Recent Stories

Stopping a silent killer

Stopping a silent killer

Amber Williams has painful, personal experience with carbon monoxide poisoning -- she lost her 11-year-old nephew and nearly lost her sister-in-law in a deadly incident two years ago. And that's why she's made it her mission to make people more aware of the danger.

Landing hard, burning bright

Landing hard, burning bright

Alumna and Hollywood stuntwoman Jennifer Mobley, known professionally as Jasi Lanier, makes her living as a human projectile, punching bag and blowtorch -- and she loves every minute of it.

Students show off research at Discovery Day

Students show off research at Discovery Day

Pharmacy students Alexas Polk and Sarah DeMott researched nearly 5,000 medical orders given on television medical shows since 1989 (Doogie Howser, M.D.). What they found was that fictional TV doctors were wrong about 12 percent of the time. They will present their findings at Discovery Day.

Dwindling bird populations in Fukushima

Dwindling bird populations in Fukushima

Several recent papers from biologist Tim Mousseau and colleagues show that the avian situation in areas contaminated by radioactive materials released during Japan's Fukushima-Daiichi nuclear disaster is just getting worse.

Alumni, students 'collide' on stage

Alumni, students 'collide' on stage

Caitlin McCormack came to the University of South Carolina to make her dance dreams come true. This week she'll return to the stage with a group of students and alumni to perform an original piece.

Climate connections

Climate connections

Over the past million years, global climate has undergone periods of stability, but also instability, with abrupt, rapid, and substantial climate changes occurring as a consequence of natural processes that scientists are actively working to understand. University of South Carolina paleoceanographer Kelly Gibson and colleagues contributed to this effort in a recent paper.

The road less traveled

The road less traveled

Kassandra Solsrud is taking the academic road less traveled in her quest to earn a degree in international business enroute to medical school. Then again, the sophomore from Atlanta, Ga., hasn't exactly set her sights on a traditional career in medicine.

Raising the bar

Raising the bar

Alumnus, attorney and University of South Carolina board member William Hubbard is serving a one-year term as president of the American Bar Association and making the most of the opportunity.

The face of feminism

The face of feminism

One of the first things Clarie Randall has to combat as part of the Feminist Collective is the negative impression that tends to follow the word feminism.

Capturing life at Gitmo

Capturing life at Gitmo

The U.S. naval base at Guantanamo Bay has had some seriously bad press over the past dozen years as the detention center for people deemed enemy combatants following the 2001 terrorist attacks. But the base was there for a century before that and was home to thousands of service members, their families and civilian contractors from both the U.S. and other countries.

Haley, Scott, Staley to address graduates

Haley, Scott, Staley to address graduates

Gov. Nikki Haley, U.S. Sen. Tim Scott, and Gamecocks Women's Basketball Coach Dawn Staley will deliver the commencement addresses at the May 8-9 ceremonies at the University of South Carolina.

Graduate students get involved

Graduate students get involved

Balancing family, work and studies is a challenge most graduate students face, but the Graduate Student Association wants to add one more thing -- getting involved on campus.

Finding the right career chemistry

Finding the right career chemistry

Lindsay Sexton began her undergraduate career at the University of South Carolina with plans to attend medical school after graduation. It was not until a professor asked Sexton to help with research and development that she realized she could pursue a career path in chemistry.

Toward a more perfect student union

Toward a more perfect student union

After nine months waiting for a new home, the Leadership and Service Center recently returned to the Russell House -- and the return after a displacement by construction work wasn't just a move back, it was a move up.

Honoring a son

Honoring a son

"If you had to write down the specifications of what you'd expect of a son, he would come as close to meeting them as anyone could," says Jim Pearce, a 1942 Carolina graduate who endowed a UofSC professorship to memorialize his son Mac, a 1972 Carolina grad. "I like the fact that this professorship will continue to honor Mac for generations to come."

Bajo's intention

Bajo's intention

David Bajo's latest novel, "Mercy 6," is a literary take on a medical thriller set in a California hospital -- "I tried to address the tropes of the genre and invert them rather than falling into them," says Carolina's creative writing MFA director -- but that's only one aspect of what Bajo intends to discuss April 18 at the Open Book series.

Art studio alum sees his doodler's dreams come true

Art studio alum sees his doodler's dreams come true

Sam Spina has always wanted to make a living out of his doodles. Now, thanks to an opportunity to make a short cartoon for Nickelodeon, he works everyday as a storyboard artist on Cartoon Network's "The Regular Show."

ACE of Coker basement

ACE of Coker basement

The high-tech teaching facility in the basement of the Coker Life Sciences building -- the ACE lab -- doesn't involve novice cardsharps learning the latest in sleight-of-hand. There's a much more serious kind of training going on in the South Carolina College of Pharmacy's Aseptic Compounding Experience laboratory.

Passion for programming

Passion for programming

CS First, created by a Google team in South Carolina, is a curriculum geared for children in grades 4 through 8 that’s organized around themes such as art or game design and includes easy-to-use programming software called Scratch. JameSue Goodman, the project lead, is a 1997 Carolina grad who took her first computer science course in her last semester of college.

5 questions for the maestro

5 questions for the maestro

Maestro Donald Portnoy answers a few questions about his conducting career. Portnoy is a 2015 Elizabeth O'Neill Verner Award recipient.

Outstanding Woman of the Year: Jacquline Plyler

Outstanding Woman of the Year: Jacquline Plyler

Jacquline Plyler has always had an affinity for animals, her mother says, even though she was once kicked while trying to vaccinate a cow. Now the biomedical engineering senior wants to make a career out of studying and creating vaccines for farm animals. "I didn't decide to pre-vet until between my freshman and sophomore year," says Plyler, who was honored this week as the university's Outstanding Woman of the Year.

Building a path beyond the classroom

Building a path beyond the classroom

Elizabeth Moore has always been interested in science and math. Health care was something she was naturally drawn to but watching her grandmother struggle with Alzheimer's Disease sparked a passion for research that the University of South Carolina junior hopes to pursue in her career.

A business built on sweat

A business built on sweat

You could say that Jamie Scott has built his business on sweat -- his own and his customers'. But there's a lot more to Jamie Scott Fitness than perspiration, and that's why the former Gamecock football player has been so successful with his boutique-style gym in Columbia.

Carolinians on the Run

Carolinians on the Run

Social work alumna Mary Lohman directs Girls on the Run Columbia, a nonprofit that develops self-esteem and other positive attributes in young girls while training them to run a 5k. Social work assistant professor Aidyn Iachini is conducting research that's helping making the program even better.