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College of Information and Communications


Farrar Award in Media & Civil Rights History

Previous Recipients

This award recognizes the best journal article or chapter in an edited book on the historical relationship between media and civil rights published during the previous two years.

View the Farrar Award lectures by clicking on the links provided.

Gwyneth Mellinger

Gwenyth Mellinger

Gwenyth Mellinger, director of James Madison University’s School of Media Arts and Design, took home the 2019 Ronald T. and Gayla D. Farrar Award, for her paper which explored a 1940s effort to publish African American newspaper columnist Charles S. Johnson in white newspapers. 

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R. Joseph Parrott - 2017

R. Joseph Parrott, a postdoctoral fellow at Yale University, won the 2017 Farrar Award for his article published in the July–September 2015 issue of Race & Class: “A Luta Continua: Radical Filmmaking, Pan-African Liberation and Communal Empowerment.”

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Mark J. Walmsley - 2015

Mark J. Walmsley, a Ph.D. student at the University of Leeds, won the 2015 Farrar Award for his article "Tell It Like It Isn't: SNCC and the Media 1960-1965" published in the February 2014 issue of Journal of American Studies.

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Carol A. Stabile - 2013

Dr. Carol A. Stabile, professor at the University of Oregon, won the 2013 Farrar Award for her article published in the September 2011 issue of Communication and Critical/Cultural Studies: "The Typhoid Marys of the Left: Gender, Race and the Broadcast Blacklist."

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William P. Hustwit - 2012

William P. Hustwit, visiting assistant professor of history at the University of Mississippi, won the 2012 Farrar Award for his article “From Caste To Color Blindness: James J. Kilpatrick’s Segregationist Semantics” published in the August 2011 issue of The Journal of Southern History.

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Gordan Mantler - 2011

Gordon Mantler, lecturing fellow in the Thompson Writing Program at Duke University, won the Farrar Award for his article "'The Press Did You In': The Poor People's Campaign and the Mass Media," published in the Spring 2010 issue of The Sixties: A Journal of History, Politics and Culture.