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Department of Anthropology

Archaeology Courses

Spring 2020

ANTH 223.001 / Modernity, Archaeology, & the Recent Past

Professor: Terrance Weik

(3 credits) 

Fulfills 3 hrs of the Archaeological Requirement for the Anthropology Major and

GLD: Research 

NOTE: This was Anth 345: Historical Archaeology and cannot be taken twice,

except for Grade Forgiveness   

Course Readings:

Please go to the USC Bookstore to find what books you will need for this course:

https://sc.bncollege.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/TBWizardView?catalogId=10001&langId=-1&storeId=10052 

Other readings are on Blackboard. 

Course Description:

Historical archaeology is a field that examines the modern and contemporary past, with emphasis on material culture and archival evidence. This course explores text-aided, interdisciplinary, comparative, archaeological research.  Students investigate anthropological perspectives on topics such as colonialism, slavery, landscapes, inequality, technology, racism, capitalism, gender, and world heritage.  

Learning Objectives 

By the end of the semester students will be able to do the following

  1. Differentiate historical archaeology & other disciplinary approaches to the past.
  2. Apply archaeological research methods.   
  3. Understand anthropological, interdisciplinary, and comparative studies.    
  4. Explain core ideas and concepts that shape archaeological theories.
  5.  Identify historical places that constitute our national and global heritage.
  6. Identify ancient artifacts and the ways they are made and used

 ANTH 229.001 / Southeastern Archaeology

Professor: Gail Wagner

(3 credits) 

Fulfills the Archaeological Requirement for the Anthropology Major 

Course Readings:

Please go to the USC Bookstore to find what books you will need for this course:

https://sc.bncollege.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/TBWizardView?catalogId=10001&langId=-1&storeId=10052 

Course Description:

Investigate seven major issues in southeastern archaeology: initial colonization, mounding, pottery, domestication, the Hopewell Interaction Sphere, the Southeastern Ceremonial Complex, and foodways! This course begins with a brief introductory background on archaeology, as well as an overview of the cultures and the environmental setting of the Southeast. During the semester we progress from the first humans in the Southeast through time up into the early Colonial period when Europeans began to explore and settle the Southeast. Although one focus of the course is to characterize each of the cultural-temporal periods, the seven major lifeway issues we examine cross-cut those time periods. 

LEARNING OUTCOMES

Upon successful completion of ANTH 229, students will be able to:

  1. List the names and date ranges of the major cultural-temporal periods in the Southeast;
  2. Differentiate between the cultural periods by describing the climatic and cultural settings;
  3. Identify (who, what, where, when) major archaeological sites of the Southeast;
  4. List and discuss major issues in southeastern archaeology. 

Evaluation:

Course grades will be based on quizzes, assignments, and tests. Attendance is required. 

Course Presentation: 

This is a lecture course. Blackboard is heavily used. 

Audience: 

For students who are interested in archaeology or the Southeast, this is a basic introductory course taught about a region by discussing important issues. No prior knowledge of anthropology or archaeology is needed.


 ANTH 322.001 / Field School in Archaeology

Professor: Andrew White

(3 credits) 

Fulfills the Archaeological Requirement for the Anthropology Major or DURT and

GLD: Global Learning or Research 

Course Readings:

No textbook required 

Course Description:

This one-day-a-week archaeological field school will give you hands-on experience in basic excavation methods and techniques, including:

  • grid systems and mapping;
  • controlled hand excavation;
  • documentation of cultural features;
  • description of sediments;
  • record keeping and photography;
  • strategy, logistics, and teamwork. 

We will be working at a site along the Broad River that was used by prehistoric peoples over the course of at least 5000 years.  Previous work at the site revealed the presence of a series of prehistoric occupations buried within a natural sand levee. Our work at the site this semester will be focused on: (1) using careful hand excavation to collect detailed information about identified Late Archaic age (ca. 3500-1000 BC) deposits at the site; and (2) investigating deeply buried deposits that may date to the Early Archaic period (ca. 9000-7000 BC). 

We will depart from campus each Friday at 8:00 and return by 4:00 (transportation provided). Students will bring their own lunch. There are no formal bathroom facilities on site. Each student will be required to have a small set of personal field gear (e.g., small toolbox, gloves, mason’s trowel, 5m metric tape measure, notebook, etc.). Other tools and field equipment will be provided.


 ANTH 328.001 / Ancient Civilizations

Professor: Adam King

(3 credits) 

Fulfills the Archaeological Requirement for the Anthropology Major 

NOTE: This was Anth 341 and cannot be taken twice, except for Grade Forgiveness 

Course Readings:

Please go to the USC Bookstore to find what books you will need for this course:

https://sc.bncollege.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/TBWizardView?catalogId=10001&langId=-1&storeId=10052 

Course Description:

One of the things that history teaches us is that great civilizations rise and fall. Even our own will someday fall. In this class we will explore the history of some of the world’s great civilizations, like those that developed in ancient Egypt, Mesopotamia, China, and Central America. All ancient civilizations had some form of record keeping, but their beginnings often happened before their history was recorded. For this reason, we will explore these ancient civilizations through the lens of archaeology—the material remains of past behaviors. During this course you will learn what is meant by the term civilization and how to use archaeology to study civilizations. You will leave the course with an in-depth understanding of some of the world’s greatest civilizations. 

Course Methods

Methods of instruction will typically include, but will not be limited to, the following:

  1. Lectures
  2. Class Discussion
  3. Multi-media Presentations
  4. Written projects

 Learning Outcomes

After completing this class, students will understand the

  1. General principles of archaeological research
  2. Characteristics of the state and civilizations
  3. Basic issues involved in the rise of states and civilizations
  4. Development of many of the world’s ancient civilizations 

Evaluation

Your grade for this class will be determined in the following manner:

Attendance                              10%

Video Response Sheet        20%

Area Summaries                     50%

Comparative Paper               20% 

A  90-100%               C  70-76%

B+ 87-89%                D+ 67-69%

B 80-86%                   D 60-67%

C+ 77-79%                F Below 60%


 ANTH 550.001 / Archaeological Lab Methods 

Professor: Gail Wagner

(3 credits) 

Fulfills the Archaeological Requirement for the Anthropology Major and GLD: Research

OR

Can be used as the Lab Requirement for the DURT Track and GLD: Research

OR

Fulfills the 500-level(s) requirement(s) for the Major or for DURT and GLD: Research 

Course Readings:

Please go to the USC Bookstore to find what books you will need for this course:

https://sc.bncollege.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/TBWizardView?catalogId=10001&langId=-1&storeId=10052 

Course Description:

This practical course emphasizes hands-on identification of the common kinds of artifacts recovered from pre-Colonial archaeological sites and provides the basic knowledge needed to begin working in an archaeological laboratory. Topics covered include tabulation, replicability, curation, use of equipment, data presentation, and overview of literature. Emphasis is placed on ceramic and lithic basics, with an introduction to botanical and faunal basics. 

Learning Outcomes:

Upon successful completion of ANTH 550, students will be able to:

  1. Identify raw material classes of common archaeological artifacts (i.e., tabulate an artifact assemblage);
  2. Be able to distinguish human-made artifacts from natural objects;
  3. List and describe common basic analytical techniques for ceramic and lithic artifacts;
  4. Identify well-known analysts and link them with their body of work;
  5. Describe and follow federal standards for curation of artifacts;
  6. Comprehend major archaeological reports on recovered artifacts. 

Evaluation:

Grades are based on weekly hands-on exercises; quizzes; and tests that include both written and practicum components. 

Course Presentation:

Lecture and class discussions occupy approximately one-quarter of the class time, and hands-on experience with artifacts three-quarters of the class time. We will be working with artifacts recovered from sites in central South Carolina. 

Audience: Students who wish to pursue a job in archaeology and who have already taken ANTH 319 Principles of Archaeology. Prior knowledge of the basic vocabulary of archaeology is assumed. This fast-paced, hands-on course requires extra student time in the archaeological laboratory during weekdays to complete exercises and study for quizzes and tests.


 


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