Recent Stories

How to make it in film, TV

How to make it in film, TV

This week when comic book fans take over part of San Diego for the annual ComicCon, one University of South Carolina alumnus will be brining it to the masses. That's because Blake Garris works for Marvel Comics, running parts of the comic company's website, including live streaming and creating videos from the famous comic convention.

Professor says teaching is a privilege

Professor says teaching is a privilege

Maryah Fram has a book in her office that she invites students to write in before they graduate, saying what they are going to do to make the world a better place. It's just one of the ways she connects with her students. A social work professor, Fram's focus is social policy and teaching the graduate-level class for students to apply what they've learned to real-life situations.

Education of a teacher

Education of a teacher

Push and pull have helped move Odell Glenn through a wide-ranging career in engineering. He has pushed to follow his passions, he has been pulled in unexpected directions, and he finds himself at the University of South Carolina as a late-career doctoral candidate. He says he wouldn't have changed the journey in any way.

Not easy being green

Not easy being green

When Melissa Pilgrim's undergraduate students suit up for research, they don't reach for white lab coats and safety glasses. Instead, they don waders, battery-powered headlamps and lots of bug spray before heading into damp woodlands after dusk.

40 years and counting: Business school veteran makes another move

40 years and counting: Business school veteran makes another move

Julia Witherspoon is a sucker for something new: a new opportunity, a new responsibility, a new center or even a new building. New has oddly been a theme of her nearly 40-year career with the Darla Moore School of Business. This month, she has experienced new once more as the faculty and staff of the business school have begun moving into their new home at Assembly and Greene streets.

Stemming the tide of cancer

Stemming the tide of cancer

Curing cancer, not just putting a patient in remission. That's what Hexin Chen and other researchers are trying to make possible with the new cancer stem cell approach to oncology.

No Limits: Shelbretta Ball finds a new way to be on the team

No Limits: Shelbretta Ball finds a new way to be on the team

Basketball has been a part of Shelbretta "Brett" Ball's life since she was 5 years old. Even before she scored any points for the Gamecocks, a medical condition put her on the bench. But she's still on the team and contributing in a new way.

Serbia on his mind

Serbia on his mind

When Philip Mattox walked across Carolina's commencement stage this past May, his dream was to somehow forge a career in Serbia -- a country he's grown to embrace after traveling there as a student, meeting its people and studying Balkan history and culture. A week later, parts of his adopted country were underwater.

Nothing to hide

Nothing to hide

Aisha Haynes overcame a stuttering affliction on her way to a doctorate in curriculum instruction and a position at UofSC's Center for Teaching Excellence as an instructional designer.

The world's biggest field

The world's biggest field

For the last few weeks, Brazil has been at the center of the world's attention as the best soccer players from across the globe compete for the ultimate trophy. Amidst the fans and excitement, the cheers and the tears, two University of South Carolina students reached the pinnacle of their college experience at this year's World Cup.

String Project finds harmony in community

String Project finds harmony in community

Hearing a child's first draw of a bow across the strings of a violin can make your ears bleed, but for University of South Carolina graduate student Katie Holaway, it is music to her ears.

Antibiotics, infants and food allergy

Antibiotics, infants and food allergy

Food allergies in children are becoming more common, and antibiotics might be part of the problem. Pharmacy researcher Bryan Love led a team that showed antibiotic exposure in infants is associated with increased likelihood of later diagnosis of food allergy.

Capstone adventures to Peru for Maymester

Capstone adventures to Peru for Maymester

Less than a month into her job as assistant principal for the Capstone Scholars program, Erin Wilson was asked to take a group of students to Peru. The trip was inspiring, rewarding and a little scary at times, but well worth it, she says.

Home again

Home again

U.S. Secret Service agent Pat Keegan has set foot on nearly every continent, chasing counterfeiters, investigating fraud and protecting major U.S. political leaders. But he calls his latest assignment as assistant special agent in charge of the Columbia, S.C., field office one of the best of his 25-year federal career.

A house undivided

A house undivided

Mount Vernon has captured the American imagination for centuries. Now University of South Carolina professor Lydia Brandt is researching how and why.

Ironing out details of the carbon cycle

Ironing out details of the carbon cycle

Iron is an essential element in all living creatures, and its availability in seawater can have a profound effect on phytoplankton growth and, consequently, the Earth's carbon cycle. In the journal Nature, Seth John and Tim Conway have just published an assessment of the various sources of dissolved iron in the north Atlantic Ocean.

Children looking for a home

Children looking for a home

An estimated 100,000 children, mostly from Central American countries, will pour over the border between the U.S. and Mexico this year. They will be alone, frightened, hungry and exhausted from their journey that exposed them to dangers unimaginable to most American children. But for them and their families, the risk of making the trip alone or in small groups is less than remaining in their home countries.

Seeking quality care, everywhere

Seeking quality care, everywhere

Just a year and a half after arriving at the University of South Carolina, Jan Eberth has already found success in bringing attention to places where health care disparities are the greatest.

Last out, first in

Last out, first in

You could define Steven Gantt with "firsts" and "lasts" -- first in his family to graduate college, first to travel extensively outside of South Carolina, last of nine children. But here is the word Gantt uses to define himself -- family.

Cocky for a Reason

Cocky for a Reason

James Armstrong III will look back on his undergraduate experience a little different than most. His view, in and out of costume, is what propels him forward towards his goals. He was Cocky for a reason. Literally.

A full experience

A full experience

Sheimaliz Glover's dream just came true and the recent graduate credits her time at the University of South Carolina to setting her on her way to becoming an ambassador and working in the foreign service.

Mosquito math

Mosquito math

University of South Carolina Beaufort professor Kasia Pawelek uses mathematical models to predict mosquito population growth and measure the effectiveness of Beaufort County's mosquito control program.

Finding cyber solutions

Finding cyber solutions

Cutting an experiment's time from 3 months to 3 days is every researcher's dream. Phil Moore and his team in Research Cyberinfrastructure did just that for a Carolina scientist running a computer simulation, and they're looking for opportunities to achieve similar success all over campus.