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Questions

If you have any questions about the content or organization of this event, contact Nina L. Glisson at (803) 777-8158 or ninal@mailbox.sc.edu

For registration questions please contact Jennie Duval at (803)777-3799 or jlduval@mailbox.sc.edu.

Information about this Conference and other events sponsored by the Center can be found at www.sc.edu/fye.

 

Preconference Workshops

(Continental breakfast and lunch provided for all workshop participants)

These workshops offer extended presentation, discussion, and interaction on a particular topic or area of interest.

 


W-1
Upgrade Your Peer Leader Program by Creating High-Impact and Transformative Experiences
February 10, 2018
8:00 am - 12:00 noon
$135

Bryce Bunting, Assistant Clinical Professor - Brigham Young University; Dallin George Young, Assistant Director for Research, Grants, and Assessment - National Resource Center for The First-Year Experience and Students in Transition

Peer leadership is emerging as a high-impact practice (HIP) with transformative potential for students who serve as peer leaders (PLs). This workshop will support attendees in designing PL experiences that align with the characteristics of other well-known HIPs (Kuh, 2010) and that facilitate meaningful learning for student leaders. Participants will be introduced to research on PL learning outcomes, explore relevant theoretical frameworks, evaluate opportunities for strengthening the PL experience on their own campus, and then work collaboratively to develop theory and research- based strategies for improving the high-impact potential of PL experiences on their own campuses.


W-3
It Takes a Village: Initiatives and Programs to Support First-Generation and Rural College Students
February 10, 2018
8:00 am - 12:00 noon
$135


Carmen Gonzalez, Director of the Lookout Scholars Program - University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill; Sharon Levine, Counselor and Coordinator for Transition Courses - University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill

Through institutional support and grant funding, UNC-Chapel Hill has been able to offer multi-faceted programming and support that promotes student success and graduation equity among first-generation and rural students. This workshop offers an interactive overview of these initiatives and addresses steps and challenges in implementing similar practices on other campuses. Participants will assess their current support initiatives, collect strategies for implementing programming, and set goals for their institution to better serve this unique population of students.


W-4
The Changing Face of Higher Education: Adding the "O" to FYE
February 10, 2018
8:00 am - 12:00 noon
$135


Matthew Belanger, Assistant Vice President of Academic Operations & First Year Experience - Southern New Hampshire University; Jamie Holcomb, Associate Dean of Faculty - Southern New Hampshire University; Jazz Jackson, Associate Dean of First Year Experience and Retention Programs - Southern New Hampshire University

As higher education begins to develop and evolve, more students need a flexible format to accommodate the complex demands of their lives. Online learning expands the reach, access, and opportunity for students who might not be able to attend traditional college. This changes the landscape of FYE requiring a holistic institution-wide approach to support this diverse student population. Ensuring an individualized, student-centered learning experience from initial contact through the conclusion of their first year is an important component of student success. Within this workshop, we will explore the strategies used to support and develop a comprehensive online first year experience.


W-5
Critical Thinking Pedagogy in the First-Year Experience and University Transition
February 10, 2018
8:00 am - 12:00 noon
$135

Robert Kenedy, Associate Professor, Department of Sociology - York University

Current research suggests that students who acquire various critical thinking skills are more likely to successfully complete their degrees. Teaching students to become critical thinkers and writers requires a comprehensive educational approach. This workshop focuses on strategies for teaching and assessing critical thinking and writing components in FYE seminars, introductory courses, and the college transition. We will evaluate relevant research, pedagogy, and substantive handouts that promote "best practices" for teaching critical thinking and writing. This interactive workshop will help participants develop and assess critical thinking and writing pedagogy, syllabi, and work that they may bring in order to enhance.



W-6
The Magic's in the Method: Techniques for Various FYE Courses
February 10, 2018
8:00 am - 12:00 noon
$135


Tom Carskadon, Director of First-Year Experience Programs and Professor of Psychology - Mississippi State University

Across 12 different models of FYE courses over 31 years, we have identified "THINGS THAT WORK." The "magic" is not in the specific FYE course content or model, but in certain methods and materials usable in various FYE seminars, core curriculum courses (even College Algebra!), and beyond. Dozens of ideas and extensive samples are shared, including: increasing student knowledge/use of helping resources; making class fun; effective faculty-student interaction; encouraging effective writing; teaching wellness; fresh approaches to cultural literacy and cultural diversity; innovative parent contact programs; student ratings of 75 common reading books; and 250 Random Acts of Kindness Toward College Students.


W-7
A Primer on Developing, Implementing, or Re-Envisioning a First-Year Seminar
February 10, 2018
9:00 am - 4:00 pm
$235

Stephanie M. Foote, Assistant Vice President for Teaching, Learning, and Evidence-Based Practices – John N. Gardner Institute for Excellence in Undergraduate Studies; Dan Friedman, Director, University 101 Programs - University of South Carolina; Mary Stuart Hunter, Senior Fellow - National Resource Center for The First-Year Experience and Students in Transition

The proposed pre-conference workshop offers participants guidance as they develop or implement a new first-year seminar or re-envision an existing first-year seminar at their institution. Specifically, the workshop will contextualize first-year seminars by providing an introduction to the history, evolution, and characteristics of these courses, and then participants will use this information as they are introduced to a process of course design and development (see outline). Finally, participants will explore examples of best and promising practices in first-year seminar design, delivery, and evaluation that may be adapted for their use.


W-8
Best Practice in the First College Year: Defining What Works and Why
February 10, 2018
9:00 am - 4:00 pm
$235


John N. Gardner, President - John N. Gardner Institute for Excellence in Undergraduate Education; Senior Fellow, National Resource Center for The First-Year Experience and Students in Transition - University of South Carolina; Betsy O. Barefoot, Senior Scholar - John N. Gardner Institute for Excellence in Undergraduate Education; Fellow, National Resource Center for The First-Year Experience and Students in Transition - University of South Carolina

For more than three decades, a significant investment has been made by many colleges and universities to improve the first year. But funds spent have often not yielded expected returns in student learning and retention. In this workshop, the presenters will explore the questions, "What works in first-year programs and why... or why not?" They will draw from recent research findings and provide a variety of examples of best practice. Participants will be challenged to reflect on the first year at their own campuses-what initiatives have made a positive difference in the first year and what challenges remain?


W-9
Designing and Sustaining Learning Communities for First-Year Students
February 10, 2018
9:00 am - 4:00 pm
$235


Jean M. Henscheid, Clinical Faculty, Adult, Organizational Learning and Leadership, College of Education - University of Idaho

Building academically purposeful experiences around student learning community cohorts is recognized as a key strategy for improving first-year student learning, engagement, retention and success. This workshop will provide participants with the information and skills necessary to launch and sustain these programs in any campus environment. While many of the varieties of learning communities will be described, special attention will be given to multiplying benefits for students by combining learning communities with another high impact practice - the first-year seminar.


W-10
Triple Threat: Impacting Retention of Students with Multiple High Risk Factors
February 10, 2018
1:00 pm - 5:00 pm
$135

Tiffany Bellafant Steward , Director of First Year Students - Tennessee State University

Universities are challenged to support individual student identities and reform support to fit those needs. Unfortunately, little focus is placed on the cross-sectionality of identities that are barriers to matriculation. In working with students that have multiple at-risk factors, how do student affairs professionals prioritize student needs that encourage learning and retention? What trends and consequences reside on campuses with many at-risk students? How do we bridge the gap to allow for student success? These questions and more will be explored through sharing of best practices, participant engagement in brainstorming/ strategic planning, and the exploration of institutional support and structures.


W-11
Moving from Learning Styles to Research Based Learning Strategies
February 10, 2018
1:00 pm - 5:00 pm
$135


Marsha Fralick, Professor Emeritus - Cuyamaca Community College

Although empirical evidence supporting learning style theory is lacking, this concept is still common practice. Recent surveys of the literature on learning style will be reviewed with opportunity for discussing the implications of this research for current practice. Current research in neuroscience and learning supports a multi-sensory approach to learning in which students can be taught to use all the senses to improve learning, as opposed to a preferred learning style. Research based learning strategies along with practical application and resources for teaching will be shared.


W-12
Affecting the First-Year Experience for Latino and African-American Males
February 10, 2018
1:00 pm - 5:00 pm
$135

Wayne Jackson, Director of Multicultural Academic and Support Services - University of Central Florida; Tony Davis, Counselor - Montgomery County Community College

This workshop will address in particular the first –year experience of African American and Latino Males at institutions of higher education. We know that African-American male students have the lowest retention and graduation rates compared to females and other ethnic groups (U.S. Department of Education, 2016). This workshop will also provide you the opportunity to begin the work of designing new programs and initiatives to implement during the first-year experience that will address the retention issues of African American and Latino males on your campus.


W-13
Delivering an Effective First-Year Experience Course at 2-year Institutions
February 10, 2018
1:00 pm - 5:00 pm
$135


Julie McLaughlin, Professor and Department Chair for First-Year Courses - Cincinnati State Technical and Community College; Aaron Thompson, Interim President - Kentucky State University

Two-year colleges often struggle with what topics should be covered in an FYE Course and how it should be delivered. Budget restraints, lack of quality instructors, a diverse student population, and little institutional support are just a few barriers that are faced. This session will cover how to overcome these obstacles along with how to select content and engage the students, the need for instructor training, how to effectively assess the course, and how to make those tough administrative course decisions (i.e. class size, course standardization, credit hours, etc.). This session will be relevant for schools trying to build an FYE course from scratch as well as schools who are trying to strengthen or update their course.


W-14
Using the Science of Motivation to Engage All Learners
February 10, 2018
1:00 pm - 5:00 pm
$135

Christine Harrington, Executive Director - New Jersey Center for Student Success; Melissa Thomas, Lecturer - University of Texas at Austin

Perhaps one of the most important student success factors is motivation, yet faculty members often struggle with how to best motivate students and ultimately influence student learning. Theory and research on student motivation will come alive in this interactive workshop. Using Wlodkowski and Ginsberg's (1995) Motivational Framework for Culturally Responsive Teaching as a backdrop, we'll explore practical ways to put theory and research into immediate practice in your college classroom and institution. Come learn what works and how to positively influence student learning!


W-15
Student Success Initiatives Built Upon Data Analytics
February 10, 2018
1:00 pm - 5:00 pm
$135



Alan Bearman, Professor of History, Dean of University Libraries and the Center for Student Success and Retention - Washburn University; Elaine Lewis, Assistant Undergraduate Director - Virginia Tech - Washburn University; Bob Handley, Director of Strategic Analysis and Reporting - Washburn University

Higher education literature is flush with discussion regarding data analytics as a key factor in student success initiatives. This workshop will examine how to deploy a data analytics strategy that is replicable regardless of budget and at any size institution. In an activity-based session, the presenters will help attendees think through the current relationships at their campus between student success leaders and institutional research. Then, working alongside attendees, the presenters will help attendees consider how to maximize their institution's effective use of analytics to improve student outcomes such as retention and on-time graduation.


W-16
Exploration Before Declaration: Helping Our Students Find Their Calling
February 10, 2018
1:00 pm - 5:00 pm
$135

Michele Campagna, Executive Director of the Center for Advising & Student Transitions - Montclair State University; Joe Cuseo, Professor Emeritus, Psychology Educational Advisor - Marymount College, AVID for Higher Education

The rapidity of technological and global developments require that first-year advising programs take an integrated approach to major and career exploration. As many of the professions that will be available upon graduation do not yet exist, advisors need to guide students toward exploring their skills, values, and interests rather than declaring a major. Comprehensive advising initiatives that include self-assessment activities, integrated curricular and co-curricular experiences, and highlight the value of the liberal arts can help students select majors that are the right fit, promote graduation and retention rates, and better prepare students for the prospects that await them as graduates