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Department of Anthropology

Anthropology Honors College Courses

 

Spring 2021

 

Anthropology 161.H01 / Human Origins: An Intro to Biological Anthropology

TR / 10:05 – 11:20 / Face-to-Face Lecture in Gambrell 412

 Lab / Web - Asynchronous

Professor: Kelly Goldberg

(4 credits) 

FOR HONORS COLLEGE STUDENTS ONLY 

Can be used as a Prerequisite in place of ANTH 101 within the Major & Minor

AND

Fulfills 4 hrs of the Carolina Core Requirements for the Scientific Literacy’s 8 hrs

OR

Can be used as the Lab Requirement for the DURT Track 

(Note: This course can be used as a Prerequisite for the Anthropology Major and it can also be used for 4 hrs of the Carolina Core Requirements for the Science Literacy’s 8 credits at the same time. This course cannot be used to satisfy any credits for the Social Science GSS Carolina Core Requirement) 

Course Readings:

No required texts 

Course Description:

This four-credit course satisfies the College of Arts and Sciences requirement for a Lab Science Course.  It can also meet the Anthropology Major prerequisite requirement and the Anthropology Minor requirement in place of ANTH 101.  It meets for two one hour and fifteen-minute lectures and a required two-hour lab.  Students should take either ANTH 101 or ANTH 161, and not take both courses due to some course overlap. The course is an introduction to the science of biological anthropology. Biological anthropology is a subfield of anthropology that emphasizes a focus on humanity and its origin from a biological perspective.  As a subfield of Anthropology, biological anthropology recognizes the complex interaction of biology and culture in the evolutionary development of the human species.  In this class we study the basic concepts and mechanisms of evolution and the evolutionary history of humankind from primate beginnings to anatomically and behaviorally modern Homo sapiens. The course is divided into 3 sections: 1) the science of anthropology and the models and mechanisms of human evolution; 2) modern human variation and adaptation, and our relationships to non-human primates; and 3) the origin, development, and dispersal of humans using evidence from the fossil record (paleoanthropology) and archaeological remains. Along the way, it illustrates the ways in which anthropologists learn about the past and how we can use our knowledge of the past to understand the present.  The weekly labs will address subjects including genetics, human variation, primate anatomy and behavior, human anatomy, fossil hominids, and archaeological dating techniques.


Anthropology 161.H02 / Human Origins: An Intro to Biological Anthropology

TR / 1:15 – 2:30 / Face-to-Face Lecture in Gambrell 412

 Lab / Web - Asynchronous

      Professor: Kelly Goldberg

     (4 credits) 

FOR HONORS COLLEGE STUDENTS ONLY 

Can be used as a Prerequisite in place of ANTH 101 within the Major & Minor

AND

Fulfills 4 hrs of the Carolina Core Requirements for the Scientific Literacy’s 8 hrs

OR

Can be used as the Lab Requirement for the DURT Track 

(Note: This course can be used as a Prerequisite for the Anthropology Major and it can also be used for 4 hrs of the Carolina Core Requirements for the Science Literacy’s 8 credits at the same time. This course cannot be used to satisfy any credits for the Social Science GSS Carolina Core Requirement) 

Course Readings:

No required texts 

Course Description:

This four-credit course satisfies the College of Arts and Sciences requirement for a Lab Science Course.  It can also meet the Anthropology Major prerequisite requirement and the Anthropology Minor requirement in place of ANTH 101.  It meets for two one hour and fifteen-minute lectures and a required two-hour lab.  Students should take either ANTH 101 or ANTH 161, and not take both courses due to some course overlap. The course is an introduction to the science of biological anthropology. Biological anthropology is a subfield of anthropology that emphasizes a focus on humanity and its origin from a biological perspective.  As a subfield of Anthropology, biological anthropology recognizes the complex interaction of biology and culture in the evolutionary development of the human species.  In this class we study the basic concepts and mechanisms of evolution and the evolutionary history of humankind from primate beginnings to anatomically and behaviorally modern Homo sapiens. The course is divided into 3 sections: 1) the science of anthropology and the models and mechanisms of human evolution; 2) modern human variation and adaptation, and our relationships to non-human primates; and 3) the origin, development, and dispersal of humans using evidence from the fossil record (paleoanthropology) and archaeological remains. Along the way, it illustrates the ways in which anthropologists learn about the past and how we can use our knowledge of the past to understand the present.  The weekly labs will address subjects including genetics, human variation, primate anatomy and behavior, human anatomy, fossil hominids, and archaeological dating techniques.


 ANTH 392.001 & .H10 / Global Women’s Health

TR / 11:40 – 12:55 / Face-to-Face in Hamilton 140

Professor: Kathryn Luchok

(3 credits) 

Meets with Honors Anth 392.H10 and WGST 392.H10 

Fulfills the Cultural Requirement for the Anthropology Major 

Medical Minor Requirement 

Course Readings:

Please go to the USC Bookstore to find what books you will need for this course:

https://sc.bncollege.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/TBWizardView?catalogId=10001&langId=-1&storeId=10052 

Course Description:

This course examines health issues important in the lives of women around the world. The course will take a life cycle approach beginning with issues surrounding the birth of girl babies, continuing through the period of growth and development, adulthood, including family planning, pregnancy and lactation and ending with old age. Drawing on medical and applied anthropology perspectives, the course will cover the sociocultural landscape of women’s lives, including the forces that promote and hinder the health and well-being of women around the globe. Also examined are programs aimed at improving women’s lives world-wide. The goal of this course is to provide students with a clearer understanding of the female life cycle with a greater appreciation for the mental, physical and social health risks women face, as well as the resilience and strengths women bring, on a global scale. 

This class will be of interest to students interested in global issues, culture and health and/or women’s health, including but not limited to those in Anthropology, Global Studies, WGST, Public Health, Nursing, Social Work, Education, Sociology, Political Science and Psychology.  It is a required course for the Medical Anthropology Minor.

 


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