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Department of Anthropology

Archaeology Courses

Spring 2021

ANTH 219.001 / Great Discoveries in Archaeology

MWF / 9:40 – 10:30 / Face-to-Face Lecture in Gambrell 412

Professor: Joanna Casey

(3 credits) 

Fulfills 3 hrs of the Archaeological Requirement for the Anthropology 

Course Readings:

None.  Weekly readings will be available

Course Description: 

This course is a romp through the world’s great archaeological discoveries with a view to making students literate in world archaeology.  For most people, the word archaeology conjures up images of pyramids, gold and faraway places, of civilizations lost and found and the swashbuckling adventurers who brought these finds to light.  This course shamelessly panders to popular perceptions of archaeology by introducing students to the well-known sites and artifacts that have shaped our view of the past from the advent of modern humans to the beginning of written records.  We will look at the causes and consequences of the developments in the human career, and also at the hoaxes, frauds and bad science that plague popular views of the human past.  By the end of this course, students will know what archaeologists know about how and why the big events in human prehistory occurred, will be able to identify the sites and artifacts that have captured the public imagination and shaped our thinking about the past and will be able to critically evaluate the way archaeological ideas and things are presented in the popular media. 

Presentation:

Lectures, films, readings

Evaluation:
Mid term test, final exam, term paper, quizzes and response papers.


 ANTH 229.001 / Southeastern Archaeology

T / 11:40 – 12:55 / Web – Synchronous

R / 11:40 – 12:55 / Face-to-Face in Gambrell 412

Professor: Eric Jones

(3 credits)

Fulfills the Archaeological Requirement for the Anthropology Major 

Course Readings:

Please go to the USC Bookstore to find what books you will need for this course:

https://sc.bncollege.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/TBWizardView?catalogId=10001&langId=-1&storeId=10052 

Course Description:

How much have you learned about the Native American history of the place in which you are now living? During this course, we will study the past experiences of Indigenous people and societies of Southeastern North America from an archaeological perspective. We will start with the earliest inhabitants of the region who lived here over 14,000 years ago and will move through time, exploring the people and their ways of life across the region. We will conclude with early Native American-European interactions in the 16th and 17th-centuries. We will not just read about the archaeology. We will be doing it! We will research archaeological sites. Then, we will bring together what we have learned in class discussions to describe and explain what life was like at particular times and places in the Southeast. Throughout the semester, we will examine the relationship between American archaeology and Indigenous communities, the ethics of archaeological investigation in the United States, and the applicability of archaeological knowledge to address current problems. 


 ANTH 320.001 / Archaeology Theory

MW / 3:55 – 5:10 / Face-to-Face Lecture in Gambrell 412

Professor: Joanna Casey

(3 credits) 

Fulfills the Archaeological Requirement for the Anthropology Major

AND

Integrative Requirement (INT) 

Course Readings:

None.  Weekly readings will be available 

Course Description:

How do archaeologists figure out what happened in the past?   The artifacts they dig up provide clues, but how do archaeologists know what those clues mean?  This course is about the ideas that frame archaeological research. Those ideas have changed dramatically throughout the more than 100 years of archaeology’s history, determining the questions that archaeologists ask about the past, the kinds of material remains they search for, and the answers they find acceptable.  The past takes on different forms when peered at through different theoretical lenses, so how can we know what really happened in the past, and why does it matter?  While most archaeologists get interested in archaeology because of the artifacts and excavations, it is the ideas that make them continue.  

Presentation:

Lectures, films, readings 

Evaluation:
Participation in discussions, response papers, Assignments (4), Presentations


ANTH 328.001 / Ancient Civilizations

TR / 10:05 – 11:20 / Face-to-Face Lecture in Hamilton 140

Professor: Adam King

(3 credits) 

Fulfills the Archaeological Requirement for the Anthropology Major 

NOTE: This was Anth 341 and cannot be taken twice, except for Grade Forgiveness 

Course Readings:

Readings will be posted in BlackBoard. 

Course Description:

One of the things that history teaches us is that great civilizations rise and fall. Even our own will someday fall. In this class we will explore the history of some of the world’s great civilizations, like those that developed in ancient Egypt, Mesopotamia, China, and Central America. All ancient civilizations had some form of record keeping, but their beginnings often happened before their history was recorded. For this reason, we will explore these ancient civilizations through the lens of archaeology—the material remains of past behaviors. During this course you will learn what is meant by the term civilization and how to use archaeology to study civilizations. You will leave the course with an in-depth understanding of some of the world’s greatest civilizations. 

Course Methods:

Methods of instruction will typically include, but will not be limited to, the following:

  1. Lectures
  2. Class Discussion
  3. Multi-media Presentations
  4. Written projects 

Learning Outcomes:

After completing this class, students will understand the

  1. General principles of archaeological research
  2. Characteristics of the state and civilizations
  3. Basic issues involved in the rise of states and civilizations
  4. Development of many of the world’s ancient civilizations 

Evaluation:

Your grade for this class will be determined in the following manner:

Attendance                           10%

Video Response Sheet       20%

Area Summaries                  50%

Comparative Paper              20%

 

A 90-100%                C 70-76%

B+ 87-89%                D+ 67-69%

B 80-86%                   D 60-67%

C+ 77-79%                F Below 60%

 


 


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