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Paul P. Fidler Research Grant


National Resource Center announces 2013-2014 Fidler Grant Recipient

October 3, 2013

Columbia, SC -The National Resource Center for The First-Year Experience and Students in Transition named Forrest Lane, an assistant professor in the Department of Educational Studies and Research, and Georgianna Martin, an assistant professor of Student Affairs Administration/Higher Education, of the University of Southern Mississippi the recipients of the 2013 - 2014 Paul P. Fidler Research Grant. The Center will publicly acknowledge Lane and Martin during its 20th National Conference on Students in Transition, which will be held October 19 - 21, 2013 in Atlanta, Georgia.

The grant, designed to encourage and enable scholarly research on issues related to college student transitions, includes a financial stipend and travel to two national conferences. Completed research funded by the Paul P. Fidler Research Grant is featured in the Journal of The First-Year Experience and Students in Transition. Lane and Martin's study is entitled Examining the Importance of Attachment and Engagement in Predicting GPA across Stages of Transfer Student Transition. The abstract appears below:

Transfer student populations continue to grow in higher education. These students may struggle to find a sense of belonging and experience limited opportunities for engagement given work, life, and family commitments. Belonging predicts increased levels of engagement and academic success among traditional students. However, few researchers examine this theoretical model among transfer students, limiting its generalizability. To bridge this gap, we propose to use a multi-group path analysis to test the relationship between belonging (i.e., university attachment), engagement, and academic success among entering and persisting transfer students. Results may guide practitioners in the prioritization of outcomes for transfer student programs.

In its ninth year, the Paul P. Fidler Research Grant has become a well-respected and highly competitive grant program. The Center received many strong proposals from researchers and practitioners throughout the United States. The four other outstanding research projects selected as finalists were:

  • Diane Oliver, Kimberly Cole, Jennifer Whyte of California State University, Fresno, Christina Enquist of the College of the Sequoias, Monica Nolasco of the State Center Community College District and their study entitled Student Veteran Transfer from Community Colleges to Universities: Building Bridges.

  • Sara Connolly of the University of Bridgeport and her study entitled The relationship between self-efficacy and locus of control: Can interventions change students’ confidence?

  • Katie Lowe of Purdue University and her study entitled Parental Involvement during the College Transition: Trajectories and Associations with Academic Success, Well-Being, and Individuation.

  • Loni Bordoloi Pazich of New York University and her study entitled Influencing Transfer and Baccalaureate Attainment for Community College Students through State Grant Incentives: Quasi-Experimental Evidence from Texas

Dallin George Young, Assistant Director of Research, Grants, and Assessment at the National Resource Center for The First-Year Experience and Students in Transition, led the Paul P. Fidler Research Grant selection process. He anticipates Lane and Martin's research will significantly contribute to the national discussion on understanding the factors that support transfer student success.

"The study that will be carried out by Drs. Lane and Martin is important as it will test widely held assumptions that institutional attachment, or sense of belonging, is an important antecedent to academic success for transfer students. The results of this research will help faculty and staff understand how to better support transfer students who may have difficulties finding a sense of belonging in their new institutional environments. Understanding the roles of attachment and engagement in transfer student success will give higher education professionals tools to help support the large number of these students in American higher education."

Past recipients of the grant include:

  • 2012-2013 -Jacob Okumu - Developmental Meaning-Making Dynamics of Emancipated Foster Care Youth Transitioning into Higher Education: A Constructivist-Grounded Theory

  • 2011-2012 - Kristin Moser, Redefining Transfer Student Success: Transfer Capital and the Laanan-Transfer Students' Questionnaire (L-TSQ) Revisited
  • 2010-2011 - Paul J. McLoughlin II, High-Achieving Low-Income Students: How Low-Income Students on Full Financial Aid are Navigating an Elite College Environment

  • 2009-2010 - Rachel Smith of Syracuse University, Connected in Learning: A Mixed Methods Study of First-year Students' Academic and Social Networks
  • 2008-2009 - Maryellen Mills of the University of Texas at Austin, Student Success Course Participation and Engagement among Part-time and Full-Time Community College Students

  • 2007-2008 - Dr. Eunyoung Kim of Seton Hall University, Acculturation Experiences and College Transitions of Minority Immigrant Students

  • 2006-2007 - Dr. Barbara Hofer of Middlebury College, The Electronic Tether: Parental Regulation, Self-Regulation, and the Role of Technology in College Transitions

  • 2005-2006 - Christine and Michael Kirk-Kuwaye of the University of Hawai'i at Manoa, A Study of Engagement Patterns of Lateral and Vertical Transfer Students During their First Semester at a Public Research University

 

 
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