Skip to Content

Department of Anthropology

700 Level Anthropology

Spring 2021

 

ANTH 711.001 / Professionalism and Ethics

T / 10:05 - 12:50 / 100% WEB – Synchronous & Asynchronous

Professor: John Doering-White

(3 credits) 

Course Readings:

Please go to the USC Bookstore to find what books you will need for this course:

https://sc.bncollege.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/TBWizardView?catalogId=10001&langId=-1&storeId=10052 

Course Description:

This course explores ethics and professionalism in anthropological research. Following a workshop model, students will formulate proposals to conduct original anthropological research and provide feedback to each other throughout the semester. In addition to proposal feedback, we will also explore how we as researchers harmonize ethical responsibilities, political commitments, and professional goals as we go about designing research, securing funding, conducting fieldwork, and sharing our findings with various audiences.


 ANTH 751.001 / Archaeological Research Design & Analysis

MW / 3:55 – 5:10 / Face-to-Face in Hamilton 143

Professor: Steve Smith

(3 credits)

Course Readings:

No textbook.  Students will be responsible for reading and comprehending selected readings.  Some will be selected by the professor and found on blackboard, others will be discovered by the students and shared with fellow students.

Course Description:

An overview of skills required to design and organize archaeological field and laboratory research.   How archaeologists know what they know.  The application of the scientific method in archaeology.  Creating and designing research problems in archaeological studies.  Integrating theory and methodology.  Formulation and testing of hypotheses.  Methodological issues in theory, field work, and laboratory analysis. Evaluating results and publishing. 

Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of the course, students will understand how science works to gain concrete knowledge generally, and archaeology specifically.  They will apply class concepts to the development of a research design tailored to their individual thesis or dissertations.  


 ANTH 762.001 / Biological Anthropology Principles and Theory

F / 2:20 - 5:05 / 100% WEB - Synchronous

Professor: Sharon DeWitte

(3 credits) 

Course Readings:

Please go to the USC Bookstore to find what books you will need for this course:

https://sc.bncollege.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/TBWizardView?catalogId=10001&langId=-1&storeId=10052 

Course Description:

Biological anthropology is the study of the evolutionary history and biological diversity of modern humans and non-human primates.  This course provides an intensive review of the major theories of and principles underlying the subfield of biological anthropology as well as an overview of major methodological and analytical approaches. Course topics will include evolutionary theory, genetics, anthropological demography, bioarchaeology, human physiological, developmental and genetic adaptation, life history, and biocultural anthropology. We will primarily read current literature that demonstrate the ways in which biological anthropologists explore human diversity now and in the past and relevant historical literature to understand the development of the subfield.


 ANTH 782.001 / Language Ideology: Political Economy of Language Beliefs and Practices

W / 9:00 – 11:45 / 100% WEB - Synchronous

Professor: Sherina Feliciano-Santos

(3 credits) 

Cross-listed with LING 782.001 

Course Readings:

Please go to the USC Bookstore to find what books you will need for this course:

https://sc.bncollege.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/TBWizardView?catalogId=10001&langId=-1&storeId=10052 

Course Description:

As a theoretical orientation, research focused on language ideologies has been concerned with how people’s beliefs about languages and linguistic practices impact how they navigate their language use and how they evaluate others’ language use. Reflecting work in this field, this class will consider the different levels of awareness people have about their language use and beliefs. We will look at how language ideologies emerge within particular social, economic, political, historical, and cultural contexts which, in turn, are reflected in and productive of language hierarchies, erasures, and privileges. In this seminar, we will read works that influence, frame, and emerge from this analytical perspective. Students will be encouraged to draw on this analytical framework to study a language phenomenon of their interest. 

 

 


Challenge the conventional. Create the exceptional. No Limits.

©