consulted at all. The lack of conversation about PC contributes to confusion and underutilization of an essential resource to help with symptom management and ensuring the patient’s wishes are prioritized when developing the care plan. In addition, medical education curriculums do not often include strong training in the principles of hospice and palliative care medicine. We aim to use a combination of social media and current literature to bring to light the misconceptions surrounding hospice and palliative care medicine and explore ways that early training in this field contributes to better patient care.

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Columbia Ballroom (CMCC upper level)
 Poster: 119

Jones, Summar Banerjee, Meeta Attention Deficit Hyperactivity disorder in college students subpopulation Latinx groups
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Abstract Text

This project identifies protective factors within the relationship of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and academic outcomes in Latinx college students. Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is characterized as a developmental disorder that displays symptoms of poor concentration, hyperactivity and impulsivity (APA, 2017). There is a serious concern regarding the lack of accessibility of mental health services for Latinos, especially college students. Individuals with ADHD can have issues relating to productivity, high frustration, and aggression issues, thus making it necessary for treatment plans and accessibility to mental health services an important factor when dealing with ethnic minorities with ADHD.  The need for more research is of the utmost importance to explore the cultural relationship of protective mechanisms in Hispanic serving institutions. This study will explore if there are culturally related protective mechanisms present for Latinx students attending a Hispanic Serving Institution on their academic outcomes.   Recruitment for this study was completed through the Human Subjects Pool at a Hispanic Serving Institution (HSI). Data is based on a larger study known as the College Experiences Study. 863 college students were surveyed, over half identified as Latinx. The questionnaires on measures of ADHD and academic efficacy for this study are adapted from longitudinal studies on academic achievement and motivation (Eccles, 1985). Additionally, the Multidimensional Inventory on Black Identity (MIBI; Sellers et al., 1998) was adapted from this study for Latinx samples. Outcome measures are related to student academic achievement (e.g., self-reported GPA, academic engagement, and self-reported academic efficacy). Results from SPPS software showcase that there is a negative relation between public regard (-.134), self-concept (-.114), and academic engagement (-.096) when paired with the total ADHD in our study. Academic intrinsic motivation (-.137) and non-academic intrinsic motivation (-.016) show a negative relation between ADHD. Additionally, we found that there are no gender differences when compared to the total ADHD. Research findings help to ensure optimal health and quality of life for college individuals with ADHD, especially for ethnic minorities. A full analysis will be conducted on the hypothesis to address our findings and will be presented on UofSC discovery day.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 74

Kase, Bezawit Eyob Steck, Susan
Liese, Angela
Zhang, Jiajia
Murphy, E. Angela
Zhao, Longgang
The Development and Evaluation of a Literature-based Dietary Index for Gut Microbiota
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Abstract Text

Objectives: To develop and evaluate a novel dietary index for gut microbiota (DI-GM) that captures dietary composition related to gut microbiota profiles. Methods: A literature review of longitudinal studies on the effect of diet on gut microbiota in adult populations was conducted, extracting those dietary components with evidence of beneficial or harmful effects on gut microbiota. Using 24-hour dietary recall data collected on two separate days from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES, 2005-2010, n=3,821), DI-GM scores were computed and associations with biomarkers of gut microbiota diversity (urinary enterodiol and enterolactone) were examined using linear regression. Analyses were adjusted for potential confounding effect of sociodemographic and lifestyle factors. Lastly, congruence of the DI-GM with pre-existing dietary indices (Healthy Eating Index (HEI-2015) and Mediterranean Diet Score (MDS)) were examined. Results: From a review of 121 articles, 14 foods were identified as components of the DI-GM, including fermented dairy, chickpeas, soybean, whole grains, fiber, cranberries, avocados, broccoli, coffee, and green tea (beneficial components) and red meat, processed meat, refined grains, and high fat diet (≥40% of energy from fat) (harmful components). Each component was scored 0 or 1 based on sex-specific median intakes and scores were summed to develop the DI-GM score. In NHANES, DI-GM scores ranged from 0-13 because intake of green tea was not reported, and the mean DI-GM was 4.8 (SD=0.04). Positive associations between DI-GM and urinary enterodiol (β=0.123, 95%CI: 0.079, 0.166) and enterolactone (β=0.138, 95%CI: 0.091, 0.184) were observed in multivariable-adjusted models. The DI-GM showed moderate positive correlation with HEI-2015 (r=0.537, p<0.001) and MDS (r=0.423, p<0.001). Conclusion: A novel DI-GM was developed based on published literature to score the quality of diet in terms of maintaining healthy gut microbiota. The DI-GM was significantly associated with markers of gut microbiota diversity in NHANES, signifying the potential utility of this index for gut-health related studies. Funding Sources: None. Keywords: Diet, Dietary index, Gut microbiota, NHANES

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Columbia Ballroom (CMCC upper level)
 Poster: 40

Frederiksen, Adam Ducate, Lara Digital Business Transformation at Work
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Abstract Text

Last summer, I worked as a software engineering intern at Publicis Sapient. The company is an American subsidiary of the French marketing giant Publicis. Publicis Sapient specializes in Digital Business Transformation (DBT), consulting with large firms like McDonald's to work on digital marketing and user applications. The company works in specialty areas such as strategy and consulting, customer experience, technology and engineering, data and artificial intelligence, and product management. Being a subsidiary of a larger company means that multiple agencies within the organization can work on different aspects of a project such as advertising. As a Computer Science and Political Science major at the University of South Carolina, I was able to get experience in my studies by getting involved with software development and client projects. I worked on a prototype project which demonstrated the ability to place a grocery order for pickup, reviews, and tipping. The project involved various development techniques and technologies that I had not worked with before. I worked especially with the store and grocery picker aspect, allowing employees to manage the orders and to update the customer on its status. I also was a team captain of a Corporate Social Responsibility project about being environmentally friendly, I led the website development aspect of the project. This experience has motivated me to become a better software engineer and I have accepted an offer to work full-time with this company after I graduate in May.

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 217

Gregg, Alexander Reynolds, Jennifer English-Spanish Interpreter Mediated Interactions and Translations in a Medical Setting
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Abstract Text

With an increasing number of Spanish speakers in the United States, the need for linguistically accessible services is more important than ever. Specifically, in hospitals where accurate understanding could be the difference between proper and improper care, this need is even more vital. Therefore, this project conducts research in a local medical office and hospital system in order to determine how our local medical facilities, including hospital systems, physicians, and medical staff, are working to bring more attention to language services which include accessibility of certified interpreters, forms in multiple languages, and office signage, for our increasing Spanish speaking population. Additionally, this project identifies areas in which improvement may be made for the betterment of both physician/medical staff and Spanish speaking patient experiences and relations within the medical setting. The project utilizes qualitative research methodologies to collect and analyze the local “language ecology” of a doctor’s office. Specifically, involving participant observation of all written and oral expressions of language in the office, online, as well as 10 separate interviews, 5 with medical staff/physicians, and 5 with Spanish speaking patients in order to create an inventory of different experiences and ideas. Using this information, the strengths, and shortcomings of the current ways our local hospitals attempt to make interactions between doctors/staff and Spanish speaking patients more accessible can be identified. The end results would identify ways to improve the current system and make the experience as positive and uncomplicated as possible for all parties involved.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 13

Sahu, Pradeep Silfies, Sheri Validity of a Novel Device for Clinically Measuring Knee Extensor Muscle Strength
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Abstract Text

Background: Assessment of the strength of quadriceps muscle plays an important role in evaluating return to sport and rehabilitation progression following musculoskeletal injury. The current gold standard for the assessment of quadriceps strength is an Isokinetic Dynamometer (IKD), but the expense and space requirement make this equipment less available. A handheld dynamometer (HHD) is a portable device commonly used by clinicians to measure muscle strength. However, this method of measuring strength of large muscle groups is less reliable and accurate. A Novel Device (ND) was developed that locks the weight stack of any weight machine in place and measures forces applied to the machine, turning equipment currently owned by most clinics into an isometric dynamometer. Purpose: Determine the concurrent validity of a ND for measuring knee extensor muscle strength against the IKD (gold standard) and HHD in subjects with knee osteoarthritis (OA) and healthy individuals. Methods: 29 healthy (no lower extremity injury or OA) and 16 knee OA (age: 32.20±11.75) volunteers completed isometric strength testing measurements on 3 devices (ND, HHD, IKD) on a single day. The ND and HHD orders were randomized whereas the strength measurements by IKD were performed at the end for all subjects. Data Analysis and Results: One-way ANOVA was used to compare the maximum force (Fmax; N) with differences found across the 3 devices (p<0.001). Pairwise comparisons demonstrated differences in force values between ND and HHD (70.2N; p<.001), and HHD and IKD (76.8N; p<.001), but not ND and IKD (6.6N; p=.71). Pearson correlation of the Fmax demonstrated the highest correlation between ND and IKD (r=.79). Time-force curves representing force generation patterns for each subject were compared between all three devices with the average correlation for ND vs. HHD (0.83±0.18), ND vs. IKD (0.96±0.05) and HHD vs. IKD (0.82±0.19). Discussion and Conclusion: The Fmax and time-force curves measured by the ND demonstrated concurrent validity with the gold standard (IKD) suggesting that the ND is a valid device for measuring strength of quadriceps. The portability and safety of this device make it a potential strength assessment tool with utility in physical therapy and fitness settings.

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Columbia Ballroom (CMCC upper level)
 Poster: 24

Mayo, Hannah Ramstad, Kristina Small UAVs can be used to estimate hatching success in the American wood stork
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Abstract Text

Recent studies have shown that small unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV, drones) can be used as a conservation tool for diverse species. Many studies have been conducted on avian nesting and behavior. However, research on using a drone to estimate hatching success (the number of chicks hatched/number of eggs) is lacking. This study asks if hatching success of the threatened American wood stork (Myceteria americana, WOST) could be assessed using a DJI Mavic pro. Our study took place at a waterbird nesting colony in Chew Mill Pond, GA where we drone surveyed 47 nests over two years. We found little to no behavioral responses from adult WOST or chicks. Exposure to the drone did not reduce chick survival or nest productivity relative to control nests (surveyed with binoculars). We were able to estimate clutch size and hatching success in 78.3% of nests surveyed. The presence of a persistently incubating female precluded estimates of clutch size in 21.7% of nests. This study shows that drones can be used to assess hatching success of WOST with proper training and conditions.

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 125

Scharf, Matthew Federico, Alexis
Platt, Emma
Bradshaw, Jessica
Variations in Object Banging in Infants at Low and Elevated Likelihood for Autism Spectrum Disorder and Its Connections to Motor Development
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Abstract Text

Infants display a variety of play behaviors with objects over their first year of life (Fenson et al., 1976). Current studies suggest that banging of objects appears before other actions that require relational and symbolic understanding of objects. However, as children age and play, behaviors become more complex, and banging decreases (Fenson et al., 1976). Parents of infants later diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) reported observing more repetitive motor movements (I.e., banging) than typically developing infants (Werner et al., 2005). A study that observed infant motor delays within the first year of life and problem-solving skills found a correlation between the severity of motor delays and the development of more complex exploratory behaviors with objects. Within the study, banging of objects was categorized within a broader term of simple exploration of objects while problem-solving (Molinini et al., 2021). The opportunities for infants with delayed motor development to engage with and learn about the environment in new and diverse ways may be limited (Iverson et al., 2007), thus possibly explaining the repetitive application of indiscriminate motor schemes like banging. Although motor development is widely studied, its relation to banging is typically generalized to other emerging play behaviors such as simple exploration of objects in problem-solving. The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationship between object banging and motor development within the first year of life, as well as to further observe correlations between ASD and early object banging. We hypothesize that decreases in the duration of object banging between 6- and 12-months will correlate with higher raw gross and fine motor scores and that infants with siblings who have been diagnosed with ASD will exhibit higher proportions of object banging than their typically developing counterparts. Results of this study will provide insight into the relationship between object banging during play and motor development within the first year of life as well as connections to ASD thus informing future investigation of banging as an early stereotypic behavior of ASD and motor delays.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 52

Arishe, Olufunke
Priviero, Fernanda
Wilczynski, Stephanie
Interleukin-18 Enhances Contractile Responses to Phenylephrine in Pudendal Artery from Wistar Rats
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Abstract Text

Background: The etiology of essential hypertension remains unclear, and its mechanisms are complex. Inflammation is a complex phenomenon, comprises the first response of the immune system in the presence of harmful stimuli and is considered to be a major cause of increased blood pressure. Indeed, low-grade inflammation and activation of the immune system have been implicated in hypertension. Cytokine levels are elevated in hypertension and have been reported to be implicated in the associated disturbances in vascular reactivity reported in this disease. Clinical and population studies have consistently found increased circulating levels of interleukin 18 (IL-18) in patients with hypertension. Hypothesis: This study tests the hypothesis that IL-18 will enhance contractile responses to phenylephrine in isolated arterial rings from rats. Methods: Vascular function was performed on isolated pudendal arteries from male Wistar rats using wire myographs, kept in Krebs solution at 37°C, constantly aerated with 95%O2/5%CO2. Concentration-response curves to phenylephrine (PE; 10-9-3x10-5M) were performed in the absence or in the presence of IL-18 (20ng/ml) for one hour. Ten minutes prior to the incubation with IL-18, some arterial rings were incubated separately with the following agents: NADPH oxidase 2 inhibitor, gp91 ds-tat (10-5M); NADPH oxidase 1 and 4 inhibitor, GKT137831(10-6M); and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MKK / MEK) inhibitor, PD98059 (10-5M) Concentration-response curves were analyzed using non-linear regression analysis. Data are presented as mean ± S.E.M. Statistical significance set at p

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Columbia Ballroom (CMCC upper level)
 Poster: 180

Purcaro, Kylie McClary, Jacqueline Finding Femininity in the Corporate World
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Abstract Text

During the summer between my Junior and Senior year at the University of South Carolina, I had the opportunity to work as a Sales Management Intern for Frito-Lay, based out of their office in Columbia, South Carolina. This experience pushed me out of my comfort zone, as I had little Sales experience and had never worked in a company with the resources, size, and product portfolio that Frito-Lay has. As soon as my first day started in June, I hit the ground running and made sure I made the most of my 40 hours every week. Through this experience, I grew my professional, analytical, and personal skills through my summer-long project. I was tasked with closing product distribution voids across small-format stores in the Columbia area, which required analyzing data through Power BI Analytics, communicating with store managers to sell in products to their shelves, coming up with creative ways to communicate with the salespeople, and presenting my findings and solutions to members of different leadership teams. I came across several obstacles along the way, one being the stereotypes I faced while doing my job. Many times, I was dealing with older men who had been in the workforce for longer than I was even alive, so I faced many demeaning comments and conversations that offput the validity of my work. However, to combat this, I was able to join a Women’s Employee Resource Group and set up informational phone calls with successful female leaders in the company to learn about their experiences and develop strategies to combat some of these comments that I received in the market and on the job. I learned how to stick up for myself and build my credibility in the office by always asking questions, following through, and going above and beyond to deliver results. These inspiring women who helped me through these situations and gave me advice inspired me to follow my dream of attending law school to pursue business law to advocate for gender equality in the workplace.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 180

Brody, Annalee Murillo, Crystal Graduation with Leadership Distinction in Professional and Civic Engagement: The Interconnectedness of Public Health
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As a student with a major in the sciences, I have always been taught that finding a solution is linear. This path is more formally known as the scientific method. The scientific method, which was first conceptualized in the 16th century, has since been taught in nearly every American middle, high, and college environment. Yet, during my time studying public health, I realized that the path is fluid and not always linear. There are many factors that can play into a specific problem. How do we approach all of them? How do we recognize them? I have learned that public health problems are multi-dimensional, with numerous factors from individual genetics to socioeconomic status each potentially playing a role in the presence of an issue. The idea of multi-dimensional problems in public health was supported through my experience as a Project Assistant with Zenger Strategies. As a project assistant, I am mainly responsible for research and graphic design initiatives for various consulting projects in the public health and healthcare space. My experience with this project revealed the connectedness of these and public health issues. The project focused on identifying if youth substance abuse warranted attendance at a recovery high school in the Midlands region. Recovery high schools have the standard curriculum of a public high school while also providing supplementary programming to encourage students on their recovery journey. Acknowledging the many factors contributing to youth substance abuse treatment and recovery helped us to provide the necessary guidance to the client on their decision to pursue a recovery high school. By addressing the many dimensions from individual motivation to the learning environment, we were able to assist our clients with this individual decision making and develop a report that was valuable to the Midlands community.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 194

Bridges, Kaitlin Nag, Anita The Role of SARS-CoV Non-structural Protein 1 in Cytoplasmic Stress Granule Formation
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Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV and SARS-CoV-2) encoded nonstructural protein 1 (nsp1) is known to suppress host gene expression, known as host shutoff. Nsp1 interacts with host proteins that facilitate nsp1 to block host protein synthesis by cellular protein translation factors. Nsp1 also triggers the degradation of host messenger RNA (mRNA) while keeping the viral RNA intact. During viral infection, stalled host mRNA accumulates in non-membranous vesicles, known as stress granules (SGs). This allows mRNA to be protected until stress ceases. Previously, we used BioID2-mediated proximity labeling followed by LC-MS/MS to identify proteins that have transient interaction with nsp1. This method identified about 114 strong interactors including multiple members of the stress granule complex. Given the role of nsp1 in degrading mRNAs, we suspected that this viral protein may modify the composition of SGs to prevent it from protecting host mRNAs. To identify any compositional changes by nsp1, we successfully adapted and optimized SG isolation methods using human embryonic kidney (HEK) cells, with and without nsp1 expression. We found both nsp1 and G3BP1 accumulate in isolated SGs while GAPDH protein was excluded, as expected. Using immunoblot, we analyzed the proteins present in SGs from cells with and without nsp1 expression after different time intervals of stress induction. We found that SG-associated protein G3BP1 dissociates from SGs overtime in the presence of nsp1. We further isolated the RNA from these SGs following standard protocols. Using mRNAs that specifically accumulate in SGs in normal cells, we are now studying the effect of nsp1 and mRNA trafficking to SGs in the presence of nsp1. We expect our results to uncover the mechanism that enables host mRNAs to be degraded during viral infection.

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Exhibit Hall (CMCC lower level)
 Poster: 91

Nguyen, Kenny Nathe, Kristen
Kern, Elizabeth
TT-TG Distance & Fulkerson Osteotomy for Patellofemoral Instability: A Case Report
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Case 15 y/o male with a BMI of 44 kg/m2 with a complicated course with dislocation of his patella laterally. He has had a history of multiple right knee re-injuries with patellar dislocations following previous right knee surgery in 2019. Maltracking and patellofemoral pain despite adequate trial of non-operative interventions. Prior injury course: 11/2019 Right knee arthroscopy w/ MPFL repair OATS procedure for repair of lateral femoral condyle OCD lesions 11/2020 Re-injury Repeated course of PT and bracing 05/2021 Another re-injury while playing basketball New-onset knee instability w/ ambulation, swelling, weakness of R LE Physical Exam: Right knee effusion Tenderness to palpation over patella + lateralization and subluxation Almost able to dislocate patella at full extension Imaging: CT Right Knee demonstrated evidence of multiple lateral patellar dislocations, some patellofemoral osteoarthritis, hypoplastic trochlear groove, and patellar maltracking with tilted lateral subluxation. Patient’s TT-TG distance = 23 mm. Procedure: Right knee arthroscopy and debridement Prophylactic fasciotomy of anterior compartment Open anterior tibial tubercleplasty Tubercle translated 10 mm medially Three 5.0mm cannulated headless compression screws used for fixation Open lateral release MPFL reconstruction with gracilis allograft Post-Op Course: PT 2-3x/week, HEP, bracing 2 wks post-op: Pt reports minimal pain and does not require pain medication 6 wks post-op: No evidence of patellar instability Discussion: Patients with recurrent patellar instability may fail conservative interventions due to improper biomechanics Recurrent dislocation may further injury and worsen degenerative wear of the patellar cartilage Fulkerson procedure can be used to realign the patella, with studies showing outcomes ranging from 93–97% of patients demonstrating improvement in function with no evidence of serious complications, with 86.4% of patients maintaining near-normal ROM, minimal pain, and no limp at 4- to 12- year follow-up.2,3,4 Post-operative rehabilitation is an important part of regaining function and range of motion

9:30-11:00 a.m.
Columbia Ballroom (CMCC upper level)
 Poster: 91

Simmons, Timothy Quattlebaum, Mary
Kipp, Colby
Sweeney, Allison
Levine, Sydney
Loncar, Haylee
Wilson, Dawn
The Effects of a Racial Socialization Intervention on Improving Well-being and Health Outcomes in African American Adolescents
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Abstract Text

African American (AA) adolescents and their families are exposed to numerous social and environmental chronic stressors, including racial discrimination. Given that AA families are exposed to chronic stressors (including racial stressors), further research is needed to better promote positive family coping and resilience to improve engagement in health promotion initiatives. Studies on resilience have shown that parents’ ability to promote racial socialization for AA adolescents in coping with racial discrimination is beneficial for adolescent psychological health, academic performance, and self-regulation. However, no previous study has developed a program based on these methods to increase physical activity (PA) in overweight AA adolescents which may also lead to improvements in coping, well-being, and health outcomes. Based on Family Systems Theory and a Resilience framework, this pilot intervention integrated positive coping skills, and social racialization skills (promoting positive communication strategies, coping strategies to counteract racial bias and distrust, and fostering egalitarianism and emotional regulation). A total of 16 families were randomized to either a 10-week online virtual family-based racial socialization intervention or an online virtual health education comparison program (adolescents: age = 14.60 ± 1.82; M BMI percentile = 97.0; 62.5% female; parents: age = 48.20 ± 9.87; BMI = 40.82 ± 6.84; 100% female). Treatment means revealed that adolescents in the online intervention demonstrated a larger increase in their average daily minutes of moderate-to-vigorous MVPA (baseline: M = 5.92, SE = 2.30; post-intervention: M = 22.30, SE = 11.8) than adolescents in the online comparison program (baseline: M = 9.58, SE = 3.68; post-intervention: M = 14.85, SE = 7.78). On average, adolescents in the intervention increased their MVPA by 16.38 minutes/day (vs. 5.27 minutes/day in the comparison), which is considered a clinically meaningful increase. Adolescents in the online intervention also