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National Resource Center for The First-Year Experience and Students in Transition


Featured Events

 

 

Featured Conference Sessions

Christina Hardin, Editor, E-Source for College Transitions, National Resource Center for The First-Year Experience and Students in Transition

Jenny Lee, Instructor of Academic and Professional Skills, Florida Polytechnic University 

Assessment to ensure student learning is taking place is a critical part of an FYE Program. Adhering to data-driven, student-centered assessment practices is crucial in developing, redefining, and implementing a program of study for first-year students. This session will include a discussion of developmental theories in learning and assessment, and will include an interactive participant review of example student data collection and evaluation practices. Participants will leave this session equipped to evaluate their own FYE assessment plans, programs, courses, and co-curricular activities to ensure they are meeting the needs of their unique and changing first year students. 

Catherine Andersen, Vice Provost, University of Baltimore

Fiona Glade, Assistant Provost Undergraduate Education and Executive Director of the Center for Learning, Teaching and Technnology, University of Baltimore

Carey Miller, Director First-Year Experience, University of Baltimore

Michael Jones, First-Year Advisor, University of Baltimore

 

Regardless of the size, type or geographic location of an institution of higher education, or whether a students in a first-time freshman or  transfer student, one measure ofeffectiveness is the percentage of students who begin and subsequently graduate. When one understands the unique input variables students bring to an institution and understand and track their specific paths, intervention plans based on sound assessment data that lead to real improvements, can be developed. This session will review the most current student retention data, and address the multitude of variables that become barriers for student success and identify and design interventions along students’ unique paths to graduation.  In addition, participants will do a SWOT (Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats) for their own institutions and develop a preliminary action plan, using the first-year as the catalyst,  to address their institutions’ retention issues.

Wayne Jackson, Director of Multicultural Academic and Support Services, University of Central Florida

Tony Davis, Counselor,  Montgomery County Community College

 

This session will address the trends of retention and graduation of multicultural male students at colleges and universities across the country. We will investigate why rates are so low and what can be done in order to stem the tide of males not graduating with their degree.

This session will also provide participants the opportunity to begin the work of designing new programs and initiatives to address the retention and persistence of African American and Hispanic males on their campus. This session will particularly benefit those who are interested in implementing or improving the retention and graduation rate of multicultural males.

Michele Campagna, Assistant Dean, Learning Initiatives & Succes, Westchester Community College

Joe Cueso, Professor Emeritus, Marymount College

 

FYE programs can play a pivotal role in implementing Guided Pathways models at 2-year and 4-year institutions. FYE's emphasis on proactive, intrusive, holistic support that integrates curricular and co-curricular programs (e.g., academic advising and career counseling) aligns nicely with the four pillars of the Pathway's model: clarifying pathways for students, helping students choose a pathway, enabling students to stay on a pathway, and ensuring student learning. This workshop will demonstrate how FYE programming can support the goals of Guided Pathways to create a synergistic effect on student success. Participants will be equipped with an implementation plan and supporting resources.

Kate Otto, David Lemmons, Sherry Larson-Rhodes