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Coronavirus: Get complete details about the university's response to COVID-19.

Office of the Provost

Frequently Asked Questions

 Information for Faculty

Faculty will teach their courses remotely as directed by campus leadership. We are currently working with faculty as they adapt to their courses for remote delivery. These adaptations may result in changes to course requirements, assignments, and examinations. Information about assistance with making these changes is available under “Individual and Group Assistance” on Keep Teaching.

We expect that faculty will adapt their courses in a variety of ways. Faculty may choose asynchronous techniques, recording presentations for playback by students, creating interactive assignments, providing readings, asking for writing assignments, etc. Faculty can also choose a synchronous technique, for example, to hold a virtual class session during the regular class meeting time, using Blackboard Collaborate (supported by DoIT) or other tools the faculty member is accustomed to using.

Faculty who have never used remote teaching tools are encouraged to obtain assistance from the Center for Teaching Excellence or the Division of Information Technology.

We are asking all faculty members to communicate their expectations, and update their syllabi, to reflect the transition to remote delivery.

There are very few classes that cannot be taught remotely and faculty members are expected to make every effort to do so. Remote teaching might not be the best format for a particular course but we are in unusual circumstances and the best format might not be an option.

If a faculty member cannot determine how their specific course can be taught online, they should report the course and why it cannot be taught in a remote format to their Chair and Dean.

Tips and other resources for students are available under “Resources to Share with Students” on the Keep Teaching site.

 Faculty and advisors can submit names of students who do not have the technology to do remote learning by completing the technology needs form on the Keep Teaching website. The Provost’s Office will be arranging support.
Students who are not on campus will not have access to the library, and some will lack access to their course textbooks. If you can, substitute materials that freely available online.

Contact the library for assistance with Course Materials Support including scans or links in Blackboard to articles, textbooks, ebooks, streaming video, book chapters, and open educational resources. Some textbook publishers have eased access to digital materials, including Pearson and Cambridge.

 The Student Success Center will be going virtual for both tutoring and supplemental instruction. See the drop down for academic support on the Covid-19: Campus Access and Student Resources page.
Students must be registered with the Student Disability Resource Center (SDRC) to receive accommodations. The SDRC will contact faculty who have students registered with disabilities to help make sure the online course is accessible. The SDRC will also provide one of their counselors as a teaching assistant for classes with heavy accessibility needs.

In general, the academic integrity expectations of in-person learning transfers to remotely delivered content. See the resources on Keep Teaching, including Addressing Academic Dishonesty in the Online Classroom [pdf] and Online Assessment Best Practices for Faculty. [pdf]

Faculty are encouraged to move high-stakes tests that would require proctoring to outside of the remote teaching period (which currently ends on April 5) or develop alternative ways of evaluation (e.g., papers, take-home exams, quizzes or exams through Blackboard that do not need proctoring, etc.) for use during the remote teaching period. The University is looking into test proctoring options should the remote teaching period be extended.

Faculty may allow students to take an Incomplete and help the student complete the course in the coming months. An Incomplete does not incur a charge for taking the course again, but students must complete the course within one year.
No.
No. Doing so would be a violation of University Policies and of SACSCOC standards. Instructional time must be 700 minutes per credit hour. Time will have to be made up for any class cancellations.

A faculty member cannot independently assign a Pass/Fail grade rather than a letter grade for a student.

An undergraduate student may request the Pass/Fail option of this form [pdf] which then must be approved by the advisor and academic Dean and they may request this up to the W date of a term (which has been extended to 4/6/202 for the full spring semester). Please note that the Pass-Fail option can only be used on free electives and not for the major, do not count towards the hours for President’s/Dean’s list (See grading policies), and a Pass grade is not calculated into the GPA. Because of these aspects of the Pass/Fail option, there are scholarship/fellowship implications and students considering this option should check with the Office of Student Financial Aid and Scholarship for details.

Graduate students normally must request the Pass/Fail option prior to registration. Because of the unusual circumstance, the Graduate School will approve requests up to the W date of a term (which has been extended to 4/6/202 for the full spring semester). However, note that the restrictions on Pass/Fail grading published in the Graduate Bulletin are applicable: the content must be outside the student’s major area or student and not on the program of study. In addition, many graduate courses only allow standard grading. Note that a pass/fail grade should reflect that the student must have a grade of C or higher for graduate credit.

 Yes, the time will have to be made up for any class cancellations which at this point is one week of classes..
It is past the tuition refund deadlines for this full term. We do not anticipate tuition and fees to be refunded at this time due to continuity of academic programs. Study Abroad programs that have not started and are cancelled with be handled separately.
Yes, as a result of class cancellations this semester, the following changes have been made to the academic calendar:
  • Part of Term 30 (Standard Part of Term; Full Semester): Last day to withdraw with grade of ‘W’ has been changed to April 6, 2020.
  • Part of Terms 3B (Spring II), 3A2, 3B0, 3B1, 3B2, 3B3, 3BA: Refund and course withdrawal dates have been adjusted using a start date on or after March 23, 2020.

All part of term refund and course withdrawal dates can be found at: Codes Part of Terms. Please note that course end dates have not changed, and that students are responsible for all course requirements for the semester.

 Downloadable FAQs for Faculty [pdf]


 Information for Students

Classes may be cancelled or moved to remote teaching. Class cancellations and remote teaching plans will be announced on the university homepage. Faculty teaching remotely will adapt their courses for this type of remote delivery. These adaptations may result in changes to course requirements, assignments, and examinations. If you have any questions about a specific course, please contact your instructor.

We expect that faculty will adapt their courses in a variety of ways. Faculty may choose asynchronous techniques, recording presentations for playback by students, creating interactive assignments, providing readings, asking for writing assignments, etc. Faculty can also choose a synchronous technique, for example, to hold a virtual class session during the regular class meeting time, using Blackboard Collaborate (supported by DoIT) or other tools the faculty member is accustomed to using.

We are asking all faculty members to communicate their expectations, and update their syllabi, to reflect the transition to remote delivery.

 Contact your instructor immediately. The Provost’s Office will be arranging support.
The course may continue to meet during the scheduled time… or may be structured for asynchronous delivery, i.e., so that you may access it at your convenience. Faculty will determine how their courses will be taught remotely and let you know the format and expectations of the remote teaching. If you have any questions about a specific course, please contact your instructor.

We are asking faculty to post chapters as needed on Blackboard or find alternative open educational resources for students to access. Students who are within a reasonable distance of the university are encouraged to get their notes and books from their Columbia residence. Students are allowed to enter residence halls to collect their belongings needed for class.

Some textbook publishers have eased access to digital materials, including Pearson and Cambridge.

Faculty are working to determine how courses can be meaningfully completed remotely. Should there be components of the class that simply cannot be done this way, we are working on alternate arrangements. For questions about specific courses, you should contact the instructor of the course.
Yes, the time will have to be made up for any class cancellations.
The Student Success Center will be going virtual for both tutoring and supplemental instruction. See the drop down for academic support on the COVID-19: Campus Access and Student Resources page.
 For questions related to any specific course, please contact the course instructor.
In general, the academic integrity expectations of in-person learning transfers to remotely delivered content. Please be sure to follow your faculty members’ expectations regarding academic honesty, testing, reposting online course content, or recording course materials.
For technical help with Blackboard, contact the DoIT Service Desk (or at 803-777-1800).
Yes, the Student Disability Resource Center (SDRC) will be available to ensure that students with accommodations are able to engage with their courses and related assignments and are being proactive in reaching out to faculty. If you need accommodations, register with the SDRC to receive accommodations. The SDRC will contact faculty who have students registered with disabilities to help make sure the remotely delivered course is accessible.
On-campus experiences like these will be transitioned to a remote format; work with your independent study instructor to develop plans. Lab-based independent studies may transition to literature reviews, data analysis, or other options that can be completed at a distance. 

We are committed to ensuring you can complete the semester and fulfill your academic requirements.

 

Tips and other resources for students are available under “Resources to Share with Students” on the Keep Teaching site.

 
Some study abroad/away programs have been closed because of local health and security concerns. The Study Abroad Office provides specific guidance. 
Faculty may allow students to take an Incomplete and help the student complete the course in the coming months. An Incomplete does not incur a charge for taking the course again, but students must complete the course within one year. Contact your instructor if you are interested in doing so. 
No. 

An undergraduate student may request the Pass/Fail option of this form [pdf] which then must be approved by the advisor and academic Dean and they may request this up to the W date of a term (which has been extended to 4/6/202 for the full spring semester). Please note that the Pass-Fail option can only be used on free electives and not for the major, do not count towards the hours for President’s/Dean’s list (See grading policies), and a Pass grade is not calculated into the GPA. Because of these aspects of the Pass/Fail option, there are scholarship/fellowship implications and students considering this option should check with the Office of Student Financial Aid and Scholarship for details. Check with the Office of Student Financial Aid and Scholarships before making a decision. 

Graduate students normally must request the Pass/Fail option prior to registration. Because of the unusual circumstance, the Graduate School will approve requests up to the W date of a term (which has been extended to 4/6/202 for the full spring semester). However, note that the restrictions on Pass/Fail grading published in the Graduate Bulletin are applicable: the content must be outside the student’s major area or student and not on the program of study. In addition, many graduate courses only allow standard grading. Note that a pass/fail grade should reflect that the student must have a grade of C or higher for graduate credit.

It is past the tuition refunds deadline for this full term. We do not anticipate tuition and fees to be refunded at this time due to continuity of academic programs.
We will send additional guidance to faculty and students about the final examination processes should the remote teaching period extend into Finals Week. 
Your academic advisor will be reaching out to you to advise remotely. 
We do not expect that registration for summer or fall courses will be affected at this time. 

 Downloadable FAQs for Students [pdf]


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