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School of Music


Degree Programs

Graduate Handbook

The Graduate Handbook is a reference guide for School of Music students. All pages on the School of Music website should refer to the material on this page for procedures and requirements. In the event there is conflicting information on the School of Music website, consider this page to be the up-to-date and correct version; it is kept updated by the executive associate dean for graduate studies, Dr. Andrew Gowan. Please direct questions or comments to him at agowan@mozart.sc.edu.

Contents

  1. GRADUATE MUSIC PROGRAMS AND AREAS OF STUDY
  2. APPLICATION PROCEDURES
  3. AUDITION REQUIREMENTS
  4. GRADUATE MUSIC DIAGNOSTIC EXAMINATION
  5. CERTIFICATE OF GRADUATE STUDY IN MUSIC PERFORMANCE
  6. MASTER’S DEGREES
  7. DOCTORAL DEGREES
  8. OTHER INFORMATION FOR STUDENTS
  9. INFORMATION FOR FACULTY

Graduate Music Programs and Areas of Study


The School of Music offers the Certificate of Graduate Study in Music Performance; the Master of Music degree in composition, conducting, jazz studies, music history, music theory, opera theater, performance, and piano pedagogy; the Master of Music Education degree; the Doctor of Musical Arts degree in composition, conducting, performance (selected areas), and piano pedagogy; and the Doctor of Philosophy degree in music education. The Master of Arts in Teaching and the Education Specialist in Teaching degrees are offered in conjunction with the College of Education. The Certificate of Graduate Study and all master’s programs are available to applicants who have developed skills or knowledge in the major area beyond that expected of a typical undergraduate student. The Doctor of Musical Arts degree, appropriate for those who desire to teach at the college level, is available to applicants who evidence not only exceptional abilities in the major area but well-developed musical intelligence and on-going scholarly interest as well. The Doctor of Philosophy degree in music education is a research-oriented program, and applicants are expected to demonstrate a record of successful teaching experience in elementary or secondary schools, to offer evidence of academic excellence and on-going scholarly inquiry, and to demonstrate the ability to conduct independent research. All master’s and doctoral programs require a comprehensive, functional knowledge of music history, music literature, and music theory. Additional information is available from:

Music Graduate Admissions
School of Music
University of South Carolina
Columbia, SC 29208
(803) 777-4106
FAX: (803) 777-6508x
(E-Mail: gradmusic@mozart.sc.edu)

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Graduate Application Procedures

Applicants must hold a bachelor's degree in music or music education (or the equivalent) in order to meet minimum admission requirements for the certificate program or for a master's degree, and a master's degree in music or music education (or the equivalent) in order to meet minimum admission requirements for a doctoral degree. Additional prerequisites are listed under individual Degree Programs.

The following application materials are required:

  1. Graduate School application form and fee (electronic application: www.gradschool.sc.edu)
  2. One official copy of a transcript from each previous college or university attended
  3. Three recommendations written on the forms provided by the School of Music (available on-line at www.music.sc.edu/AP/Grad/apps.html); one of the recommendations should be completed by the applicant's most recent major professor and/or employer
  4. If born after 1956, proof of immunization against measles (Rubeola) and German measles (Rubella); this may be provided any time before initial enrollment
  5. For a master's or doctoral degree, an acceptable score on either the general (verbal/quantitative/analytical) portion of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) or the Miller Analogy Test (MAT) AND All applicants (certificate, master's, doctoral) whose native language is not English and who have not completed an undergraduate degree at an English-speaking institution, must achieve an acceptable score on either the TOEFL or the Cambridge IELTS Academic Course Type 2 Examination, as given below. In addition, the acceptable minimum scores on the USC English Placement Exam (written and oral sections, taken before initial enrollment) are expected.

    Degree

    TOEFL

    (paper/internet)

    Cambridge

    (IELTS)

    USC Exam Oral

    USC Exam Writing

    Certificate  520/68  5.5    
    MM in Composition, Conducting, Jazz Studies, Opera Theater, Performance  570/80  6.5  5  5+
    MM in Music History, Music Theory, Piano Pedagogy  570/80  6.5  5  5+
    MME  570/80  6.5  5  5+
    DMA in Composition, Conducting, Performance  600/100  7.0  5  5+
    DMA in Piano Pedagogy  600/100  7.0  5+  5+
    PhD in Music Education  600/100  7.0  5+  5+
  6. International students must complete the VISA Information Form. A onetime registration fee charged by the Office of International Students must be paid before initial enrollment; information about this fee is available from that office (www.sa.sc.edu/ips/ips.htm).
  7. Reservation form for the Graduate Music Diagnostic Examination may be found at www.music.sc.edu/AP/Grad/apps.html)
  8. Typed summary (e.g., résumé or "c.v.") of educational and professional experience, with dates and names of teachers and employers
  9. For doctoral applicants, forms for doctoral residency and doctoral studies statement (www.music.sc.edu/AP/Grad/apps.html).
  10. The individual materials according to the desired program (see specific requirements by program section below)

All applications, including auditions, should have been completed by the indicated deadline (please allow sufficient time for transcripts, exam scores, and recommendations to be prepared by the originator and sent to the School of Music):

Semester of Initial Enrollment and it's Application Deadline

  • Fall (late August) June 15 (May 1 for international students)
  • Spring (January) November 1 (September 1 for international students)
  • Summer (June/July) April 15 (March 1 for international students)

An applicant desiring to be considered for a graduate assistantship should complete the application process by March 1.

An applicant may be fully admitted to a graduate program, admitted to a graduate program with conditions admitted on probation, or declined admission. Students admitted with conditions or on probation are expected to complete all required courses and remove all deficiencies. The Graduate Music Diagnostic Examination must be taken before initial enrollment.

Supporting materials (recordings, papers, compositions, etc.) cannot be returned unless a stamped envelope is provided.


Specific Requirements by Program

Master of Music, concentration in Composition

a. Two or three compositions that display an understanding of different media; if possible, include complete recordings (CD or DVD preferred; MIDI realizations discouraged)
b. Complete list of compositions that includes the following information: date of composition, duration, instrumentation, and list of all performances
c. A writing sample in the form of a term paper or published article
d. A brief (1-2 page) essay outlining goals, ambitions, and interests as a composer as well as goals for graduate study at USC
e. Applicants who do not have a bachelor's degree in music must take the Music Diagnostic Examination before the application can be considered


Master of Music, concentration in Conducting

a. Typed repertory list of works publicly conducted as well as copies of representative programs
b. On-campus audition (if distance to the campus is a factor, an applicant may submit a video recording for provisional admittance; the applicant will need to complete an on-campus audition, however, before initial registration)
c. Keyboard skills for applicants in choral conducting


Master of Music, concentration in Jazz Studies

a.  Typed list of jazz performances
b.  On-campus audition (if distance to the campus is a factor, an applicant may submit an audition recording for provisional admittance; the applicant will need to complete an on-campus audition, however, before initial registration)
c.  For jazz composition, several compositions that display an understanding of different jazz idioms (if possible, include recordings)
d.  Keyboard skills 


Master of Music, concentration in Music History

a.  Submission of at least two college-level term papers in music
b.  Results of the Graduate Music Diagnostic Examination
c.  Keyboard skills 


Master of Music, concentration in Opera Theater

a.  For opera performance: admission into the Master of Music degree in voice performance (see items 'a' and 'b' under 'Master of Music in Performance'); note: The three required letters of recommendation should address qualifications for admission to both the voice-performance and opera-theater programs
b.  For opera stage directing: audition before the voice faculty (see items 'a' and 'b' under 'Master of Music in Performance')
c.  A typed summary of previous musical/theatrical study and experience as well as previous professional performing experience
d.  On-campus audition:

1) For singers, two contrasting arias or solo scenes, one of which may be staged
2) For stage directors, an analytical presentation of an opera for production that includes information on the composer and librettist, with period and historical references, character analysis, set and costume concepts, and comments on the musical style; presentation of an impromptu movement audition


Master of Music in Performance

a.  Typed repertory list (with works publicly performed clearly identified) and copies of recital programs
b.  On-campus audition (if distance to the campus is a factor, an applicant may submit an audition recording for provisional admittance; the applicant will need to complete an on-campus audition, however, before initial registration); voice majors must also demonstrate diction proficiency in English, French, German, and Italian as well as document the successful completion of two years of college-level study in one of the three foreign languages.


Master of Music, concentration in Piano Pedagogy

a.  Typed repertory list (with works publicly performed clearly identified) and copies of recital programs
b.  On-campus audition (if distance to the campus is a factor, an applicant may submit an audition recording for provisional admittance; the applicant will need to complete an on-campus audition, however, before initial registration)
c.  Thesis track: submission of at least two college-level term papers in music or music education


Master of Arts in Teaching

a.  An on-campus interview, which is scheduled after all admission materials have been received by the Graduate School and the School of Music. Contact the School of Music graduate studies program coordinator to confirm that all application materials are on file prior to contacting the music education coordinator to schedule an on-campus interview.
b.  Submission of a 5-10 minute video-recorded audition on primary instrument or voice. The recording must have been made within the last five years, and the repertoire included should be identified.
c.  One college-level term paper with title page and references


Master of Music Education

a.  Documentation of appropriate education and teacher certification
b.  On-campus interview, to be scheduled after all supporting materials are on file 
c.  Submission of one college-level term paper with title page and references regarding some aspect of music or music education. Thesis track applicants should submit two college-level term papers with title page and references regarding some aspect of music or music education.
d.  Recital track: submission of a typed repertory list (with works publicly performed clearly identified) and copies of recital programs; vocalists must demonstrate diction proficiency in French, German, and Italian before acceptance into the recital track
e.  15-minute video of prospective student teaching elementary, middle school, or high school music class or ensemble.

 


Doctor of Musical Arts in Composition

a.  Three or four compositions that display an understanding of different media; if possible, include complete recordings (CD or DVD preferred; MIDI realizations discouraged)
b.  Complete list of compositions that includes the following information: date of composition, duration, instrumentation, and list of all performances
c.  A sample of writing in the form of a published article or term paper
d.  The required Doctoral Statement should include your goals, ambitions, and interests as a composer as well as what you hope to accomplish while at USC


Doctor of Musical Arts in Conducting

a.  Typed repertory list of works publicly conducted as well as copies of representative programs
b.  Video recording for initial screening; on-campus audition and interview (by invitation; wind conducting applicants must have video in by Jan. 15) for acceptance; applicants in choral conducting must also demonstrate diction proficiencies detailed under degree prerequisites
c.  Evidence of at least two years of successful teaching or professional experience (applicants of exceptional ability who do not have prerequisite experience may be admitted on the condition that such experience be completed before the final degree recital is presented)
d.  Submission of at least two graduate-level term papers


Doctor of Musical Arts in Performance

a.  Typed repertory list (with works publicly performed clearly identified) and copies of recital programs
b.  On-campus audition (if distance to the campus is a factor, a student may submit an audition recording for provisional admittance; the student will need to complete an on-campus audition, however, before initial registration)
c.  Evidence of at least two years of successful teaching or professional experience (applicants of exceptional ability who do not have prerequisite experience may be admitted on the condition that such experience be completed before the final degree recital is presented)
d.  Submission of at least two graduate-level term papers
e.  For voice majors, demonstration of diction proficiency in English, French, German, and Italian (see under degree prerequisites)


Doctor of Musical Arts in Piano Pedagogy

a.  Typed repertory list (with works publicly performed clearly identified) and copies of recital programs
b.  On-campus audition (if distance to the campus is a factor, a student may submit an audition recording for provisional admittance; the student will need to complete an on-campus audition, however, before initial registration)
c.  Evidence of at least two years of successful teaching or professional experience (applicants of exceptional ability who do not have prerequisite experience may be admitted on the condition that such experience be completed before the Oral Dissertation Examination)
d.  Recital/Treatise track: submission of at least two graduate-level term papers
e.  Dissertation track: submission of a master?s thesis or equivalent demonstration of the ability to undertake and complete significant, original scholarly work


Doctor of Philosophy in Music Education

a.  Documentation of appropriate education, certification and teaching experience. (Minimum of three years and expectation of five years successful teaching experience).
b.  On-campus interview, to be scheduled after submission of all supporting materials.
c.  Two college-level term papers with title page and references
d.  30-minute video of prospective student teaching elementary, middle school, or high school music class or ensemble.


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Graduate Audition Requirements

All applicants for graduate music programs requiring applied studies are to complete an on-campus audition in the major area as part of the application process. The audition will normally take no more than 20 minutes, with the audition committee selecting portions of the applicant’s audition repertory. If distance to the campus is a factor, an applicant may submit an audition recording for provisional admittance, but the on-campus audition must be completed before initial enrollment, normally on the second day of the Graduate Music Diagnostic Examinations. Students may submit audio CD recordings of good quality. Video recordings may be in DVD or U.S.-standard VHS tape format. Each audio or video box should contain the name, address, and performance area of the applicant as well as a list of compositions performed and the date of the recording. Recordings cannot be returned by mail unless return postage is provided. An applicant should submit to the University all necessary application materials (including a repertory list and copies of recital programs) at least two weeks before the audition date. It is especially important that the audition form included with the application packet be completed and returned to the School of Music before the audition. When necessary, an accompanist will be provided for voice auditions. Priority for graduate assistantships will be given to those who have auditioned by March 1.  The audition form may be downloaded here.

CONDUCTING

Master's applicants: At least three works (or movements of works) of varied style and mood.

Doctoral applicants: Preliminary audition (video recording due by Feb 15) should include at least three major works (or movements of works) of varied style and mood recorded in a rehearsal or live performance (preferably with the camera facing the conductor). NOTE: Wind conducting candidates must submit recordings by JANUARY 15. Final audition (by invitation) - On-campus; repertory to be determined.


GUITAR

At least four compositions from different style periods (Renaissance, Baroque, Classical, Romantic, Contemporary) that demonstrate tone, technique, and musical proficiency. Considerable flexibility will be permitted in the choice of literature when stylistic areas seem to overlap. The following may serve as a guide:

  • A work by J.S. Bach
  • A sonata (or movement of a sonata) or a set of variations
  • A major 20th century work
  • One composition of the applicant?s choice

Except for an avant-garde works, all compositions should be performed from memory.


JAZZ PERFORMANCE

Play and improvise in at least three different jazz idioms (Swing, BeBop, Cool, Fusion, etc.) and perform one work from the "classical" repertory.


ORGAN

  • One major work by J.S. Bach (such as a Prelude and Fugue or a trio sonata)
  • One work each from the 19th and 20th centuries
  • One work of the applicant?s choice

OPERA PERFORMANCE

By invitation only after admission to the MM-voice program, on-campus audition consisting of two contrasting arias or solo scenes, one of which should be staged.


OPERA STAGE DIRECTING

By invitation only, an analytical presentation of an opera for production that includes information on the composer and librettist, with period and historical references, character analysis, set and costume concepts, and comments on the musical style; presentation of an impromptu movement audition.


PERCUSSION

Prospective Students must audition in ALL THREE areas listed below to be considered for admission into the percussion program. The lists below contain suggested repertoire, but the student is not limited to this material. Other solos or etudes that show a similar level of technical and musical achievement may also be used for auditions.

Snare Drum:
One concert-style solo from one of the following books:

  • Twelve Studies for Snare Drum by Jaques Delecluse
  • Advanced Studies for Snare Drum by Mitchell Peters,
  • Advanced Etudes for Snare Drum by Keith Aleo.
In addition, prospective graduate students should also choose two excepts from the standard orchestral repertoire. These may include, but are not limited to:
  • Scheherazade (Mvt. III and IV) by Rimsky-Korsakov
  • Lt. Kije Suite by Prokofiev
  • Symphony #10 by Shostakovich.

Keyboard Percussion:
One four-mallet work for marimba. Appropriate selections would include, but are not limited to:

  • Two Mexican Dances by Gordon Stout
  • Two Movements for Marimba by Toshimitsu Tanaka
  • Virgina Tate by Paul Smadbeck
  • Caritas by Michael Burritt
In addition, prospective graduate students should also choose two excerpts from the standard orchestra repertoire. These may include, but are not limited to:
  • Porgy and Bess by Gershwin
  • Overture to Colas Breugnon by Kabalevsky
  • Polka from the Golden Age Ballet by Shostakovich

Timpani:
One appropriate solo or etude. Selections may include but are not limited to:

  • Eight Pieces for Timpani by Elliott Carter
  • Raga # 1 by William Cahn

In addition, prospective graduate students should also choose one excerpt from the orchestral repertoire of Beethoven or Tchaikovsky.


PIANO AND PIANO PEDAGOGY

Applicants for MM degrees should prepare a program 30 minutes in length; for DMA degrees, 45 minutes is needed. The audition program should feature works in contrasting styles from the standard literature. Except for avant-garde works, all compositions should be performed from memory.


STRINGS

At least four compositions from different style periods (Baroque, Classical, Romantic, 20th century) that demonstrate musical maturity and technique:

  • One movement from a major concerto
  • A major sonata
  • A work (or movement of work) composed before 1750
  • One composition of the applicant?s choice

One of the works should be performed from memory, and one must be an unaccompanied work.


VOICE

  • One art song from each of the following periods: Baroque, Classical, Romantic, 20th century
  • One aria (from an oratorio or opera) sung in the original language
  • The following languages should be represented: English, French, German, Italian

Except for an avant-garde works, all compositions should be performed from memory.


WIND INSTRUMENTS

At least four significant compositions (or movements) of contrasting styles. The works should demonstrate a mature grasp of phrasing, tone, contemporary techniques, articulation, and general technique. Memorization is not required.



Graduate Music Diagnostic Examination

Prior to initial registration, all students desiring to pursue a graduate degree in music or music education (MM, MME, DMA, PhD) are required to take the Graduate Music Diagnostic Examination, which consists of the following:

  • music history - all applicants
  • music theory  - all applicants
  • music education - applicants for the MME or PhD degree
  • piano literature - applicants for the MM and DMA programs in piano performance or pedagogy
  • piano pedagogy - applicants for the MM and DMA programs in piano pedagogy
  • conducting skills  - MME applicants in choral or instrumental music
  • diction skills - MM and MME applicants in voice or choral conducting
  • keyboard skills  - applicants in choral conducting, composition, jazz studies, music history, elementary music education, or choral music education

The music history portion consists of at least one essay, an aural styles examination, and objective questions that deal with terms, names, dates, general music bibliography, and major works of all Western music literature from the Middle Ages to the present. The latest editions of the following books are suggested as basic study materials: Grout/Palisca, A History of Western Music; Miller, History of Music; The New Harvard Dictionary of Music. You may also download the music history review guide. The music theory portion of the examination tests aural skills (melodic, two-part, and harmonic dictation as well as harmonic recognition and sight-singing) and basic theoretical knowledge (acoustics, analysis, part-writing, instrumental transposition, counterpoint, form, orchestration, terminology). Standard college textbooks in the indicated areas may be used as basic review materials. You may also download the music theory review guideMusic education majors will be given a written examination that tests pedagogical knowledge of elementary or secondary music teaching (general pedagogy, methods, materials, literature), and those specializing in choral or instrumental music must demonstrate proficiency in conducting. The piano literature portion of the exam will test knowledge of the standard body of piano performance literature.

Students are advised to prepare carefully for all portions of the examination, since the results are used to determine not only their admission status but also whether they will be required to take certain courses. Any student who changes areas after admission to a particular graduate degree program will be required to complete parts of the Diagnostic Examination applicable to the new area. All requirements resulting from the examination must be completed as stipulated by the School of Music. The Graduate Music Diagnostic Examination is normally offered a few days before the beginning of fall, spring, and summer I terms. Click here to see the specific dates and download the application form.



Certificate of Graduate Study in Music Performance

The Certificate of Graduate Study in Music Performance requires the successful completion of an approved program of study that provides a minimum of eighteen (18) semester hours of graduate study. At least one-half of the total credit hours must be in courses numbered 700 or above, exclusive of recital credit. The remaining hours may be taken from courses numbered 500 or above when registered as graduate credit. No credits may be transferred from another institution. A B average is required for all courses taken for graduate credit. No more than three hours of C credit may be applied toward the certificate, and six hours with grades of C+ or lower will render a student ineligible for further certificate study.  Students enrolled in the certificate program should submit a Program of Study to the Graduate School within the first twelve (12) months of enrollment.  A maximum of 24 graduate credits may be accumulated when a student has been admitted only into the certificate program. The program must be completed within two calendar years following admission. With the approval of the appropriate music faculty and the Music Graduate Director, a student will be allowed to transfer to either the Master of Music or Doctor of Musical Arts degree in performance if all admission requirements for the desired degree have been met in full. Except for recitals, all appropriate courses taken as part of the certificate program may be transferred to the desired degree.

The following outlines the minimum program for all Graduate Certificate students in music performance:

Applied studies (MUSC 711) 8-10 credits
Two Public Recitals 2 credits
Electives (approved by the area faculty and the Music Graduate Director) 6-8 credits
  18 credits total

Each student majoring in an orchestral or band instrument or in voice will be required to enroll in an approved ensemble (and in chamber music, where pertinent) each regular semester of attendance. A maximum of four credits of major ensemble or chamber ensemble (MUSC 734 and MUSC 735) may be counted as electives. 

Students pursuing the Certificate of Graduate Study in Music Performance or are required to present two full-length solo recitals of 50 to 65 minutes. The literature performed on each recital will be learned specifically for that performance. The recitals will be adjudicated by at least a three-member committee selected from the area faculty. Because some members of the recital committee may not be available, a student should first consult the Music Graduate Director before scheduling the recital for presentation during the summer months. A recital may not be presented unless the student has officially enrolled in recital credit. In order to receive applied lessons, a student must be enrolled for applied credit. 

At least four weeks before a recital is to be presented, the student should submit a typed recital prospectus to his or her major professor, who will see that it is signed by each member of the area faculty and submitted to the Music Graduate Office. Guidelines for preparing the proposal are available online or from the Music Studies Office.  All recitals (including those presented off campus) must be scheduled through the Music Office and should be presented when classes are officially in session. Procedures for scheduling a recital are available online.  Each graduate recital is to be recorded and a copy archived in the Music Library. 

With the approval of the area faculty and the Music Graduate Director, a student pursuing the Certificate of Graduate Study in Music Performance may substitute a chamber music or concerto recital or a major opera role for one of the required solo recitals. The literature performed should have been learned during the student?s study at USC. The following pertain: 

  • Opera Role (MUSC 793) - The approved role, which is to be presented and adjudicated in a public performance, must be considered a major (i.e., not supporting) role in an opera. With the approval of the Music Graduate Committee, the opera role may be presented outside the Columbia metropolitan area if the performance is video-recorded and at least one member of the area faculty is present. 
  • Concerto Recital (MUSC 794) - The work chosen for the concerto recital should come from the standard concerto repertory of the student?s performance medium. Public performance with an orchestra (or the appropriate original "accompanying" instrumentation) is required. With the permission of the Music Graduate Committee, the concerto recital may be presented outside the Columbia metropolitan area if the performance is video-recorded and at least one member of the area faculty is present. 
  • Chamber music Recital (MUSC 795) - The works should be chosen from the standard chamber music repertory of the student?s performance medium, though one recently composed work that may not have become a "standard" repertory item may be included. 

Students enrolled in the certificate program should prepare and submit a Program of Study proposal for approval by the academic advisor and the Music Graduate Director within the first twelve (12) months of matriculation.



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Master's Degrees

Course Requirements

Both the Master of Music and the Master of Music Education degrees require the successful completion of an approved program of study that provides a minimum of thirty-two (32) semester hours of graduate study. At least one half of the total credit hours must be in courses numbered 700 or above, exclusive of recital or thesis credit. The remaining hours may be taken from courses numbered 500 or above when registered as graduate credit.

Within the first twelve (12) months of matriculation, each student should prepare and submit a Program of Study proposal for approval by the academic advisor and the Music Graduate Director. The candidate must satisfactorily complete all courses and studies required by the School of Music. An average grade of B (3.0) is required for all courses taken in the major program, and a grade point average of not less than B for all graduate work is required for graduation. In addition, an accumulation of grades of C+ or below on 12 credits of graduate course work taken at the University within a six-year period will disqualify a student for a master's degree (see the University Graduate Studies Bulletin for further information).  No more than six hours of workshop credit (PD courses) may be applied toward any master's degree, and no more than three credits of ensemble and chamber music (MUSC 734 and 735) may be counted as electives.  For students matriculating after May 2010, MUSC 523-Techniques and Materials for Tonal Music (3) may not be used for degree credit.  For further information about academic regulations see the Graduate Studies Bulletin.


Master of Music in Composition

Music Bibliography and Research (MUSC 707) 2 credits
Major Area
a) Composition study (8-9 credits of MUSC 716) [1]
b) Thesis composition (3 credits of MUSC 799)[2]
11-12 credits
Music History (as determined by the Music Diagnostic Exam) 3 credits
Music Theory (as determined by the Music Diagnostic Exam) 3 credits
Music Technology [3] 3 credits
Music Electives [4] 9-10 credits
Total 32 credits

MM-composition students must submit to the composition faculty an annual composition portfolio and attend a weekly Composition Seminar (no credit) while enrolled in MUSC 716 during the academic year. In addition, composition students are expected to attend master classes, lectures, and performances sponsored by the composition faculty. Normally the degree is completed within two years; in extenuating circumstances, however, the composition faculty may allow a third year of degree work.

[1]Three, 3-credit semesters of MUSC 716 (private composition study) are required. With the permission of the composition faculty, students may replace one semester of MUSC 716 with two summer terms of study (1 credit each term) and one elective credit. Students are encouraged to study with different teachers during their degree work.

[2]The thesis for the Master of Music Composition degree must be a chamber work at least 15 minutes in length. (A work for large ensemble may be substituted provided its duration is at least 15 minutes.) A composition prospectus, describing the instrumentation, general scope and resources of the work must be approved by the thesis committee before the student enrolls in MUSC 799 or begins composition of the work.

[3]Music Technology courses to be chosen in consultation with the student?s advisor after a review of the results of the Music Diagnostic Examination.

[4]Electives to be chosen from advanced courses in music composition (not including MUSC 716 or MUSC 799), music theory, music history, performance, and music technology, depending upon the background, interests, and needs of the student. A master?s student may not have more than 6 elective credits in any one area.


Prerequisites: Bachelor’s degree in music; applicants must demonstrate experience and promise as a composer through the submission of appropriate materials; applicants without a bachelor’s degree in music must take the Graduate Music Diagnostic Examination before admission
Master of Music in Conducting

Choral Music

Music Bibliography and Research (MUSC 707) 2 credits
Major Area
a) Applied choral conducting (6-9 credits of MUSC 711Y)
b) Area studies (6-9 credits from choral literature, choral arranging,score reading, vocal pedagogy)
c) Recital (1 credit of MUSC 796)
16 credits
Music History (as determined by the Music Diagnostic Exam) 6 credits
Music Theory (at least one 700-level course and one analytical course) 6 credits
Music Electives (may include ensemble credits) 2 credits 
Total 32 credits

Ensemble requirement: Minimum of two semesters in an appropriate choral ensemble (MUSC 734)

Diction proficiency: Church Latin and any one of French, German, or Italian


Prerequisites: Bachelor's degree in music or music education (or the equivalent), including keyboard skills and proficiency in either voice, piano, or organ equivalent to the completion of the third year of undergraduate instruction at USC

Instrumental Music

Music Bibliography and Research (MUSC 707) 2 credits
Major Area
a) Applied instrumental conducting (6-9 credits of MUSC 711Y)
b) Area studies (6-9 credits from orchestral or band literature, score reading, instrumental arranging, string or wind pedagogy)
c) Recital (1 credit of MUSC 796)
16 credits
Music History (as determined by the Music Diagnostic Exam) 6 credits
Music Theory (at least one 700-level course and one analytical course) 6 credits
Music Electives (may include ensemble credits) 2 credits
Total 32 credits

Ensemble requirement: Minimum of two semesters in an appropriate instrumental ensemble (MUSC 734)


Prerequisites: Bachelor's degree in music or music education (or the equivalent), including keyboard skills and proficiency in either a keyboard or orchestral instrument (for orchestral conducting) or a wind or percussion instrument (for winds conducting) equivalent to the completion of the third year of undergraduate instruction at USC
Master of Music in Jazz Studies

Jazz Composition

Music Bibliography and Research (MUSC 707) 2 credits
Major Area
a) Jazz composition studies (8 credits of MUSC 716)
b)  Non jazz composition studies (2 credits of MUSC 516 or 716)
c) Jazz studies (9 credits from MUSC 524, 713, 714, 786)
d) Composition recital (1 credit of MUSC 790)
20 credits
Music History (as determined by the Music Diagnostic Exam) 3 credits
Music Theory (one 700-level analytical course) 3 credits
Music Electives (may include ensemble credits) 4 credits
Total 32 credits

Ensemble requirement: Minimum of two semesters in an appropriate jazz ensemble (MUSC 734)


Prerequisites: Bachelor's degree in jazz studies (or the equivalent), including keyboard skills and proficiency in a keyboard, orchestral, wind, or percussion instrument equivalent to the completion of the third year of undergraduate instruction at USC; documentation of significant jazz experience

Jazz Performance

Music Bibliography and Research (MUSC 707) 2 credits
Major Area
a) Applied studies (8 credits of MUSC 711Z)
b) Jazz studies (9 credits from MUSC 524, 713, 714, 786)
c) Recital (1 credit of MUSC 796)
d) Jazz Combo (2 credits of MUSC 735)
20 credits
Music History (as determined by the Music Diagnostic Exam) 3 credits
Music Theory (one 700-level analytical course) 3 credits
Music Electives (may include ensemble credits) 4 credits
Total 32 credits

Ensemble requirement: Minimum of two semesters in an appropriate jazz ensemble (MUSC 734)


Prerequisites: Bachelor’s degree in jazz performance (or the equivalent), including keyboard skills

Master of Music in Music History

Music Bibliography and Research (MUSC 707) 2 credits
Major Area
a) Music history courses (12 credits)
b) Thesis (3 credits)
15 credits
Advanced Music Research (MUSC 747) 2 credits
Music Theory (one 700-level analytical course required)  6 credits
Music Electives 4 credits
Nonmusic Elective 3 credits
Total 32 credits

Foreign language requirement (to be satisfied before enrollment in thesis credit): Reading proficiency in German. Substitution of another language must be approved in writing by both the student?s major professor and the Music Graduate Director.


Prerequisite: Bachelor’s degree in music (or the equivalent), including keyboard skills
Master of Music in Opera Theater

Opera Performance

Music Bibliography and Research (MUSC 707) 2 credits

Major Area
a) Applied studies (6 credits of MUSC 711V)
b) Opera experiences (2 credits of MUSC 780 and 2 credits of MUSC 781)[1]
c) Survey of the Opera (MUSC 545, 3 credits)
d) Advanced Diction (MUSC 778, 2 credits)

15 credits 
Cognate Studies[2] 6 credits
Music History (as determined by the Music Diagnostic Exam) 3 credits
Music Theory (one 700-level analytical course) 3 credits
Elective Studies (may include credits from the Department of Theatre) 3 credits
Total 32 credits

Ensemble requirement: Minimum of two semesters in an opera ensemble (MUSC 734)

Diction proficiency requirement: diction proficiency in French, German, and Italian (one proficiency must be satisfied at the end of one semester of full-time study, one must be satisfied before the completion of two semesters of full-time study, and the remaining must be satisfied before the Oral Comprehensive Examination)

Foreign language requirement: reading proficiency in any two of French, German, or Italian (one proficiency must be satisfied before the completion of two semesters of full-time study and the other before the Oral Comprehensive Examination)

[1]Successful completion of two credits of MUSC 781 includes the presentation of two significant opera roles and one minor role.

[2]Recommended: six credits from MUSC 581; THSP 572, 573, 770, 771.


Prerequisites: Admittance into the Master of Music degree in Performance (Voice)

Opera Stage Directing

Music Bibliography and Research (MUSC 707) 2 credits

Major Area
a) Applied studies (3 credits of MUSC 511V or MUSC 711V)
b) Opera experiences (2 credits of MUSC 780 and 4 credits of MUSC 782)[1]
c) Survey of the Opera (MUSC 545, 3 credits)
d) Advanced Diction (MUSC 778, 2 credits)

12 credits 
Cognate Studies[2] 8-9 credits
Music History (as determined by the Music Diagnostic Exam) 3 credits
Music Theory (one 700-level analytical course) 3 credits
Elective Studies (may include credits from the Department of Theatre) 3-4 credits
Total 32 credits

Ensemble requirement: Minimum of two semesters in an opera ensemble (MUSC 734)

Diction proficiency requirement: diction proficiency in French, German, and Italian (one proficiency must be satisfied at the end of one semester of full-time study, one must be satisfied before the completion of two semesters of full-time study, and the remaining must be satisfied before the Oral Comprehensive Examination)

Foreign language requirement: reading proficiency in any two of French, German, or Italian (one proficiency must be satisfied before the completion of two semesters of full-time study and the other before the Oral Comprehensive Examination)

[1]Successful completion of four credits of MUSC 782 includes serving as student assistant director for two operas and as stage director for two other operas.

[2]Recommended: eight to nine credits from MUSC 581; THSP 572, 573, 770, 771.


Prerequisites: Bachelor’s degree in music or music education, including keyboard skills and proficiency in either voice or keyboard equivalent to the completion of the fourth year of undergraduate instruction at USC; applicants must also be able to document extensive singing or acting experience
Master of Music in Performance

Guitar Performance

Music Bibliography and Research (MUSC 707) 2 credits 

Major Area
a) Applied studies (8 credits of MUSC 711N)
b) Guitar literature and/or pedagogy (3-6 credits)
c) Solo Recital (1 credit)

12-15 credits
Music History (as determined by the Music Diagnostic Exam) 6 credits
Music Theory (at least one 700-level course and one analytical course) 6 credits 
Music Electives 3-6 credits 
Total 32 credits

Concerto/Chamber music requirement (no credit): Public performance of a concerto from the standard guitar repertory or a chamber music program featuring appropriate guitar literature 


Prerequisite: Bachelor’s degree (or the equivalent) in guitar performance

Multiple Woodwinds Performance

Music Bibliography and Research (MUSC 707) 2 credits 

Major Area
a) Applied studies (9 credits)
   1) major instrument (5 credits of MUSC 711)[1]
   2) minor instruments (4 credits of MUSC 511)[2]
b) Solo Recital (1 credit)[3]
c) Chamber Music (2 credits)

12 credits
Music History (as determined by the Music Diagnostic Exam) 6 credits
Music Theory (at least one 700-level course and one analytical course) 6 credits 
Music Electives 6 credits 
Total 32 credits

Ensemble requirement: Minimum of two semesters in an appropriate instrumental ensemble (MUSC 734)

Concerto requirement (no credit): Public performance of a concerto from the major instrument?s standard repertory

[1]The applicant must perform at the graduate level on the major instrument (flute, clarinet, oboe, bassoon, saxophone) in order to be accepted into the master's program in multiple woodwinds.

[2]At least two semesters of study (at one credit per semester) are required in two minor instruments; a minimum proficiency level equivalent to the completion of the junior level of undergraduate study is required. With the consent of the woodwind faculty, three minor instruments may be studied; a minimum proficiency level equivalent to the completion of the junior level of undergraduate study is required for one of the instruments and the completion of the sophomore level for the two other instruments. Minimum proficiency levels on all minor instruments must be met before registering for recital credit.

[3]One-half of the master?s recital will be performed on the major instrument and one-half on the minor instruments.


Prerequisite: Bachelor’s degree (or the equivalent) in performance in the major wind instrument

Organ Performance

Music Bibliography and Research (MUSC 707) 2 credits 

Major Area
a) Applied studies (8 credits of MUSC 711O)
b) Organ literature and/or pedagogy (3-6 credits)
c) Solo Recital (1 credit)

12-15 credits
Music History (as determined by the Music Diagnostic Exam) 6 credits
Music Theory (at least one 700-level course and one analytical course) 6 credits 
Music Electives 3-6 credits 
Total 32 credits

Prerequisite: Bachelor’s degree (or the equivalent) in organ performance

Percussion Performance

Music Bibliography and Research (MUSC 707) 2 credits 

Major Area
a) Applied studies (11 credits of MUSC 711K)
b) Solo Recital (1 credit)

12 credits
Music History (as determined by the Music Diagnostic Exam) 6 credits
Music Theory (at least one 700-level course and one analytical course) 6 credits 
Music Electives 3-6 credits 
Total 32 credits

Ensemble requirement: Minimum of two semesters in an appropriate instrumental ensemble (MUSC 734)

Concerto requirement (no credit): Public performance of a concerto from the standard percussion repertory



Piano Performance

Music Bibliography and Research (MUSC 707) 2 credits 

Major Area
a) Applied studies (8 credits of MUSC 711P)
b) Piano literature and/or pedagogy (3-6 credits)
c) Solo Recital (1 credit)

12-15 credits
Music History (as determined by the Music Diagnostic Exam) 6 credits
Music Theory (at least one 700-level course and one analytical course) 6 credits 
Music Electives 3-6 credits 
Total 32 credits

Chamber music requirement: Minimum of one semester of chamber music (MUSC 735)



Strings Performance (Violin, Viola, Violoncello, String Bass)

Music Bibliography and Research (MUSC 707) 2 credits 

Major Area
a) Applied studies (9 credits of MUSC 711)
b) Solo Recital (1 credit)
c) Chamber music (2 credits of MUSC 735)

12 credits
Music History (as determined by the Music Diagnostic Exam) 6 credits
Music Theory (at least one 700-level course and one analytical course) 6 credits 
Music Electives 3-6 credits 
Total 32 credits

Ensemble requirement: Minimum of two semesters in an appropriate instrumental ensemble (MUSC 734)

Concerto requirement (no credit): Public performance of a concerto from the instrument?s standard repertory


Prerequisite: Bachelor’s degree (or the equivalent) in performance in the major instrument

Voice Performance

Music Bibliography and Research (MUSC 707) 2 credits 

Major Area
a) Applied studies (8 credits of MUSC 711V)
b) Opera, song literature, vocal pedagogy (3-6 credits)
c) Solo Recital (1 credit)

12-15 credits
Music History (as determined by the Music Diagnostic Exam) 6 credits
Music Theory (at least one 700-level course and one analytical course) 6 credits 
Music Electives 3-6 credits 
Total 32 credits

Ensemble requirement: Minimum of two semesters in an appropriate ensemble (MUSC 734)


Prerequisite: Bachelor’s degree (or the equivalent) in voice performance, including keyboard skills, and the equivalent of two years of college-level study of French, German, or Italian

Winds (flute, clarinet, oboe, bassoon, saxophone, trumpet, horn, euphonium, trombone, tuba)

Music Bibliography and Research (MUSC 707) 2 credits 

Major Area
a) Applied studies (9 credits of MUSC 711)
b) Solo Recital (1 credit)
c) Chamber music (2 credits of MUSC 735)

12 credits
Music History (as determined by the Music Diagnostic Exam) 6 credits
Music Theory (at least one 700-level course and one analytical course) 6 credits 
Music Electives 6 credits 
Total 32 credits

Ensemble requirement: Minimum of two semesters in an appropriate instrumental ensemble (MUSC 734)

Concerto requirement (no credit): Public performance of a concerto from the instrument?s standard repertory


Prerequisite: Bachelor’s degree (or the equivalent) in performance in the major instrument

Piano Pedagogy - Recital Track

Music Bibliography and Research (MUSC 707) 2 credits 

Major Area
a) Area studies (9 credits of piano pedagogy and 3 credits of piano literature or pedagogy)
b) Applied piano (6 credits of MUSC 711P)
c) Solo Recital (1 credit)

19 credits
Music History (as determined by the Music Diagnostic Exam) 3 credits
Music Theory (at least one 700-level course and one analytical course) 3 credits 
Music Electives 5 credits 
Total 32 credits

Piano Pedagogy - Thesis Track

Music Bibliography and Research (MUSC 707) 2 credits 

Major Area
a) Area studies (9 credits of piano pedagogy and 3 credits of piano literature or pedagogy)
b) Applied piano (4 credits of MUSC 711P)
c) Thesis (3 credits)

19 credits
Advanced Music Research (MUSC 747) 2 credits
Music History (as determined by the Music Diagnostic Exam) 3 credits
Music Theory (at least one 700-level course and one analytical course) 3 credits 
Music Electives 3 credits 
Total 32 credits


Master of Arts in Teaching
Three curriculum strands are offered to meet the teaching certification standards and educational needs of the students who will enroll in the proposed M.A.T. (Music).  Those three strands are (1) Vocal/Choral, (2) Instrumental – Strings, and (3) Instrumental – Winds/Percussion. Students may be required to fulfill undergraduate prerequisites appropriate for their areas of concentration.

MA Teaching - Core Requirements

The courses listed below are common to all MA Teaching Strands:

Core Courses  
Human Growth and Development (EDPY 705) 3 credits
The School in Modern Society (EDFN 749) 3 credits
Classroom Assessment Methods (EDRM 723) 3 credits 
Music Theory (as determined by the Music Diagnostic Exam) 3 credits 
Music History (as determined by the Music Diagnostic Exam) 3 credits
Teaching Internship (MUED 731) 12 credits
Teaching Internship Seminar (MUED 732) 3 credits
Total 30 credits

The following courses are specific to the Choral/Vocal Strand:

Choral/Vocal Strand Courses  
Specialized Elementary Methods (MUED 565) 2 credits
Choral Development and Related Materials (MUED 756) 3 credits
Materials and methods (either choral or elementary, MUED 554/7xx) 3 credits 
Choral ensemble (2 semesters of participation, MUSC 734) 2 credits 
Vocal Pedagogy (MUSC 577) 2 credits
MUSC/MUED Electives (select from: diction, choral literature, conducting, independent study, applied voice, applied piano, or ensemble) 3 credits
Total 15 credits

The following courses are specific to the Instrumental (Strings) Strand:

Instrumental (Strings) Strand Courses  
Methods for String Instruction I  (MUED 533) 2 credits
Practicum in Methods for String Instruction I  (MUED 533P) 1 credits
Methods for String Instruction II (MUED 534) 2 credits 
Practicum in Methods for String Instruction II (MUED 534P) 1 credits 
Orchestra (MUSC 734 - 2 semesters of participation) 2 credits
Advanced Conducting (MUSC 733B) 3 credits
Instrumental Development & Related Materials (MUED 753) 3 credits
Secondary instrument applied lesson (MUSC 501) 1 credits
Total 15 credits

Students must satisfy prerequisite skills in secondary string instruments, wind pedagogy, conducting, and piano


The following courses are specific to the Instrumental (Winds/Percussion) Strand:

Instrumental (Winds/Percussion) Strand Courses  
Organization & Administration of Music Programs (MUED 568) 2 credits
Practicum in Instrumental Music (MUED 568P) 1 credits
Wind Pedagogy II (MUED 557) 2 credits 
Symphonic Band (MUSC 734 - 2 semesters participation) 2 credits 
Students will select two of the following three courses:
a.  Advanced Conducting (MUSC 733B - 3 credits)
b.  Band Literature (MUED 784 - 3 credits)
c.  Instrumental Development & Related Materials (MUED 753 - 3 credits)
6 credits

MUED/MUSC Electives (select from: music education, conducting, independent study, primary or secondary instrument) 

2 credits 
Total 15 credits

Students must satisfy prerequisite skills in wind and percussion pedagogy, secondary instruments, conducting, and piano.


Master of Music Education

Thesis Track

Major Area
a) MUED 790 and MUED 795 (6 credits)
b) Music Education electives (6 credits), including at least one course in the student?s area of specialization
c) Thesis (3 credits)
15 credits
Music History (as determined by the Music Diagnostic Exam) 3 credits
Music Theory 3 credits
Music Electives (from outside music education; up to 6 credits may be taken in the College of Education) 11 credits
Total 32 credits

Recital Track

Major Area
a) MUED 790 and MUED 795 (6 credits)
b) Music Education electives (6 credits)
12 credits
Applied Music and Recital
a) Applied Studies (two 2-credit semesters)
b) Solo Recital (1 credit)
5 credits
Music History (as determined by the Music Diagnostic Exam) 3 credits
Music Theory 3 credits
Music Electives (from outside music education; conducting recommended; up to 3 credits may be taken in the College of Education) 9 credits
Total 32 credits

Nonthesis/Nonrecital Track

Major Area
a) MUED 790 and MUED 795 (6 credits)
b) Music Education electives (12 credits), including at least one course in the student?s area of specialization (up to 3 credits of conducting may be included)
18 credits
Music History (as determined by the Music Diagnostic Exam) 3 credits
Music Theory 3 credits
Music Electives (from outside music education, up to 3 credits may be taken in the College of Education) 11 credits
Total 35 credits

A minimum of two semesters in an appropriate ensemble (MUSC 734) is required for choral and instrumental majors in all tracks. 


Prerequisites: Bachelor’s degree in music or music education (or the equivalent), including teacher certification and (for applicants elementary music, choral music/conducting, or orchestral /conducting) keyboard skills
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CHAMBER MUSIC

Experience in chamber music is integral to the development of important skills and knowledge for certain musicians. Performance majors in jazz studies (performance track), multiple woodwinds, strings, or winds are therefore required to enroll in and satisfactorily complete at least two semesters of chamber music (MUSC 735), and piano majors are required to complete at least one semester. Chamber music is considered to be music written for an unconducted ensemble of 3 to 9 musicians, with one performer per part (examples: string quartets by Mozart; piano trios by Beethoven; wind quintets by Nielsen).

 

COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATION

All candidates for a master’s degree in music or music education are required to pass an oral comprehensive examination, which usually occurs during the last semester of enrollment. The request for scheduling the examination should be submitted through the Music Graduate Office at least 60 days in advance of the requested examination date by way of this downloadable form. The examination will cover the major area, music history/literature, and music theory. The examination committee will consist of five members — three in the student’s major area, one in music history, and one in music theory. A failed examination may be retaken only once. In extenuating circumstances, however, and with the approval of the Music Graduate Committee, the examination may be taken a third time. Because some faculty may not be available, the student should consult the Music Graduate Director before planning to take the examination during the summer months. The examination must be passed at least 15 days but not more than two calendar years before the degree is to be conferred.

COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATION FOR MASTER OF MUSIC EDUCATION AND MASTER OF ARTS IN TEACHING STUDENTS

Students may use the traditional format in which all questions are presented by the five-person faculty committee and answered during the normal comprehensive exam period. Students also have the option to choose a format in which the examination committee chair will assemble up to 5 questions (one from each committee member) for the student to research and prepare a response prior to the examination date. Committee members who prefer the traditional format will not submit a written question but will present their questions orally during the examination period. Each of the written questions should require no more than a five-page response (double spaced, 12 point Times Roman), excluding references. APA writing style is recommended. Following is the procedure for using the Optional Format.

  1. The examination chair will solicit a researchable question from each committee member who wishes to participate in this format. The chair will provide the solicited questions to the student 3 weeks prior to the oral examination date.
  2. The student will have 2 weeks from the date of receiving the questions to research and compose his/her responses.
  3. The student will submit his/her written answers, complete with page numbers and references, to the committee chair one week prior to the exam date. Responses to all questions should be compiled into sufficient spiral bound copies to be distributed to the committee by the committee chair.
  4. Each committee member will lead the discussion for the responses to his/her question during the exam time. Those committee members who are not directly responsible for selection of questions are not obligated to read the answers or participate in the discussion specifically related to the written question, but may choose to do so.
  5. Those committee members who do not choose to provide a researchable question will ask the students questions on their discipline during the oral exam time.
  6. Voting will occur in the normal fashion at the end of the oral examination period.

CONCERTO REQUIREMENT

As part of their graduate program, all students pursuing the MM-performance degree in guitar, percussion, strings, multiple woodwinds, or winds are required to perform publicly on campus a complete concerto from the instrument’s standard repertory (with permission of the instructor, guitar majors may present a chamber music recital). The concerto must have been learned during the student’s study at USC. This noncredit requirement is in addition to the degree recital. Because some members of the area faculty may not be available, a student should first consult the Music Graduate Director before submitting a prospectus or planning to fulfill the concerto requirement during the summer months.

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ENSEMBLE

A minimum of two semesters of major ensemble (MUSC 734) is required of all master’s students majoring in conducting, jazz studies, multiple woodwinds, opera theater, percussion, strings, voice, winds, choral music education, or instrumental music education. 

FOREIGN LANGUAGE

Reading proficiency in at least one foreign language is required for the Master of Music degree in choral and orchestral conducting, the Master of Music degree in music history, and the Master of Music degree in Opera Theater (see the respective degree requirements). This proficiency, which must be demonstrated prior to registration for recital or thesis credit, may be satisfied by earning a grade of at least "B" in a foreign language reading course (e.g. GERM 615) or by successfully completing an examination given by the appropriate USC foreign language faculty. Choral conducting majors may satisfy the requirement through the successful completion of at least two years of college-level foreign language study. Students pursuing the Master of Music degree in orchestral conducting must demonstrate the equivalent of one year of college-level study of French, German, or Italian before enrolling in recital credit.


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JURY PERFORMANCES

All students taking applied music at the 511 or 711 level must complete a performance jury before the area faculty at the end of each regular academic semester (fall and spring). If a student receives an “Incomplete” in an applied course because of failure to take a jury examination, the incomplete may be removed through either of the following methods: 1) passing a special jury examination; or 2) enrolling in the same course again the following semester for additional credit and taking a double jury exam, the grade of which will be used in determining the grade for both semesters. At the discretion of the teacher, a student who is to present a degree recital may be exempted from a jury in the semester that the recital is presented.

All students taking graduate-level composition or jazz composition will present their work to the composition or jazz faculty at the end of each regular academic semester (fall and spring). Students may be quizzed on any aspect of their composition(s). Those enrolled in composition-thesis credit are exempted from this requirement unless the composition teacher indicates otherwise.

MAXIMUM PERIOD ALLOWED

Six years is regarded as the maximum time allowed for graduate course credits to count toward a master’s degree. Should more time be needed to complete a degree program, special arrangements may be made with the Graduate School for the revalidation of outdated credits in courses given by the University, if approved by the Music Graduate Director (see the current Graduate Studies Bulletin for information concerning the revalidation fee). For revalidation of USC courses, the student must demonstrate a contemporary knowledge of the course content by passing an examination administered by a music faculty member who currently teaches the course. Any student who fails to complete the program in the period allowed becomes subject to changes in degree requirements adopted up to a date six years prior to graduation.

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PROGRAM OF STUDY

Within the first twelve (12) months of matriculation, all master’s students must submit to the Music Graduate Director a Program of Study proposal that has been approved by the student’s academic advisor. The electronic form is found at http://gradschool.sc.edu/doclibrary/documents/mastersprogramofstudy.pdf. The master’s oral examination cannot be scheduled until the Program of Study has been approved.

RECITALS

Students pursuing the Master of Music degree in performance, conducting, jazz performance, opera performance, or piano pedagogy (recital track), and those pursuing the Master of Music Education (recital track) are required to present a full-length solo recital of 50 to 65 minutes; students in jazz composition must present a 50-65 minute recital of works composed or arranged since beginning graduate work at USC. The literature performed on a solo recital will be learned specifically for that performance. All recitals will be adjudicated by at least a three-member committee selected from the area faculty. Because some members of the recital committee may not be available, a student should first consult the Music Graduate Director before submitting a prospectus or planning to schedule a degree recital for presentation during the summer months. In addition, a degree recital may not be presented unless the student has officially enrolled in recital credit and is enrolled at the University during the term the recital is presented. In order to receive applied lessons, a student must be enrolled for applied credit.

The student should submit a typed recital prospectus to his or her major professor, who will see that it is signed by each member of the area faculty and submitted to the Music Graduate Office at least three weeks before the recital is to be presented. The prospectus will include a listing of the works to be performed with the approximate duration of each work listed. Guidelines for preparing the prospectus are available in room 101K or online. All recitals (including those presented off campus) must be scheduled through the Music Office and should be presented when classes are officially in session. Each graduate recital is to be recorded and a copy archived in the Music Library (a video recording is required of all conducting recitals).

A master's recital judged unsatisfactory by the area faculty may be repeated once.  The repeated recital may contain any or all of the contents of the unsatisfactory program.  If two masters recitals (including a repeated recital) are judged unsatisfactory, the student's status as a master's candidate will be terminated, and he or she will need to fulfill all of the requirements for admission then in effect in order to be readmitted to the master's program. A student may appeal to the Music Graduate Committee regarding a decision to discontinue master's status.

With the prior approval of the area faculty and the Music Graduate Director, a student pursuing the Master of Music degree in performance may count a chamber music or concerto recital or a major opera role as elective credit (such a presentation cannot replace the required solo recital). The literature performed should have been learned during the student’s study at USC. The following pertain:

  • Opera Role (MUSC 793) — The approved role, which is to be presented and adjudicated in a public performance, must be considered a major (i.e., not supporting) role in an opera. With the approval of the Music Graduate Committee, the opera role may be presented outside the Columbia metropolitan area if the performance is video-recorded (one member of the area faculty should be present for the video-taping). 
  • Concerto Recital (MUSC 794) — The work chosen for the concerto recital should come from the standard concerto repertory of the student’s performance medium. Public performance with an orchestra (or the appropriate original “accompanying” instrumentation) is required. With the permission of the Music Graduate Committee, the concerto recital may be presented outside the Columbia metropolitan area if the performance is video-recorded (one member of the area faculty should be present for the video-taping). 
  • Chamber music Recital (MUSC 795) — The works should be chosen from the standard chamber music repertory of the student’s performance medium, though one recently composed work that may not have become a “standard” repertory item may be included.


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THESIS

Students pursuing the Master of Music degree in piano pedagogy (thesis track), music history, music theory, and those pursuing the Master of Music Education degree (thesis track) are required to write a thesis; composition majors should consult information available from area faculty. In consultation with the student and the student’s advisor, the Music Graduate Director will appoint a three-member thesis committee, one of whom will be the director of the thesis. The thesis director will advise the student in the preparation of both the prospectus and the thesis. Any student who wishes to use University facilities or submit a thesis must be officially enrolled, and those who wish to confer with the faculty on thesis or composition work must be officially enrolled for thesis credit. All theses are approved by the student’s thesis committee, the Dean of the School of Music, and the Dean of the Graduate School. Because some members of the thesis committee may not be available, the student should first consult the Music Graduate Director before submitting a prospectus or thesis during the summer months.

Prospectus —One copy of the prospectus, approved by the appropriate faculty, is to be submitted to the Music Graduate Office.  If corrections are required, a corrected copy is to be filed in that office within one month. Guidelines for preparing the prospectus are available from room 101K or online. 

Thesis — After the thesis director has approved the paper but no fewer than 60 days before the degree is to be conferred, the student should submit three typewritten copies of the thesis for consideration by the thesis committee. Each copy is to have the thesis director’s signature of approval in the upper right-hand corner of the title page. The thesis director is responsible for making sure that the corrections and suggestions from the thesis committee are integrated into the document. No later than 30 days before the degree is to be conferred, the student should submit one copy of the corrected thesis to the Music Graduate Office for final approval by the thesis committee and the Dean. At least 20 days before the date of graduation, three signed copies are to be submitted to the Graduate School for approval and binding. Guidelines for preparing the thesis are available from room 101K.

Composition Thesis —The thesis for the Master of Music Composition degree must be a chamber work at least 15 minutes in length. (A work for large ensemble may be substituted provided its duration is at least 15 minutes.) A composition prospectus, describing the instrumentation, general scope and resources of the work must be approved by the thesis committee before the student enrolls in MUSC 799 or begins composition of the work.

TRANSFER CREDIT

Up to 6 semester hours of credit with a grade of B or better (or equivalent grades if a different system is used) from other NASM-accredited institutions may be transferred for use toward a master’s degree in music or music education if those credits were not counted toward another graduate degree. All transfer credits must be approved by both the Music Graduate Director and the Dean of the Graduate School, and all must be dated within the six-year period allowed for a master’s degree. There is no revalidation mechanism for transfer credit that does not fall within this time limit. Grades earned on credits transferred from other schools do not count in the USC grade-point average. 

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SECOND MASTER’S DEGREE FROM USC

In general, when applying for a second master’s degree from USC, a student must meet the requirements of the second degree in full. No more than 9 semester hours from the program of study of the previous USC degree may be applied toward the second USC degree. Students should consult the Music Graduate Director for further information. 

VOTING PROCEDURES FOR MASTER’S RECITALS AND EXAMINATIONS

Voting on all graduate recitals and examinations (oral and written) will employ written ballots. A two-thirds (2/3 or 66.6%) majority positive vote of the examining committee is required to pass a recital or examination. A “no” vote must be accompanied by a written justification (courteous wording is expected). If not passed on the first attempt, a recital or examination (or a portion of the exam) may be repeated once. A student may petition the Music Graduate Committee to undertake a failed recital examination a third time, but a favorable ruling will require a 2/3 majority of the voting members of the committee.

All master’s oral examinations are to be chaired by the student’s major professor. Ballots for the comprehensive examination will be available at the conclusion of the oral examination, and discussion may precede voting. The student will be informed of the results (but not the precise spread) of the vote. If a faculty member is not present for the entire oral examination, that faculty member should not cast a vote on the portions of the questioning that were not observed.

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MASTER'S DEGREE FLOW CHART

ADMISSION TO DEGREE PROGRAM
USC GRADUATE SCHOOL PROGRAM OF STUDY
(submit within first twelve months of matriculation)
CONCERTO REQUIREMENT
(MM-performance in guitar, percussion, strings, multiple woodwinds, winds)
FOREIGN LANGUAGE
(MM-conducting in choral or orchestral music; MM in music history, MM in Opera Theater)
RECITAL OR THESIS
(all but MME-nonthesis/nonrecital track)
ORAL COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATION
(after approval of the program of study, usually in the last semester of study)
Application for graduation should be made early in the semester.


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DOCTORAL DEGREES


Course Requirements

The DMA requires the successful completion of an approved program of graduate-level study (minimum of 48 credits beyond the master's degree), including twelve (12) hours of dissertation credit or the equivalent. The PhD requires the successful completion of an approved program of graduate-level study (minimum of 60 credits beyond the master's degree), including twelve (12) hours of dissertation credit or the equivalent. Unless approved by the student's doctoral committee and the Music Graduate Director, all credits taken beyond the master's degree must be at the 700 level or higher. Transfer of appropriate post-master's credits from another institution (maximum of 12 credits) may be permitted as long as the final 36 credits of doctoral work (including all credit for the dissertation or dissertation requirement) are taken on the Columbia campus.  All doctoral students must submit a Program of Study, approved by advisor and Graduate Director, within the first 24 months of matriculation (The Program of Study form is currently located at http://gradschool.sc.edu/doclibrary/documents/doctoralprogramofstudy.pdf.) Doctoral students cannot be admitted to candidacy until the Program of Study has been submitted. Doctoral students must spend one year in candidacy before graduation.  After a student has been admitted to candidacy, the candidate must satisfactorily complete all courses and studies as specified by the School of Music. No more than 12 credits with grades of C+ or below that have been taken at the doctoral level may be accumulated within an eight-year period. In addition, an average grade of B (3.0) is required for all courses numbered 700 or above as well as for all courses taken in the major area. Grades earned on credits transferred from other schools do not count in the grade-point average. An accumulation of grades of C+ or below on 12 credits of graduate course work taken at the University within an eight-year period will disqualify a student for a doctoral degree (see the University Graduate Studies Bulletin for further information). For further information about academic regulations see the Graduate Studies Bulletin.

Degree Programs 

The curricula given below outline normal expectations for the successful completion of the chosen degree and emphasis. A doctoral degree can be earned in as few as two years of work beyond the master?s degree, though the usual time is three or more years.  It is expected that all students in DMA performance, piano pedagogy, and conducting degree programs will include at least two 700-level music history courses (one MUSC 744 Topics in Music History course must be completed) and at least three 700-level music theory courses in their programs of study.  No more than three credits of ensemble and chamber music (MUSC 734 and 735) may be included under ?Cognate Studies.? Area literature courses may be used in the ?Cognate Studies? area of the degree but do not substitute for required music history courses.  Students who have developed extensive research and writing skills may petition the Music Graduate Committee to exempt MUSC 747 (for further information contact the Music Graduate Director).


Composition

Major Area[1]
a) composition studies (12 credits of MUSC 816)[2]
b) composition-related courses (6 credits to be chosen, in consultation with the student?s academic advisor; may include MUSC 816, MUSC 717, MUSC 737, and other such courses; credits may not count toward a Doctoral Minor or Other Studies)
c) dissertation composition (10 credits of MUSC 899)[3]
d) composition recital (1 credit of MUSC 890)[4]
e) document (1 credit of MUSC 897)[5]

30 credits

Doctoral Minor (in an approved field of music, such as music theory, music technology, music history, performance; courses to be chosen in consultation with the student's academic advisor)

 12 credits

Other Studies (as approved by the student's academic advisor; may include study outside the School of Music)

6 credits

Residency: A minimum of four semesters of full-time study and residence on the USC-Columbia campus is required. Three of the four semesters must be consecutive. Under no circumstances may the Comprehensive Examination be taken before the three consecutive semesters and all coursework (exclusive of the dissertation requirement) have been completed.

Foreign language requirement (to be satisfied before the Comprehensive Examination can be scheduled): reading proficiency in French, German, or Italian

DMA-Composition students with weaknesses in counterpoint, orchestra­tion, score reading, conducting, or keyboard skills should remedy these deficiencies before taking the Comprehensive Examination. Note that these courses may not be applied toward the 48 credits needed to complete the DMA degree. DMA-Composition students must have their compositions represented every semester on program-approved concerts. In addition, composition students are expected to attend master classes, lectures, and performances sponsored by the composition faculty.

[1]Unless taken elsewhere, advanced courses in post-tonal analysis, tonal analysis, computer music, and Music Bibliography/Research (MUSC 707) must be included in a composition student's doctoral studies.

[2]MUSC 816 is a 3-credit course during Fall and Spring terms, and a 1-credit course during either Summer term.

[3]A composition or group of compositions totaling at least 20 minutes for large forces. The candidate must have passed the Comprehensive Examination before beginning work on the dissertation. Further, the dissertation project and research document must be approved by the student's dissertation committee before the candidate begins work. Approval is obtained by submitting both a dissertation project and research document prospectus. Guidelines for preparing the dissertation project and research document prospectus, dissertation composition, and research document are available from the Music Graduate Office.

[4]All DMA students in composition must present a public performance of at least 30 minutes of original work written during their course of study. These works should demonstrate compositional mastery in a variety of media. The recital may be scheduled anytime after the comprehensive examinations have been successfully passed.

[5]A 25-40 page analytical, historical, or theoretical paper developed in conjunction with the dissertation advisor.


Prerequisite: Master of Music degree in composition (32 credits)
DMA in Conducting

Choral Conducting

Major Area
a) area studies (14 credits, including at least 6 credits of applied conducting and studies in choral literature, choral methods, score reading, etc.)
b) dissertation requirement (12 credits, consisting of recital preparation [6 credits of MUSC 891], 4 recitals [4 credits from MUSC 892 and 896], and document [2 credits of MUSC 897])

26 credits
Advanced Research (MUSC 747)  2 credits
Cognate Studies (minimum of two 700-level music history courses [one MUSC 744 Topics in Music History course must be completed], at least three 700-level music theory courses, and maximum three credits of ensemble and chamber music [MUSC 734 and 735]) 20 credits

Diction proficiency (to be satisfied before admission to doctoral candidacy): proficiency in two foreign languages (French, German, Italian) not passed during the admission process

Foreign language requirement (to be satisfied before the Comprehensive Examination can be scheduled): reading knowledge of French, German, or Italian (the chosen language must differ from the one used to satisfy the foreign language requirement for the master's degree in choral conducting)

Ensemble requirement: Minimum of two semesters in an appropriate choral ensemble (MUSC 734)


Prerequisite: Master of Music degree in choral conducting or the equivalent (32 credits)[1]
[1]Prospective doctoral students in choral conducting may have a master’s degree in either voice or choral music education, but applicants must demonstrate the equivalent of the master’s degree in choral conducting, including proficiencies in the following: choral conducting, applied music (equivalent to the completion of the junior year of voice, piano, or organ instruction), diction (Church Latin and any one of French, German, or Italian), keyboard skills, and foreign language (reading proficiency in French, German, or Italian).

Instrumental Conducting

Major Area
a) area studies (14 credits, including 6 credits of applied conducting and studies in orchestral or band literature, score reading, etc.)
b) dissertation requirement (12 credits, consisting of recital preparation [6 credits of MUSC 891], 4 recitals [4 credits from MUSC 892 and 896], and document [2 credits of MUSC 897])

26 credits
Advanced Research (MUSC 747)  2 credits
Cognate Studies (minimum of two 700-level music history courses [one MUSC 744 Topics in Music History course must be completed], at least three 700-level music theory courses, and maximum three credits of ensemble and chamber music [MUSC 734 and 735]) 20 credits

Foreign language requirement (to be satisfied before the Comprehensive Examination can be scheduled): reading proficiency in French, German, or Italian (for orchestral conducting majors, the chosen language must differ from the one used to satisfy the master?s foreign language requirement)

Ensemble requirement: Minimum of two semesters in an appropriate instrumental ensemble (MUSC 734)


Prerequisite: Master of Music degree in orchestral or winds conducting or the equivalent (32 credits)[2]
[2]Prospective doctoral students in orchestral conducting may have a master’s degree in a related performance area (e.g., in violin performance), but they must demonstrate the equivalent of the master’s degree in orchestral conducting, including proficiencies in the following: conducting, applied music (equivalent to senior-level proficiency in a keyboard or orchestral instrument), keyboard skills, and foreign-language (the equivalent of one year of college-level study in French, German, or Italian).
Prospective doctoral students in winds conducting may have a master’s degree in a related performance area (e.g., in trumpet performance) or in music education (recital emphasis), but they must demonstrate doctoral-level conducting abilities as well as senior-level proficiency in a keyboard or band instrument.

DMA in Performance

Flute, Oboe, Bassoon, Clarinet, Saxophone, Trumpet, Horn, Trombone, Euphonium or Tuba

Major Area
a) Applied studies (6 credits of MUSC 811)
b) Area solo literature (2 credits of MUSC 740)
c) Area pedagogy (2 credits of MUSC 801)
d) Dissertation requirement (12 credits, including 6 credits of recital preparation (MUSC 891) 4 recitals (from MUSC 892, 894, 895, 896), and document (2 credits of MUSC 897))
e) Chamber music (2 credits of MUSC 735)

24 credits
Advanced Research (MUSC 747)  2 credits
Cognate Studies (minimum of two 700-level music history courses [one MUSC 744 Topics in Music History course must be completed], at least three 700-level music theory courses, and maximum three credits of ensemble and chamber music [MUSC 734 and 735]) 22 credits

Foreign language requirement to be satisfied before the comprehensive examination can be scheduled: reading proficiency in French, German or Italian

Ensemble requirement: Minimum of two semesters in an appropriate instrumental ensemble (MUSC 734)


Prerequisite: Master of Music degree in performance or the equivalent (32 credits)

Guitar

Major Area
a) Applied guitar (6 credits of MUSC 811N)
b) Guitar literature (2 credits of MUSC 740N)
c) Guitar pedagogy (2 credits of MUSC 801)
d) Dissertation requirement (12 credits, including 6 credits of recital preparation (MUSC 891) 4 recitals (from MUSC 892, 894, 895, 896), and document (2 credits of MUSC 897))

22 credits
Advanced Research (MUSC 747)  2 credits
Cognate Studies (minimum of two 700-level music history courses [one MUSC 744 Topics in Music History course must be completed], at least three 700-level music theory courses, and maximum three credits of ensemble and chamber music [MUSC 734 and 735]) 24 credits

Foreign language requirement to be satisfied before the comprehensive examination can be scheduled: reading proficiency in French, German or Italian


Prerequisite: Master of Music degree in the guitar performance or the equivalent (32 credits)

Organ

Major Area
a) Applied organ (6 credits of MUSC 811O)
b) Organ literature (2-4 credits of MUSC 740O)
c) Organ pedagogy (2 credits of MUSC 801)
d) Dissertation requirement (12 credits, including 6 credits of recital preparation (MUSC 891) 4 recitals (from MUSC 892, 894, 895, 896), and document (2 credits of MUSC 897))

22-24 credits
Advanced Research (MUSC 747)  2 credits
Cognate Studies (minimum of two 700-level music history courses [one MUSC 744 Topics in Music History course must be completed], at least three 700-level music theory courses, and maximum three credits of ensemble and chamber music [MUSC 734 and 735]) 22-24 credits

Foreign language requirement to be satisfied before the comprehensive examination can be scheduled: reading proficiency in French, German or Italian


Prerequisite: Master of Music degree in organ performance or the equivalent (32 credits)

Percussion

Major Area
a) Applied percussion (6 credits of MUSC 811K)
b) Percussion literature (2 credits of MUSC 740K)
c) Percussion pedagogy (2 credits of MUSC 801)
d) Dissertation requirement (12 credits, including 6 credits of recital preparation (MUSC 891) 4 recitals (from MUSC 892, 894, 895, 896), and document (2 credits of MUSC 897))
e) Chamber music (2 credits MUSC 735)

24 credits
Advanced Research (MUSC 747)  2 credits
Cognate Studies (minimum of two 700-level music history courses [one MUSC 744 Topics in Music History course must be completed], at least three 700-level music theory courses, and maximum three credits of ensemble and chamber music [MUSC 734 and 735]) 22 credits

Foreign language requirement to be satisfied before the comprehensive examination can be scheduled: reading proficiency in French, German or Italian

Ensemble requirement: Minimum of two semesters in an appropriate instrumental ensemble (MUSC 734)


Prerequisite: Master of Music degree in percussion performance or the equivalent (32 credits)

Piano

Major Area
a) Applied piano (6 credits of MUSC 811P)
b) Piano literature (2-4 credits of MUSC 740P and/or MUSC 775)
c) piano pedagogy (2-4 credits of MUSC 801 and/or MUSC 773-776)
d) Dissertation requirement (12 credits, including 6 credits of recital preparation (MUSC 891) 4 recitals (from MUSC 892, 894, 895, 896), and document (2 credits of MUSC 897))
e) Chamber music (1 credit of MUSC 735)

23-26 credits
Advanced Research (MUSC 747)  2 credits
Cognate Studies (minimum of two 700-level music history courses [one MUSC 744 Topics in Music History course must be completed], at least three 700-level music theory courses, and maximum three credits of ensemble and chamber music [MUSC 734 and 735]) 20-23 credits

Foreign language requirement to be satisfied before the comprehensive examination can be scheduled: reading proficiency in French, German or Italian


Prerequisite: Master of Music degree in piano performance or the equivalent (32 credits)

Violin, Viola, Cello, Double Bass

Major Area
a) Applied studies (6 credits of MUSC 811)
b) Area solo literature (2-3 credits of MUSC 740)
c) Area pedagogy (2 credits of MUSC 801)
d) Dissertation requirement (12 credits, including 6 credits of recital preparation (MUSC 891) 4 recitals (from MUSC 892, 894, 895, 896), and document (2 credits of MUSC 897))
e) Chamber music (2 credits of MUSC 735)

24-25 credits
Advanced Research (MUSC 747)  2 credits
Cognate Studies (minimum of two 700-level music history courses [one MUSC 744 Topics in Music History course must be completed], at least three 700-level music theory courses, and maximum three credits of ensemble and chamber music [MUSC 734 and 735]) 21-22 credits

Foreign language requirement to be satisfied before the comprehensive examination can be scheduled: reading proficiency in French, German or Italian

Ensemble requirement: Minimum of two semesters in an appropriate instrumental ensemble (MUSC 734)


Prerequisite: Master of Music degree in violin, viola, or violoncello performance or the equivalent (32 credits)

Voice

Major Area
a) Applied studies (6 credits of MUSC 811V)
b) Vocal literature (2-3 credits of MUSC 740V)
c) Vocal pedagogy (2 credits of MUSC 801)
d) Dissertation requirement (12 credits, including 6 credits of recital preparation (MUSC 891) 4 recitals (from MUSC 892, 894, 895, 896), and document (2 credits of MUSC 897))
e) Chamber music (2 credits of MUSC 735)

24 credits
Advanced Research (MUSC 747)  2 credits
Cognate Studies (minimum of two 700-level music history courses [one MUSC 744 Topics in Music History course must be completed], at least three 700-level music theory courses, and maximum three credits of ensemble and chamber music [MUSC 734 and 735]) 22 credits

Foreign language requirement to be satisfied before the comprehensive examination can be scheduled: reading proficiency in French, German or Italian (the chosen language must differ from the one used to satisfy the foreign language requirement for the master?s degree in voice performance)


Prerequisite: Master of Music degree in voice performance or the equivalent (32 credits)[1]
[1]Including diction and foreign-language skills (see the requirements for the Master of Music degree in voice performance).

DMA in Piano Pedagogy

Piano Pedagogy Recital/Treatise

Major Area
a) Area studies (9 credits of piano pedagogy, including MUSC 773-774 and 3 credits of piano literature or pedagogy)
b) Applied piano (4 credits of MUSC 811P)
c) Piano pedagogy (2 credits of MUSC 801)
d) Dissertation requirement (12 credits, including 6 credits of recital preparation (MUSC 891) 2 recitals (from MUSC 892, 894, 895, 896), and treatise (6 credits of MUSC 898))

28 credits
Advanced Research (MUSC 747) 2 credits
Cognate Studies (minimum of two 700-level music history courses [one MUSC 744 Topics in Music History course must be completed], at least three 700-level music theory courses, and maximum three credits of ensemble and chamber music [MUSC 734 and 735]) 18 credits

Foreign language requirement to be satisfied before the comprehensive examination can be scheduled: reading proficiency in French, German or Italian (the chosen language must differ from the one used to satisfy the foreign language requirement for the master?s degree in voice performance)


Piano Pedagogy Dissertation

Major Area
a) Area studies (9 credits of piano pedagogy, including MUSC 773-774 and 3 credits of piano literature or pedagogy)
b) Applied piano (4 credits of MUSC 811P)
c) Piano pedagogy (2 credits of MUSC 801)
d) Dissertation requirement (12 credits, including 6 credits of recital preparation (MUSC 891) 2 recitals (from MUSC 892, 894, 895, 896), and treatise (6 credits of MUSC 898))

28 credits
Advanced Research (MUSC 747) 2 credits
Cognate Studies (minimum of two 700-level music history courses [one MUSC 744 Topics in Music History course must be completed], at least three 700-level music theory courses, and maximum three credits of ensemble and chamber music [MUSC 734 and 735]) 18 credits

Foreign language requirement to be satisfied before the comprehensive examination can be scheduled: reading proficiency in French, German or Italian (the chosen language must differ from the one used to satisfy the foreign language requirement for the master?s degree in voice performance)


Prerequisite: Master of Music degree in piano performance or piano pedagogy or the equivalent (32 credits)
PhD in Music Education
Major Area
a) Music education courses (21 credits to include MUED 790, 795, 796)
b) Special research project (3 credits of MUED 890)
c) dissertation (12 credits of MUSC 899)
36 credits
Educational Research Core
a) Educational Statistics I (EDRM 710)
b) Educational Statistics II (EDRM 711)
c) Qualitative Research in Education (EDRM 740)
9 credits
Other Studies in Music and Related Fields
A minimum of 9 credits is required in MUSC courses to include at least one adviser-approved course in music history and one adviser-approved course in music theory. Remaining credits will be selected from adviser-approved courses including applied music, conducting, literature and up to 6 credits in related areas such as psychology and education.
15 credits

Foreign language requirement (to be satisfied before the Comprehensive Examination can be scheduled): reading proficiency in French, German, or Italian
Prerequisite: Master of Music Education degree or the equivalent (32-35 credits)

Doctoral Minor - 12 credits

Doctoral students are encouraged to develop an area of musical expertise outside the doctoral major. A doctoral minor is therefore available in the areas listed below. The chosen doctoral minor may not have been the student's major at the master's level nor may it be in another area of the degree major (performance majors may not choose a doctoral minor in another area of performance, and conducting majors may not choose another area of conducting). A doctoral minor requires the completion of a minimum of 12 post-master's graduate credits, of which at least nine must be completed at USC, and approval from the minor area faculty and the graduate director. During the Comprehensive Examination students who have been approved for a doctoral minor will also be tested in that area. The following are general guidelines for a doctoral minor:

Composition
Completion of at least 12 credits of composition, including 4 credits of applied composition (MUSC 716) and 6 credits of closely related classroom study (e.g., arranging, orchestration)
Conducting
Completion of at least 12 credits of conducting, including 4 credits of applied conducting (MUSC 711) and 6 credits of related studies (e.g., area literature, methods, score reading, performance practice); credit for one public conducting recital (MUSC 796) may be included if scheduling permits
Jazz Studies 
Completion of at least 12 credits in the chosen area
Music History, Music Theory, Piano Pedagogy, or Music Education
Completion of at least 12 credits in the chosen area (no teacher certification is required for the Music Education minor)
Opera Theater
Completion of at least 12 credits in opera-theater studies, including MUSC 545, 3 credits of approved studies in the Department of Theatre, 2 credits each in MUSC 734 and MUSC 780, and either 2 credits of MUSC 781 (for an emphasis in voice performance) or THSP 759 (for an emphasis in stage direction); dual credit for MUSC 793-796 or MUSC 891-896 when enrolled in MUSC 781 is not permitted
Performance
Completion of at least 12 credits in the chosen area, including 6 credits in applied music (MUSC 711) and 4-9 credits in the area literature and pedagogy; credit for one public solo recital (MUSC 796) may be included

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CANDIDACY 

All recommendations for admission to doctoral candidacy are approved by the area faculty, Music Graduate Director, and the Dean of the Graduate School. A student must have been fully admitted as a degree student before attempting to fulfill any doctoral candidacy requirements (examination and recital). Admittance to degree candidacy indicates that the student is fully qualified to pursue the desired doctoral degree. Students who have not been admitted to doctoral candidacy after the equivalent of two semesters of full-time study may not be permitted to continue doctoral studies.  Doctoral students must spend one year in candidacy before graduation. 

The following are required before doctoral candidacy can be considered: 

1.   Completion of the equivalent of one semester of full-time study 

2.   Successful completion of the written Doctoral Candidacy Examination

Each doctoral student must take a three-hour written examination in the major area no later than the second semester of full-time study (or the equivalent). The examination may be passed, passed with conditions, or failed. If failed, the exam may be retaken only once. The following guidelines pertain to specific doctoral majors: 

Composition — See information available on-line at www.music.sc.edu/AP/Grad/DMAComp.html 

Conducting or Performance — The Written Candidacy Examination in conducting or performance covers the areas listed below. Emphasis varies from area to area on each aspect. 

    • The candidate should exhibit a functional knowledge of literature, composers, and performance practices of various historical periods as they relate to the candidate’s specific conducting or performance medium. 
    • The candidate should exhibit a functional knowledge of notation and ornamentation, particularly that from historical periods that contain outstanding literature for the student’s particular medium (e.g., Baroque ornamentation, avant-garde notation). 
    • The candidate should display an understanding of the history of the chosen conducting or performance medium as well as past and present artisans of distinction. (Instrumentalists, for example, should exhibit a functional knowledge of prominent manufacturers and builders of their particular instrument, its physical characteristics, and so forth.) 
    • The candidate should show an ability to relate the conducting or performance medium to its role in various performance situations (e.g., vocal solo recitals, opera, choir). 

A candidate for the doctoral degree in conducting or performance is expected to have acquired a level of knowledge in the major area beyond that expected of one who has completed a master’s degree in the area. 

Piano Pedagogy — The Written Candidacy Examination in piano pedagogy covers the following areas: 

    •  Sequencing of concepts and literature 
    •  Performance analysis, including musical interpretation, style, level of complexity, practice procedures 
    •  History of piano instruction 
    •  Relationship of learning theories to piano study 
    •  Literature, composers, and performance practices of various historical periods as they relate to the piano 
    •  Error detection (ability to hear errors on a recording compared to the printed score) 

A candidate for the doctoral degree in piano pedagogy is expected to have acquired a level of knowledge in both piano pedagogy and piano literature (elementary, intermediate, and advanced levels) beyond that expected of one who has completed a master’s degree in piano pedagogy. 

Music Education —Within the three-hour written examination period, the student will answer selected questions concerning general knowledge in music education. In addition, the student will review a research article using the template designated by music education faculty. Students will be expected to follow the writing standards established by music education faculty.  Faculty will read and submit evaluations within 10-14 days after receiving the materials. 

3.   Recommendation of the area faculty, which will be based on contact with the student as well as on the following according to the particular degree emphasis:

Conducting or Performance — In addition to the audition required for admission to graduate study, a doctoral student in conducting or performance is required to give a candidacy recital that is adjudged satisfactory by the area music faculty. The literature, which should reflect the breadth of styles appropriate to the given performance medium, may include part or all of that learned for some other performance (e.g., a master’s recital) or it may include works from the applicant’s performing repertory. A doctoral candidacy recital judged unsatisfactory by a student’s area faculty may be repeated once. The repeated recital may contain any or all of the contents of the unsatisfactory program. If two doctoral candidacy recitals are judged unsatisfactory, the student will not be permitted to continue in the degree program. 

For students who are completing their master’s work at the University of South Carolina and who have otherwise been admitted to doctoral studies, the master’s recital may be used for the candidacy recital if approved in advance; otherwise, if it includes a substantial portion of repertory from the master’s recital and not more than one calendar year has elapsed since that program was presented, the candidacy recital may be presented before the area faculty only. An applicant who has completed the master’s degree elsewhere must present a candidacy recital in public at USC; this recital, which will be presented after admittance as a doctoral degree student but before doctoral candidacy is approved, may include material learned during work on the master’s degree. 

In order to accommodate the performer/conductor whose extraordinary professional accomplishments are well documented, an area faculty may recommend in advance to the Music Graduate Committee that the student’s doctoral candidacy recital consist of the on-campus audition and a recording (video for conducting students) of a public performance given no more than three calendar years before the audition. Taken together, the audition and recorded public performance should reflect the breadth of styles appropriate to the given performance medium.     

The candidacy recital, which will not be recorded, should be approved and scheduled according to the regulations that govern degree recitals (under Dissertation Requirement see “Recitals”). The candidacy recital in conducting may be in rehearsal format or, in unusual circumstances as approved by the conducting faculty, it may consist of a video recording of a public conducting concert or recital given within eighteen months prior to the student’s first semester of doctoral-level conducting studies at USC. Students in choral conducting must also demonstrate diction proficiency in the two foreign languages not tested or passed during the admission process (see under Degree Programs). 

Piano Pedagogy — A doctoral student in piano pedagogy must pass a candidacy hearing and submit at least one research paper written since admittance as a doctoral student. The hearing, which is in addition to the audition for admission to graduate study, will consist of the following according to the approved degree track: 

1)  recital/treatise track - a thirty-minute program containing works from at least three contrasting style periods

2)  dissertation track - a fifteen-minute program from two contrasting style periods. 

The level of difficulty of music may vary for the two tracks, but a student is expected to demonstrate musical maturity. The hearing may be presented anytime after admittance but before doctoral candidacy is approved. A student completing a master’s degree in piano or piano pedagogy (performance track) at USC may petition that the master’s recital be considered as the hearing if approved in advance and if the student has otherwise been admitted to doctoral studies. 

Music Education — A doctoral student in music education must submit at least two scholarly papers that offer significant evidence of doctoral-level research and writing abilities in music education. 

Normally a student may not register for research or recital credit (MUSC 890-899, MUED 890) or complete more than the equivalent of two regular semesters of full-time work until candidacy has been approved. At the time a student is admitted to doctoral candidacy, the Music Graduate Committee may require specific courses to be included in the candidate’s program of study and possibly also additional teaching/professional experience prior to either the final recital or the Oral Dissertation Examination.

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CHAMBER MUSIC 

Experience in chamber music is integral to the development of important skills and knowledge for certain musicians. Performance majors in percussion, strings, or winds are therefore required to enroll in and satisfactorily complete at least two semesters of chamber music (MUSC 735), and piano majors are required to complete at least one semester. Chamber music is considered music written for an unconducted ensemble (3 to 9 musicians), with one performer per part (examples: string quartets by Mozart or Beethoven; wind quintets by Reicha or Nielsen).

COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATION IN COMPOSITION

At least sixty days before the desired date of graduation, all doctoral candidates must satisfactorily pass both written and oral comprehensive examinations. Prerequisite to taking the exams are the following: 1) admission to doctoral candidacy; 2) completion of all coursework except for the dissertation requirement; and 3) satisfaction of the foreign language requirement or completion of an advisor-approved research course. Both the written and oral comprehensive examinations must be passed before the student may begin work on the dissertation requirement.

The Comprehensive Examination is divided into a written examination and an oral examination as defined below. The written component must be taken first and is followed by the related oral component no later than one month thereafter. Scheduling of the exams must be done through the Music Graduate Office.

Written Examination - The written examination lasts four days. Days One and Two involve a take-home exam consisting of: 1) a small composition for specified forces; and 2) an orchestration exercise. Students have up to 48 hours to complete this portion of the examination. The Day Three and Day Four examinations take place on campus. Day Three will include exercises and/or problems in any or all of the following areas: counterpoint, orchestration, tonal harmony, and post-tonal analysis. Day Four will cover music history, other questions in the areas of composition and theory, and the doctoral minor. Students have up to 8 hours per day to complete the Day Three and Four examinations. Questions may pertain to any period in western music history before 1900, but will focus on 20th-century and 21st-century composition, history, literature (including score identification), and theory. The history and music theory examinations may last up to two hours each, and the doctoral minor question may last up to three hours. The committee chair will solicit questions from committee members and assemble the examination into the multiple-day format described above. The committee member representing the doctoral minor will contribute the doctoral minor question(s).

Oral Comprehensive Examination - The Oral Examination, which may last up to two hours, begins with questions referring to material covered in the Written Comprehensive Examination. The examination then proceeds to questions about 3 composers and 12 compositions selected by the candidate. About 12 months prior to taking the Written Comprehensive Examination, the candidate, in consultation with the committee chair, chooses 3 composers and 12 compositions to focus on intensely. The 3 composers should be major 20th or 21st-century figures about whom the student knows a great deal. This familiarity should include in-depth analysis and history of all their major works as well as any scholarly and analytical literature about them and their music. The 12 compositions must be chosen as follows: four pieces before 1900 (drawn from a range of periods, Medieval to late 19th century), four pieces spanning the period from 1900 to 1960, and four pieces from 1960 to the present. For each work, the candidate should be able to provide a detailed and thorough analysis, citing the work's historical importance as well as its place in a broader social/historical context and any important scholarly or analytical literature written about the work. In addition, the student should be able to relate the compositions to each other.

COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATION IN CONDUCTING AND PERFORMANCE

At least sixty days before the desired date of graduation, all doctoral candidates must satisfactorily pass both written and oral comprehensive examinations. Prerequisite to taking the exams are the following: 1) admission to doctoral candidacy; 2) completion of all coursework except for recital or research credit; and 3) satisfaction of the foreign language requirement. Both the written and oral portions of the Comprehensive Examination are to be taken during one five-day examination period. If any portion of a written or oral examination is failed, it may be retaken only once unless an exception is approved by the Music Graduate Committee. All portions of the Comprehensive Examination must be passed without provision for additional work or testing. The request for scheduling the examination should be submitted through the Music Graduate Office at least 60 days in advance of the requested examination date by way of this downloadable form

Written Examinations — Doctoral candidates are required to take three written examinations in the major area as well as one in each minor area. Each examination will normally take at least three hours to complete. For the major area, guidelines for the Written Candidacy Examination pertain also to the Written Comprehensive Examination except that the level of expertise and knowledge is expected to be considerably beyond that expected of a master’s student (conducting, performance, and piano pedagogy majors, for example, should now have developed broad and in-depth rather than functional knowledge in their major area. DMA-Composition majors should consult information available on-line at www.music.sc.edu/composition. Expectations for a minor area are equivalent to those for a major in that area at the master’s level. 

Oral Comprehensive Examination — The Examination, which may last up to two hours, may refer to material covered in the Written Comprehensive Examination or it may explore new areas. While focusing on the major area, the exam will also include questions dealing with music history/literature and score analysis/identification (especially in the context of the major area) as well as with each minor area. The   candidate must pass all portions of the Oral Comprehensive Examination (major area, music history/literature, score analysis and identification, minor areas).

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COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATION IN MUSIC EDUCATION 

At least sixty days before the desired date of graduation, all doctoral candidates in music education must satisfactorily pass both written and oral comprehensive examinations. Prerequisites to taking the exams are the following: 1) admission to doctoral candidacy; 2) completion of all coursework except for recital or research credit; and 3) satisfaction of the foreign language requirement. If any portion of a written or oral examination is failed, it may be retaken only once unless an exception is approved by the Music Graduate Committee. All portions of the Comprehensive Examination must be passed without provision for additional work or testing. The examination is scheduled through the Music Graduate Office. 

The committee for the comprehensive examination must comprise no fewer than four members, with at least one from outside music education. The Ph.D. candidate will select his/her four-member comprehensive exam committee and a three-week written exam period with the assistance of his/her advisor. If the candidate has elected to have a minor area, there must be a faculty member from that area on the committee, and the exam period may extend four weeks. 

Each of the three major area professors will submit researchable questions to the advisor. If a minor exists, the designated faculty member may submit 1) a researchable question or 2) a three-hour written exam. The advisor will compile and forward the questions to the administrative assistant in the Graduate Music Studies Office. The committee will establish the deadline for exam completion before the questions are given to the candidate. 

At the conclusion of the three week (or four weeks, if a minor area is tested) exam period, the Ph.D. candidate will submit a copy of the three (or four) papers, collated and spiral bound, to the music graduate studies office. The designated minor faculty member will be responsible only for assessing the minor portion of the exam. 

Each paper must contain a title page and references. The candidate must state the style manual used for each paper on the title page of each paper. The response for each question should be approximately 20 pages, but not more than 30 pages, including the title page, figures, tables and reference list. 

The oral examination will be scheduled no less than two and not more than three weeks after the submission of the written comprehensive exam papers to the committee. Oral exam questions may include material not included in the written exam, but pertinent to the student’s program of study.

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COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATION IN PIANO PERFORMANCE AND PIANO PEDAGOGY

 At least sixty days before the desired date of graduation, all doctoral candidates must satisfactorily pass both written and oral comprehensive examinations. Prerequisite to taking the exams are the following: 1) admission to doctoral candidacy; 2) completion of all coursework except for recital or research credit; and 3) satisfaction of the foreign language requirement. The written portions of the Comprehensive Examination are to be taken during one four-day examination period. Three hours will be allotted for each examination.  The oral portion of the Comprehensive Examination must be scheduled within one week following completion of the written portions of the Comprehensive Examination.  If any portion of a written or oral examination is failed, it may be retaken only once unless an exception is approved by the Music Graduate Committee. All portions of the Comprehensive Examination must be passed without provision for additional work or testing. The request for scheduling the examination should be submitted through the Music Graduate Office at least 60 days in advance of the requested examination date. 

The committee for the comprehensive examination in piano performance must comprise no fewer than five members – three members from the piano faculty and one each from music history and music theory.  The committee for the comprehensive examination in piano pedagogy must comprise no fewer than five members – two members from the piano pedagogy faculty, one additional member of the piano faculty, and one each from music history and music theory.  If the candidate has elected to have a minor area, there must be a faculty member from that area on the committee.

Written Examinations — The comprehensive examination in piano performance will consist of four written examinations – one each in piano literature, music history, music theory, and a piano literature score identification examination. The comprehensive examination in piano pedagogy will consist of four written examinations – one each in piano pedagogy, music history, music theory, and a written piano literature examination including a piano literature score identification examination.  Prior to the scheduling of the written portions of the Comprehensive Examination, students are encouraged to contact the members of their committee to determine subject areas of study.  Brief study guides are available from the Coordinator of the Piano Area. 

Piano Literature Score Identification Examination – Students are required to pass the Piano Literature Score Identification Examination with a minimum score of 75%.  A complete listing of piano literature examples contained in the Piano Score Identification Examination is available from the Piano Area Coordinator.   Students are encouraged to begin study for this portion of the Comprehensive Examination upon full admission to the degree program.  In addition, the piano literature score identification portion of the Doctoral Comprehensive Examination will contain three one-page excerpts from solo piano works not on this list.  Students are expected to suggest a composer and style period for each based on an analysis of these excerpts, and to provide written commentary justifying their answers. 

Oral Comprehensive Examination — The Oral Examination, which may last up to two hours, will refer to material covered in the Written Comprehensive Examinations and may explore new areas.  The exam may also include additional questions on subjects concerning piano literature or piano pedagogy (as applicable), music history/literature, music theory, and score analysis/identification (especially in the context of the major area) as well as questions in the minor area. The candidate must pass all portions of the Oral Comprehensive Examination (major area, music history, music theory, piano literature score identification examination, and minor area).

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DISSERTATION IN MUSIC EDUCATION

No later than five years after completion of the Comprehensive Examination, a PhD candidate in music education must present a dissertation that has been approved by the student’s dissertation committee, the Dean of the School of Music, and the Dean of the Graduate School. The dissertation should demonstrate a level of scholarship appropriate for the doctoral level. Guidelines for preparing both the prospectus and the actual dissertation are available on-line.  Because some members of the dissertation committee may not be available, the student should first consult the Music Graduate Director before planning to submit a prospectus or dissertation during the summer months. 

Prospectus — Prerequisite to submitting a dissertation prospectus are the following: 1) appointment of the dissertation committee; 2) completion of at least one semester of statistics; and 3) completion of MUED 890.  With the help of the project’s director, the candidate must prepare a prospectus for approval by the student’s dissertation committee.  Once the prospectus has been successfully defended and approved by the committee and the Music Graduate Director, a corrected copy of the prospectus is to be filed in the Music Graduate Office within one month of approval. The prospectus should include a clear statement of the purpose(s) of the study, an outline of chapter headings or their equivalents, specific procedures and methods to be followed, and a basic bibliography. 

Dissertation — When the project’s director has fully approved the dissertation, the student will submit a copy to each committee member. The director will collect the corrections and suggestions from the committee members and give them to the student for preparation of a revised copy. Upon the approval of the project’s director and no fewer than seven weeks before the degree is to be conferred, the student will submit a list of available dates for the oral defense examination to the Music Graduate Office. The dissertation examination (defense) and the format check by the USC Graduate School should occur no later than 30 days before the degree is to be conferred.  After making all necessary changes resulting from the oral dissertation examination or the format check, the student should submit the correction (marked) copy as well as one copy of the correct version of the research project to the Music Graduate Office for final approval by the dissertation committee and the Dean of Music. The document must be submitted electronically through the USC Graduate School Office at least 20 days prior to the end of the semester.  Pertinent deadlines are posted on the USC Graduate School website.

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DMA DISSERTATION REQUIREMENT

The dissertation requirement for the Doctor of Musical Arts degree varies according to the area of emphasis. Candidates in composition should consult information available on-line. Candidates in conducting or performance must present four public recitals in the major area as well as submit a research document. With prior approval of the piano faculty, candidates in piano pedagogy have two options: 1) the presentation of two public recitals and the submission of a research treatise; or 2) the submission of a research dissertation. Any student who wishes to use University facilities or submit a doctoral research project must be officially enrolled, and those who wish to confer with the faculty on research or composition work must be officially enrolled for research credit (MUSC 897, 898, 899). All portions of the dissertation requirement must have been completed and approved by the student’s doctoral committee, the Dean of the Music School, and the Dean of the Graduate School no later than five years after completion of the Comprehensive Examination. Because some members of the doctoral committee may not be available, the student should first consult the Music Graduate Director before planning to schedule a recital or submit a prospectus or research project during the summer months. 

Composition — See information available on-line. 

DMA Research Project — The DMA research project (document, treatise, dissertation) should demonstrate scholarly research, organization, and presentation appropriate for the doctoral level. All doctoral research projects are approved by the student’s dissertation or research committee, the Dean of the School of Music, and the Dean of the Graduate School. Guidelines for preparing both the prospectus and the research project are available on-line. 

Prospectus — After the appointment of the dissertation or research committee, the candidate must prepare, with the help of the project’s director, a prospectus for approval by the student’s dissertation/research committee and the Music Graduate Director.  A corrected copy of the prospectus is to be filed in that office within one month of approval. The prospectus should include a clear statement of the purpose(s) of the study, an outline of chapter headings or their equivalents, specific procedures and methods to be followed, and a basic bibliography. 

Research Project — When the project’s director has fully approved the research project, the student will submit a copy to each committee member. The director will collect the corrections and suggestions from the committee members and give them to the student for preparation of a revised copy. Upon the approval of the project’s director and no fewer than seven weeks before the degree is to be conferred, the student will submit a list of available dates for the oral defense examination to the Music Graduate Office. The dissertation examination (defense) and the format check by the USC Graduate School should occur no later than 30 days before the degree is to be conferred.  After making all necessary changes resulting from the oral dissertation examination or the format check, the student should submit the correction (marked) copy as well as one copy of the correct version of the research project to the Music Graduate Office for final approval by the dissertation committee and the Dean of Music. The document must be submitted electronically through the USC Graduate School Office at least 20 days prior to the end of the semester.  Pertinent deadlines are posted on the USC Graduate School website. 

Recitals — The student should submit a typed recital prospectus to his or her major professor, who will see that it is signed by each member of the area faculty and properly submitted to the Music Graduate Office as early as possible but no later than three weeks before the scheduled performance. The prospectus will include a listing of the works to be performed with the approximate duration of each work listed.  Guidelines for preparing the recital prospectus are available in room 101K or online.  The prospectus for a lecture-recital should include a detailed outline of the proposed lecture as well as time estimates for both the lecture and the performance. All recitals (including those presented off campus) must be scheduled through the Music Office and should be presented when classes are officially in session. Because some members of the Recital Committee may not be available, a student should first consult the Music Graduate Director before submitting a recital prospectus or planning to schedule a recital for presentation during the summer months. A student must be officially enrolled during the term in which a graduate degree recital is presented. A copy of each degree recital program is to be bound with the doctoral research project. Each degree recital is to be recorded and a copy archived in the Music Library (a video recording is required of each conducting recital). 

Doctoral degree recitals are adjudicated by the student’s major professor and at least two other members of the area faculty. The literature performed on a doctoral recital is to be learned specifically for that performance. Lecture, chamber music, and solo recitals should be between 50 and 65 minutes in length. A doctoral student may not register for either recital preparation or recital credit nor present a degree recital until admitted to doctoral candidacy. No degree recital may be presented unless the student has officially enrolled in recital credit. In order to receive applied lessons, a student must be enrolled in either applied or recital-preparation credit. 

A doctoral recital judged unsatisfactory by a student’s dissertation committee may be repeated once. The repeated recital may contain any or all of the contents of the unsatisfactory program. If two doctoral recitals (including a repeated recital) are judged unsatisfactory, the student’s status as a doctoral candidate will be terminated. 

For the DMA in conducting or performance, the following pertain: 

  • Three of the four degree recitals must be solo recitals (MUSC 896). The other recital is to be a lecture, concerto, or chamber music recital, or a major opera role (see below).
  • For conducting majors, one of the solo recitals may be in rehearsal format, with the following stipulations: 1) the rehearsal recital is to consist of a rehearsal period or periods totaling approximately 11/4 hours in length; and 2) the literature learned (but not necessarily rehearsed) is to comprise a concert program of approximately 11/4 hours in length.  With the approval of the conducting faculty, up to two solo recitals may consist of the combination of works conducted with University ensembles over the course of three Fall or Spring semesters.  If a conducting recital is to be given outside the Columbia metropolitan area, the candidate will be expected to pay all expenses of the Recital Committee. If distance from campus is a factor, the student may submit two video recordings (one of a rehearsal and the other of the performance) to the Music Graduate Office for consideration by the conducting faculty; one member of the student’s recital committee should be present for one of the video-tapings. 
  • Lecture Recital (MUSC 892) - A lecture recital should demonstrate the candidate’s ability to communicate to an audience in-depth understanding, based on research, of some facet of the literature, performance, or pedagogy of the major area. Consequently, the amount of performance time included is not specified, the principal consideration being that performance should illustrate the content of the lecture. The entire presentation, however, should be between 50 and 75 minutes in length. At the end of the presentation the candidate may be questioned by committee members or by other members of the audience. The subject of the lecture recital may be related to some aspect of the candidate’s research project, but the latter will be substantially larger in scope. 
  • Opera/Oratorio Role (MUSC 893) - An approved opera role, which is to be presented and adjudicated in a public performance, must be considered a major (not supporting) role in a fully mounted opera.  An approved oratorio (or mass) must be performed in a professional setting that uses chorus and orchestra, and must be of sufficient length and difficulty to equal aspects of either a full-length solo recital or a major opera role. With the approval of the Music Graduate Committee, the opera or oratorio role may be presented outside the Columbia metropolitan area if at least three members of the area faculty are present or if the performance is recorded and one member of the area faculty is present (a video recording is required for an opera performance and an audio recording of an oratorio presentation). 
  •  Concerto Recital (MUSC 894) - The work chosen for the concerto recital is to be performed in its entirety and should come from the standard concerto repertory of the student’s performance medium. Public performance with an orchestra (or the appropriate original “accompanying” instrumentation) is required. With the permission of the Music Graduate Committee, the concerto recital may be presented outside the Columbia metropolitan area if at least three members of the area faculty are present or if the performance is video recorded (one member of the area faculty should be present for the video recording). 
  • Chamber music Recital (MUSC 895) - The works should be chosen from the standard chamber music repertory of the student’s performance medium, though one recently composed work that may not have become a “standard” repertory item may be included. 
  •  Final recital - All final recitals are to be given within the Columbia metropolitan area. 

For the DMA in Piano Pedagogy (performance track), one of the recitals may consist of a concerto, chamber music, or lecture recital (see above under recital comments for the DMA in performance).

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DOCTORAL COMMITTEE(S)

Immediately after a doctoral student has been admitted to candidacy, the Music Graduate Director in consultation with the student and the student’s advisor will appoint a doctoral committee that will oversee the student’s doctoral work. This committee will include three professors (including the major professor) from the major area and one professor each from music history and music theory. The candidate’s advisor, the Graduate Music Director, and the School of Music Dean are ex officio members of a student’s doctoral committee but may also be regular members. The committee will advise and guide the candidate’s work and program as well as administer the Comprehensive and Oral Dissertation examinations. Should a student elect to incorporate a doctoral minor or a significant course of study from outside the School of Music, an additional committee member from that area will be appointed to advise the student’s program of study and participate in the Oral Comprehensive Examination. Before a candidate submits a composition or research prospectus, the Music Graduate Director in consultation with the student and his or her advisor will select four members of the doctoral committee to read the doctoral research project. This dissertation or research committee will include the director of the project, two members of the area faculty (three if the director is not from the area), and one music faculty member from outside the major area (for students who will write a dissertation, a professor from outside the School of Music will be appointed to replace one of the music professors). If the subject of a research project requires the direction of a faculty member not on a student’s doctoral committee, the Music Graduate Director will replace one of the professors with a suitable director. At least three members of the area faculty will adjudicate a doctoral recital.

ENSEMBLE

DMA students majoring in conducting, percussion, strings, or winds are required to satisfactorily complete at least two semesters in an appropriate ensemble (MUSC 734).

FOREIGN LANGUAGE

Examination can be scheduled. If a research project (document, treatise, dissertation) is to involve significant research in another foreign language, a doctoral student may petition the Music Graduate Committee for substitution of the desired language. The foreign language reading-proficiency requirement may be satisfied by earning a grade of "S" in a foreign language 615 reading course or by successfully completing an examination given by the appropriate USC foreign language faculty.

Students in all other DMA programs may choose to satisfy the foreign language requirements as stated above or they may complete an advisor-approved research course (e.g., MUED 795--Research in Music Education and Pedagogy, MUSC 749--Research Methods, etc) in addition to MUSC 747--Advanced Music Research. With the approval of the Music Graduate Director and the Dean of the Graduate School, English may be accepted as a foreign language for students whose native language is not English.

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JURY PERFORMANCES

Students taking applied music at the 511 or 711 level must complete a performance jury at the end of each regular academic semester (fall, spring). A jury exam is not necessary for a conducting, performance, or piano-pedagogy major who has enrolled in doctoral-level applied or conducting study (MUSC 811); should circumstances warrant, however, a jury exam may be required by the student’s major professor.

MAXIMUM PERIOD ALLOWED

All work to be applied toward a doctoral degree, exclusive of the master’s degree portion, must be completed within eight years prior to graduation. Should more time be needed to complete a degree program, special arrangements may be made with the Graduate School for the revalidation of outdated credits in courses given by the University, if approved by the Music Graduate Director (see the current Graduate Studies Bulletin for information concerning the revalidation fee). For revalidation of USC courses, the student must demonstrate a contemporary knowledge of the course content by passing an examination administered by a music faculty member who currently teaches the course. Outdated transfer courses cannot be revalidated. Any student who fails to complete the program within eight years becomes subject to changes in degree requirements adopted up to a date eight years prior to graduation.

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ORAL DISSERTATION EXAMINATION (defense)

Each doctoral candidate must successfully defend a dissertation or document before the appointed doctoral committee. For candidates in conducting, performance, or piano pedagogy (recital track), this may also include questions concerning any historical, stylistic, or technical aspect of the works performed in recital. The examination, which will be arranged through the Music Graduate Office, may not be scheduled until the Comprehensive Examination and all recitals have been completed. The Oral Dissertation Examination must be passed at least 30 days before the date at which the candidate expects to receive the degree. The document must be submitted electronically through the USC Graduate School Office at least 20 days prior to the end of the semester.  Pertinent deadlines are posted on the USC Graduate School website.

PROGRAM OF STUDY

Within the first 24 months of matriculation, all doctoral students must submit to the Music Graduate Director a Program of Study proposal that has been approved by the student’s academic advisor. The Program of Study form is currently located at http://gradschool.sc.edu/doclibrary/documents/doctoralprogramofstudy.pdf.

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RESIDENCY

Both the DMA and the PhD require a minimum of 48 credits beyond the master’s degree and the successful completion of an approved program of graduate-level study. For all doctoral students except those in composition, 18 of these credits must be completed in residence on the Columbia campus within a span of three consecutive regular semesters, with a least one semester being spent in full-time study (at least nine credits per semester for regular students and six for graduate assistants). DMA-Composition students should consult information regarding the degree requirements. Enrollment in a summer term is not required to maintain continuity, but credits earned during summer terms may be counted toward residency. In addition, the final 36 credits of doctoral work (including 30 credits taken after admission to the doctoral program and all credit for the dissertation or dissertation requirement) must be taken on the Columbia campus.

The intent of doctoral residency is to ensure that doctoral students benefit from and contribute to the complete spectrum of educational and professional opportunities provided by the graduate faculty of a comprehensive university. When establishing residency, the student should interact with faculty and peers by regularly attending courses, conferences, and seminars, and utilize the library facilities and resources needed to support excellence in graduate education. DMA and PhD students should therefore expect to spend at least four days per week on campus while fulfilling the full-time portion of doctoral residency. The doctoral residency requirement can be fulfilled only while the student is pursuing courses toward a doctoral degree. Residency completed while earning the master’s degree cannot be used to fulfill the requirement.

VOTING PROCEDURES FOR DOCTORAL RECITALS AND EXAMINATIONS

Voting on all graduate recitals (including the doctoral candidacy hearing/recital) and examinations (oral and written) will employ written ballots. A two-thirds (2/3, 66.7%) majority positive vote of the examining committee is required to pass a recital or examination. A “no” vote must be accompanied by a written justification (courteous wording is expected). If not passed on the first attempt, a recital or examination (or a portion of the exam) may be repeated once.  There is no provision for appeal if a student fails a candidacy recital twice, fails a written candidacy examination twice, or fails any two dissertation recitals.  The student will be dismissed from the degree program in these cases. 

Doctoral Candidacy Recitals and Hearings - The Music Graduate Director will distribute a ballot to each member of the area faculty before the event. The ballot will be marked, signed and returned to the Graduate Director within 24 hours of the event.Each ballot must have written qualitative judgments concerning the student’s abilities to pursue the desired doctoral program as well as the pass/fail vote. Discussion may precede voting. Upon receipt of all ballots, the Graduate Director will inform the student and the major professor of the results of the voting, but individual votes will not be revealed. 

Degree Recitals - The Music Graduate Director will distribute a ballot to each member of the area faculty before the recital. The ballot will be marked, signed and returned to the Graduate Director within 24 hours of the recital.After all ballots have been returned, the student and the major professor will be informed of the results. Discussion may precede voting, and individual votes may be revealed to the major professor after voting has concluded.

Written Examinations

Doctoral Candidacy Examination - The coordinator of a student’s major area (or major professor for conducting, brass, percussion, and woodwind students) will be responsible for the compilation of the examination. After reading the examination, the area faculty will meet to discuss the results of the examination. The coordinator of area will poll the faculty, complete the “Report Form for the Written Doctoral Candidacy Examination,” and return all materials to the Music Graduate Director in a timely manner. The Music Graduate Director  will inform the student and The Graduate School of the results of the examination. 

Doctoral Comprehensive Examination - Prepared by the student’s doctoral committee (which may be augmented to include faculty from a minor area not otherwise represented), this examination covers the student’s major area as well as any minor areas. The examination in the major area will be given in three 3-hour segments, and those in the minor areas will be given in separate 3-hour periods. Each committee member will receive a copy of the pertinent examination (i.e., each area faculty will receive a copy of each major-area exam, and faculty representing a minor area will receive a copy of the exam for that area). A copy of each examination will be available in the Music Graduate Office for the perusal of all committee members. Voting will take place at the conclusion of the oral comprehensive examination. Committee discussion of the written exam(s) may precede the student’s oral comprehensive exam. The oral comprehensive examination is normally given one or two days following the completion of the written comprehensive exam(s). 

Oral Examinations - All graduate oral examinations are to be chaired by the student’s major professor. Ballots for the comprehensive examination will be available at the conclusion of the oral examination, and discussion may precede voting. The student will be informed of the results (but not the precise spread) of the vote.  If a faculty member is not present for the entire oral examination, that faculty member should not cast a vote on the portions of the questioning that were not observed.

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DOCTORAL DEGREE FLOW CHART

ADMISSION TO DEGREE PROGRAM
USC GRADUATE SCHOOL PROGRAM OF STUDY
(submit within first twenty four months of matriculation)
DEGREE CANDIDACY
(students must spend one year in degree candidacy before graduation)
FOREIGN LANGUAGE
(requirement to be met before taking Comprehensive Exams)
RECITALS
(DMA-conducting, DMA-performance, and DMA-piano pedagogy/recital track)
WRITTEN AND ORAL COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATIONS
(after completion of the foreign language requirement and all coursework except for recital and research credit)
DISSERTATION RESEARCH PROJECT
(document and composition for DMA composition; document for DMA conducting and DMA performance; treatise or dissertation for DMA piano pedagogy; dissertation for Ph.D music education)
ORAL DISSERTATION EXAMINATION (DEFENSE)
Application for graduation should be made early in the semester.

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OTHER INFORMATION FOR STUDENTS


ACADEMIC RESPONSIBILITY 

It is the responsibility of every student at the University of South Carolina to adhere steadfastly to truthfulness and to avoid dishonesty, fraud, or deceit of any type in connection with any academic program.  Any student who violates this rule or who knowingly assists another to violate this rule shall be subject to discipline.  For more information, please see the Carolina Community, the student handbook and policy guide of the University of South Carolina.

CENTERS, INSTITUTES AND OTHER PROGRAMS

Housed in the USC Music Library, the Center for Southern African-American Music (CSAM) is developing three component parts: an Archive, Curriculum Initiatives, and an Educational Outreach Program.  For more information, please contact Ms. Ana Dubnjakovic, Music Librarian.

The Children’s Music Development Center provides an environment for research into the development of music skills in young children. For further information contact Dr. Wendy Valerio (wvalerio@mozart.sc.edu), USC Children’s Music Development Center (www.music.sc.edu under “Community Programs”), School of Music, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208.

Nationally renowned for its unique educational and training experiences, The Conductors Institute offers intermediate and advanced orchestral conductors the opportunity to work with gifted conducting teachers and to study a variety of orchestral compositions. During a four-week period in June and July, conductors work with an Institute ensemble under the guidance of resident and guest conducting faculty. Participants also are able to work with a composer-in-residence (recent composers include Stephen Paulus, Samuel Jones, and Robert Ward).  For further information, contact Dr. Donald Portnoy, The Conductors Institute, School of Music, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208 (email: ci@mozart.sc.edu; Internet: www.music.sc.edu under “Centers and Institutes”).

During the regular academic year the School of Music sponsors the Community Music Program, a pre-college program that provides quality private instruction in the following areas: 

Flute Saxophone Baritone Classical Guitar
Oboe Trumpet Euphonium Strings
Clarinet Horn Tuba Piano
Bassoon Trombone Percussion Voice

Interested graduate students may have an opportunity to teach in the program. For further information, contact your applied teacher or Dr. Tina Stallard (email: tstallard@mozart.sc.edu), USC Community Music Program, School of Music, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208.

The USC String Project is a unique program that offers qualified graduate students an opportunity to receive experience in the teaching of musicianship, private lessons, heterogeneous string classes, and ensembles. For further information contact Dr. Gail Barnes (email: gbarnes@mozart.sc.edu), USC String Project (Internet: www.music.sc.edu under “Community Programs”), School of Music, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208.

DISMISSAL FROM A GRADUATE PROGRAM 

Upon the recommendation of the area faculty and with the approval of the Music Graduate Committee, a music graduate student may be dismissed either from a graduate program or from degree candidacy if the student’s work in the major area is not meeting the expectations of the School of Music. The Music Graduate Director will inform the student in writing of the decision and will enumerate the reasons for dismissal. The student may appeal the dismissal to the Music Graduate Committee.  In the case of dismissal because of two failed candidacy recitals or two failed dissertation recitals there is no provision for appeal.

FEES (School of Music)

Applied Music Fee:  All students who register for applied music lessons (including conducting and composition) will be assessed a Music Enrichment Fee.  The fee for a 1/2 hour (1-credit) lesson will be equal to 50% of the tuition charge for one undergraduate  resident credit  ($240 in Fall 2013 semester).  The fee for a one hour (2-4 credit) lesson will be equal to 100% of  the tuition charge for one undergraduate  resident credit ($480 in Fall 2009 semester). 

Recital Fee:  Before a recital can be scheduled, the recital fee of $100 must be paid to Ms. Laveta Gibson in the Music Office.  All necessary forms and materials, including information about recording services, are available from Ms. Gibson.

Accompanying Fee: All students who use a School of Music accompanist in the presentation of a recital will be assessed a fee of  $150.  Requests for a School of Music accompanist are made through the applied teacher.

FINANCIAL AID 

Graduate assistantships are available in a variety of areas in the School of Music (see the School of Music assistantship application for more specific information). Assistantship duties require up to 20 hours per week, and stipends range from $2,400 to $6,600 per academic year. Graduate assistants pay academic fees at in-state rates and may also other tuition assistance.  An applicant must have been admitted by the Graduate School as a degree student before a graduate assistantship position can be offered. Applications received after March 7 will be considered as vacancies occur. The School of Music does not usually offer graduate assistantships during the summer months.  The application form may be downloaded here.

Graduate Fellowships:  At the present time the School of Music offers one significant graduate fellowship: The Carroll Taussig Fellowship in Opera. Smaller fellowships may be available from the various areas within the School.  

Loans (both need based and non-need based) are available each semester to students making satisfactory academic progress. For further information contact the Office of Student Financial Aid and Scholarships, 1714 College St., Columbia, SC 29208 (803/777-8134; www.sc.edu/financialaid/; email: uscfaid@gwm.sc.edu).

Part-time Work:  The federal College Work-Study Program is available to students who demonstrate financial need and who desire employment to meet their educational expenses. Employment as a “student assistant” under this program is compensated at an hourly wage. Also available is off-campus, part-time employment. For further information contact the Office of Student Financial Aid and Scholarships (see under “Loans”).

Veterans Services:  For information about veterans benefits, contact the University Office of Veterans Services, Russell House Suite 316, USC, Columbia, SC 29208 (803/777-5156; www.sa.sc.edu/veterans email: veterans@gwm.sc.edu).


FULL-TIME STUDY 

Nine to twelve credit hours of coursework (minimum of six credits for graduate assistants) constitute full-time study during a fall or spring semester; six credits constitute a full load during a five-week summer session.  Fifteen credits is the maximum load in a fall or spring semester, and seven credits is the maximum load in a summer term. 

HEALTH INSURANCE 

Student health and accident insurance is required for all international students, all graduate assistants, and all full-time graduate students (defined as students registered for nine or more credits). For further information contact the Student Health Services, Thomson Student Health Center, Columbia, SC 29208 (803/777-3175; www.sa.sc.edu/tshc/). Beginning Fall 2004 all students must show proof of health insurance before registering for classes. 

HOUSING 

The University of South Carolina maintains both on-campus and off-campus student housing offices. For further information concerning housing, contact the University Housing Services Office, 1215 Blossom Street, Columbia, SC 29208 (803/777-4283; www.housing.sc.edu; email - housing@sc.edu). Housing for graduate students is available on a limited basis.

REGISTRATION

Any graduate student who wishes to use University facilities (e.g., to present a recital or to use a University library) or to consult on research or recital work must be officially enrolled in appropriate courses.

STUDENT RESPONSIBILITIES

Although students are expected to avail themselves of faculty advisement, it is the responsibility of each student to know and follow all graduate guidelines and regulations. Any exception to graduate regulations or degree requirements must be approved in writing by the Music Graduate Director.

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INFORMATION FOR FACULTY


GRADUATE ASSISTANTSHIPS

Each January the Music Graduate Director will inform the music faculty regarding graduate assistantships for the next academic year.  Applicants are eligible for an assistantship only if they meet all admission requirements for the desired degree program and fulfill all of the eligibility criteria of the Graduate School.  GA positions cannot be offered to an individual until that individual has been admitted to a degree program. 

Graduate assistantships are normally limited to one year for graduate certificate students, two years for master’s students, and three for doctoral students. For students who earn another graduate music degree at USC, the total time accrued as a graduate assistant will normally not exceed one year more than the limits set forth above (e.g., three years for a student who has earned a graduate certificate and a master’s degree, four years for a doctoral student who has earned a master’s degree at USC).

In order to avoid misunderstandings, the offer (verbal or written) of a graduate assistantship position should be made only by the Graduate Director in consultation with the Dean.

GRADUATE CURRICULA AND COURSES

All requests for changes in music graduate curricula or courses follow the route of approval outlined below:

  • Area Coordinator
  • Music Graduate Director
  • Music Graduate Committee
  • Music Faculty
  • Appropriate University personnel/committees via the Music Graduate Director

Proposals for workshops and topics courses must be approved by the Music Graduate Director and the Music Graduate Committee.

GRADUATE FACULTY

The principal responsibilities of the Graduate Faculty are to teach graduate students effectively, to conduct scholarly research and/or engage in creative activity of high quality, and to direct the research of graduate students.  In order to fulfill these responsibilities, the Graduate Council recognizes regular and term membership in the Graduate School Faculty.  Faculty members holding the terminal degree in their respective field of study are eligible to become regular members of the Graduate School faculty upon appointment to a tenured or tenure-track position at the University's Columbia campus.  Nominations of eligible faculty for appointments to The Graduate School faculty are made by the appropriate academic unit to the Dean of The Graduate School.  Faculty members and scholars not otherwise eligible for regular membership on the Graduate School faculty may be appointed to term appointments.  Term appointments to the Graduate School Faculty are granted upon nomination by an academic unit to the Dean of The Graduate School for a period not to exceed three years. Term appointments to the Graduate School faculty confer the rights only to teach graduate courses and serve on graduate students' committees.

MUSIC GRADUATE COMMITTEE

The Graduate Committee is responsible for approving all policies and procedures relating to graduate programs, faculty, and students and for insuring that these policies and procedures are executed. In addition, the committee must approve new or revised graduate courses/programs before presentation to the Music Faculty; periodically reviews graduate programs and policies; considers matters of academic policy or discipline for graduate students; and considers other matters as deemed necessary by administrative personnel or the Music Graduate Faculty.

The Music Graduate Committee comprises nine members of the Music Graduate Faculty:

Standing members
Director of Graduate Studies (chair), Dean of the School of Music (ex officio), and graduate coordinators (or representatives) of music history, music theory, music education, and piano pedagogy

Appointed members (overlapping two-year terms)
Three music faculty from diverse areas are appointed on a rotating basis by the Dean of the School of Music in consultation with the Music Graduate Director.

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