2016 Archive


PASOs: Step by step

September 20, 2016, Craig Brandhorst

Julie Smithwick began laying the groundwork for PASOs as part of a field placement project for her master’s in social work in 2005. Now based at the Arnold School of Public Health, the statewide organization provides health care education and resource navigation to 8,500 Latinos a year and boasts a budget of $1.3 million.

eboni nelson

Engineering equality

July 18, 2016

The legal profession has been called one of the least diverse in the country. And while countless attempts have been made within the legal industry to ameliorate the problem, University of South Carolina School of Law professor Eboni Nelson believes the key to real change starts with law schools.

Sophie Keyes

Student puts disability access center stage

June 10, 2016, Erin Mikes

Broadcast journalism major Sophie Keyes will place the public need for greater disability access center stage when she competes in the Miss South Carolina pageant in late June. Inspired by her father’s work and her friend’s need for greater wheelchair access, the senior from Clinton, South Carolina, has made disability access the focus of her platform as she competes in pageants.

students with the program director of MAPP

There's a M.A.P.P. for that

May 16, 2016, Craig Brandhorst

Like many new college students, Tamaragail Tarrant, Trevor Prioleau and Kennette Smalls came to the University of South Carolina with few connections and plenty of nervous energy. Navigating a campus the size of UofSC can be intimidating, and all three students describe themselves as shy, whether or not they seem that way when you meet them. Luckily, the three got involved with the university’s Multicultural Assistance Peer Program, a peer-to-peer student mentoring program for students with multicultural backgrounds, and found everything they need to fit in, have fun and get the most from their college experience.

greener statue

Deconstructing Reconstruction

April 14, 2016, Peggy Binette

Reconstruction was the first chapter in America’s civil rights movement. And its influence on race relations continues across the country and on college campuses, although few may realize its connection. Now 150 years later, the University of South Carolina’s History Center and Historic Columbia hopes to deepen public understanding of Reconstruction’s history and racial legacy with a symposium April 21–22.

Marjorie Spruill

Divided we stand

March 17, 2016, Peggy Binette

History professor Marjorie Spruill will give a public talk about how the events that divided American women in the 1970s are connected to the polarized politics that has gripped America since 1980. Her talk, which will take place at 6 p.m. March 22 in Capstone House, is based on forthcoming book with Bloomsbury Press, titled “Divided We Stand: Women’s Rights, Family Values & the Polarization of American Politics.”

Anita Singleton-Prather

Sacred music and Gullah culture showcased this weekend

February 22, 2016, Glenn Hare

Noted Gullah storyteller and singer Anita Singleton-Prather, along with the Gullah Kinfolk, will share stories and songs at “Shared Traditions: Sacred Music in the South,” a two-day symposium featuring shape-note singing, African-American spirituals and other music traditions unique to the South. The symposium starts with a meet-and-greet with Singleton-Prather at 3:30 p.m. Friday (Feb. 26) in the McKissick Museum on the historic Horseshoe.

Alysha baratta

A passion for social justice

January 19, 2016, Peggy Binette

Civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr. said, “The function of education is to teach one to think intensively and to think critically. Intelligence plus character — that is the goal of true education.” Four individuals, emboldened by King to ensure social, political and economic equality for all people, were honored by the University of South Carolina for their community service and social justice work at the annual MLK commemoration breakfast.