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Diversity

Student Blog

Join students at the USC School of Medicine Greenville on their journeys to become exceptional physician leaders by following the student blog. The links below are blog posts that specifically highlight diversity topics.

A Complete Education: Learning Respect Despite Differences

Though I may only be a little over three months into medical school, the rigor of the curriculum has already begun to swell my brain with knowledge of biochemistry, cell biology, physiology, anatomy, histology, and all of the other content areas we must become familiar with to progress in our medical knowledge and to prepare for medical practice. Every day I learn more about the immense complexity of the human body. At times I am frustrated by the difficulty of learning certain material, and other times I am intrigued by a certain pathway or component of physiology leading me to investigate further. Despite the difficulty and pace of the learning, I am growing to love learning more each day. I have come to recognize a component of this education lately that I think we ought to pay more attention to.

Faith, Religiosity, and Spirituality in Medicine

Religion is a very complex and even frustrating discipline to study and explore. The current era presents humanity with the remarkable opportunity to actively engage in interreligious dialogue. The Western world has been historically based upon dualities and separations. The humanities, the sciences, and other areas of thought have been compartmentalized from one another. Western medicine has proven to be a field that has attempted to separate science from existential philosophy, religiosity, and faith in order to understand the physical world in a logical, cohesive manner. Can we really separate these areas of the human experience from one another? With modernity causing different ethnic and religious populations to live and work closely with one another, different religious traditions have become more integrated into the social framework. In order to treat the wholeness of the individual, should we not be cognizant that there is more to caring for others than our medical knowledge and prescriptions?

Positive Exposure

Imagine being a fashion photographer and photographing some of the most beautiful people in the industry. Imagine jetting off to New York, Milan, or Paris at a moment’s notice and working alongside fashion icons and supermodels. This was the life of award winning fashion photographer Rick Guidotti. Then, everything changed when he saw an albino girl on the streets of New York.

Summer in San Fran

This past summer, I had an amazing opportunity to intern at BridgeHIV in San Francisco, CA. I worked alongside doctors and researchers to discover effective prevention strategies that will reduce the impact of HIV/AIDS globally. I also had the opportunity to spread awareness about HIV/AIDS in the community, which included marching in Pride. Marching in Pride was such a surreal experience. It was a day of liberation, a day where men who could parade the streets as Beyoncé without an ounce of criticism or a transman could kiss a loved one in public. Everywhere I looked, there was love and acceptance. It was amazing to witness people set aside their differences and come together to celebrate one cause: equal rights for the LGTBQ community.

The Subconscious: A Hidden Monster

A man and his son were in an accident, and each was rushed to the emergency room. As the young boy was wheeled into an operating room, the trauma surgeon took one look at him, then quickly left the operating room exclaiming, “I can’t work on him. He’s my son.” Who is the surgeon?

White Coats for Black Lives

The hashtags #Blacklivesmatter and #whitecoats4blacklives have been dominating social media for the past month. Pictures of people protesting and medical students participating in “die-in” demonstrations at their medical schools have also surfaced. How did we end up here? Racial tension between African Americans and the police has been a longstanding, controversial issue. Only July 17, 2014, Eric Garner died after a white police officer, Daniel Pantaleo, put him in a chokehold, even though he repeated to the police officer, “I can’t breathe.” The grand jury decided not to indict Officer Pantaleo based on a lack of evidence. One month later, an African American teenager named Michael Brown was shot and killed by a white police officer named Darren Wilson. The jury did not have enough evidence to indict Officer Wilson of any wrongdoing. However, political unrest swept the nation because many people believed that the Eric Garner and Michael Brown’s deaths were due to the color of their skin.

 

In The News

Diversity needed in the medical profession
The Greenville News - September 4, 2015

Grant aims to increase physician diversity
The Greenville News - August 10, 2015